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Today's Headlines: Two Champions of Children Are Given Nobel Peace Prize-NYT-PALMERA 777-12-10-2014-7-SUSPENSO-10/11.
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Today's Headlines Saturday, October 11, 2014







IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Travel | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Two Champions of Children Are Given Nobel Peace Prize
By DECLAN WALSH
Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani advocate of girls' education, and Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian who has rescued trafficked children from slavery, shared the prize.

Officials Admit a 'Defeat' by Ebola in Sierra Leone
By ADAM NOSSITER
The decision to help families treat patients at home signifies a significant shift in the struggle against the rampaging disease.

Secret Money Fueling a Flood of Political Ads
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
More than half of the general election advertising aired by outside groups in the battle for control of Congress has come from organizations that disclose little or nothing about their donors.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S.
VIDEO: What 'We the People' Want
With less than a month until the midterm elections, polls show that Americans are deeply dissatisfied with their elected officials. The Times drove from Washington to St. Louis to ask why.
Related Article



OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
What I Saw as an N.F.L. Ball Boy
By ERIC KESTER
Games spent gathering helmet fragments and supplying smelling salts.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"We are killing them, and they keep coming."
TIMUR DEMIRBOGA, a Kurdish fighter in Kobani, a Syrian city besieged by Islamic State forces.


Today's Video

VIDEO: The Rise of Anonymous Political Giving
Inside the growing influence of completely anonymous campaign contributions and the impact on the 2014 election.
Related Article



VIDEO: League of Legends' Profitable World
For Riot Games, the creator of the wildly popular League of Legends game, fan experience comes before profits - and that might be key to its success.
Related Article



VIDEO: Small Plates
For the magazine's fall Food issue, we treated six second graders from P.S. 295 in Brooklyn to dinner at Daniel, where the seven-course tasting menu goes for $220 a person.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

'Putin's Tiger,' in a Territory Grab All His Own, Swims to China
By ANDREW JACOBS
A Siberian tiger released into the wild in Russia in the spring crossed a river this week into China, where wildlife officials are tracking his whereabouts.

ISIS Intensifies Siege of Kurdish Enclave in Syria
By ERIC SCHMITT and KAREEM FAHIM
The Islamic State is pouring reinforcements into the besieged Syrian city of Kobani, a Kurdish enclave, despite heavy attacks from American-led aircraft.

THE SATURDAY PROFILE
Chinese Writer, Tackling Tiananmen, Wields 'Power to Offend'
By JANE PERLEZ
Publishers in China would not touch Sheng Keyi's "Death Fugue," which fashions the Tiananmen crackdown into a stomach-churning, exuberantly written allegory.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

As Apprentices in Classroom, Teachers Learn What Works
By MOTOKO RICH
Three residents in a teacher training program known for its practical approach were followed through a year of setbacks and successes in California classrooms.

Protests Begin Over Ferguson Shooting Amid Dismay in St. Louis Case
By ALAN BLINDER and MONICA DAVEY
A "Weekend of Resistance" over the death of Michael Brown gets underway with attention to the shooting of another black teenager, Vonderrit Myers Jr.

Ebola Patient Sent Home Despite Fever, Records Show
By MANNY FERNANDEZ and KEVIN SACK
Medical records of Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian who died this week in Dallas, contradict earlier statements from the hospital that treated him.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

LISTENING POST
Recent White House Memoirs Target Lame Duck Over a Potential Successor
By MARK LANDLER
In the growing crop of tell-alls by former Obama officials, Hillary Rodham Clinton has emerged largely unscathed - proof that it is easier to kick a sitting second-term president than a potential future one.

Oregon First Lady's Ex-Marriage Spills Into Race for Governor
By KIRK JOHNSON
Cylvia Hayes, the wife of Gov. John Kitzhaber, said she married her third husband, an Ethiopian immigrant, for money in a sham marriage in 1997.

Maneuvering Persists After Courts Block New Voter Conditions
By ERIK ECKHOLM
Voter ID requirements were delayed in Wisconsin and Texas, though officials continued to look for ways around the decisions ahead of next month's elections.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

THE UPSHOT
Wall Street's Whipsaw Week Shows Global Economy's Flaws
By NEIL IRWIN and PETER EAVIS
With markets priced for expectations of a steadily improving global economy, troubling signs that growth may have stalled.
TV Ratings by Nielsen Had Errors for Months
By BILL CARTER and EMILY STEEL
The mistake raises questions about the company's increasingly criticized system for measuring TV audiences.

Harvoni, a Hepatitis C Drug From Gilead, Wins F.D.A. Approval
By ANDREW POLLACK
The drug is the first complete treatment for the disease that requires a single daily pill.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

POWER UP
Behind League of Legends, E-Sports's Main Attraction
By DAVID SEGAL
Riot Games, creator of the wildly popular League of Legends, says it puts players' enjoyment above the need to produce profits. And that may be the key to the game's success.
Interactive: 10,000 League of Legends Games in 30 Seconds

Video: League of Legends' Profitable World



BITS BLOG
Links to Photos Said to Be Stolen From Snapchat Users Flood Message Boards
By MIKE ISAAC
Just weeks after a celebrity hacking scandal, members of an anonymous online message board claimed to have accessed hundreds of thousands of photographs of noncelebrities.


BITS BLOG
Apple's Jony Ive Has Harsh Words for Xiaomi
By BRIAN X. CHEN
In a rare public appearance, Apple's head of design talked about Apple's design process and remarked bluntly in response to a question involving the Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
At Florida State, Football Clouds Justice
By MIKE McINTIRE and WALT BOGDANICH
Police and court records and interviews with witnesses show that the Tallahassee police on numerous occasions have soft-pedaled allegations of wrongdoing by Seminoles football players.


ROYALS 8, ORIOLES 6, 10 INNINGS
Royals Keep Magic Alive, Beating Orioles With Homers in the 10th
By DAVID WALDSTEIN
The Royals won Game 1 of the A.L.C.S. against the Orioles with more heroics in extra innings.


Proper Farewell, Despite Potential for Awkwardness
By ANDREW KEH
After being left off the World Cup roster this summer, Landon Donovan put aside tension with the U.S. men's national team and played the final game of his 15-year international career, a friendly match against Ecuador.
Slide Show: A Farewell Match for a Sport's Star


For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
ON COMEDY
In a Big House, but Playing It Small
By JASON ZINOMAN
Aziz Ansari, known for his jittery energy, played Madison Square Garden with a calmer, humbler tone, and even interacted with the crowd.


Scholars Fear Loss of Eden in London
By RACHEL DONADIO
The Warburg Institute is under financial pressure from its host, the University of London, and there are worries that it will be broken up or absorbed by another institution.


DANCE REVIEW
Blithely Stepping Out of a Comfort Zone
By GIA KOURLAS
In "Chalk and Soot" at the Lincoln Center White Light Festival, John Heginbotham choreographs to silence and Colin Jacobsen has turned to writing vocals.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region
ELECTION 2014
Cuomo's Rival a Conservative Since Day One
By DAVID W. CHEN
Many political candidates have changed, over time, on key issues, but Rob Astorino, the Republican candidate for New York governor, is basically the same steadfast conservative that he was at 18.


Principal of Failing Brooklyn School Quits, Saying City Lacks an Education Plan
By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS
Bernard Gassaway, the principal of Boys and Girls High School in Bedford-Stuyvesant, offered Mayor Bill de Blasio's Education Department one of its sternest public rebukes yet.


In Upstate New York, Fight Pits Gambling Empire vs. a Baron's Heirs
By CHARLES V BAGLI
Caesars Entertainment has proposed a casino in Harriman, N.Y., a village named after E.H. Harriman, whose descendants are trying to block the development.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Travel
New Zealand for Beginners
By JOE DRAPE
Finding himself in a country he'd never given much thought, the author manages to hurtle down slopes, go on a picturesque "tramp" and hit some pubs - all in a few days.


THE GETAWAY
The Art of Slowing Down in a Museum
By STEPHANIE ROSENBLOOM
Instead of hunting masterpieces at a fevered clip, spending more time with fewer works just might make for a better visit.


PERSONAL JOURNEYS
Won Over by the Battlefield
By HELENE STAPINSKI
A son's fascination with historic battles sets the itinerary for family vacations that stretch from Normandy to Pearl Harbor.

For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »

Obituaries
David Jones, Florist to Hollywood, Dies at 78
By PAUL VITELLO
Mr. Jones was probably best known as the floral designer for Elizabeth Taylor's 1991 wedding and for Michael Jackson's funeral in 2009.


Carolyn Kizer, Pulitzer-Winning Poet, Dies at 89
By MARGALIT FOX
Ms. Kizer was known for political and satirical works that, she said, came with "a sting in the tail."


Ray K. Metzker, Art Photographer, Dies at 83
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Mr. Metzker, who experimented with photographic forms for six decades, is perhaps best known for his cityscapes and landscapes.
Slide Show: Visions by a Master of Black and White


For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

EditorialsTODAY'S EDITORIALS
Having to Rebuild Gaza, Again
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
What is the point of spending many millions of dollars to reconstruct the strip just so it can be destroyed in the next war?
The Border Crisis Isn't Over

'Operation Choke Point' Hits the Mark


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed
OP-ED COLUMNIST
Putin Shows His Hand
By JOE NOCERA
The Western sanctions imposed on Russia may be generating some unintended consequences.
Columnist Page



OP-ED | TAHMIMA ANAM
How to Rob a Bank in Bangladesh
By TAHMIMA ANAM
The hard way is to drill through the wall. Most choose the easy way: take a big loan and default on it.

EDITORIAL
The Border Crisis Isn't Over
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The Obama administration and Congress must do better to assure that migrants who fear persecution are given careful consideration.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAYOn Oct. 11, 1968, Apollo 7, the first manned Apollo mission, was launched with astronauts Wally Schirra, Donn Fulton Eisele and R. Walter Cunningham aboard.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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N.Y. Today: Cuomo's Rival a Conservative Since Day One; Principal of Failing Brooklyn School Quits, Saying City Lacks an Education Plan
Saturday, October 11, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

News

ELECTION 2014
Cuomo's Rival a Conservative Since Day One
By DAVID W. CHEN
Many political candidates have changed, over time, on key issues, but Rob Astorino, the Republican candidate for New York governor, is basically the same steadfast conservative that he was at 18.

Principal of Failing Brooklyn School Quits, Saying City Lacks an Education Plan
By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS
Bernard Gassaway, the principal of Boys and Girls High School in Bedford-Stuyvesant, offered Mayor Bill de Blasio's Education Department one of its sternest public rebukes yet.

In Upstate New York, Fight Pits Gambling Empire vs. a Baron's Heirs
By CHARLES V BAGLI
Caesars Entertainment has proposed a casino in Harriman, N.Y., a village named after E.H. Harriman, whose descendants are trying to block the development.

Lawyer in Central Park Jogger Case Hired by Garner's Family
By BENJAMIN WEISER
The family of Eric Garner, a Staten Island man who died after a confrontation with the police, has hired Jonathan C. Moore to replace Sanford A. Rubenstein, who has been accused of rape.

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Features

STREETSCAPES
An Aristocratic Painter's Astonishing Aesthetic
By CHRISTOPHER GRAY
Murals by Robert Winthrop Chanler may be seen at Coe Hall in Oyster Bay, N.Y.
More Streetscapes Columns



Sports

Brian Cashman's Era With Yankees Is Extended for Three Years, but Kevin Long Is Dismissed
By DAVID WALDSTEIN
Cashman, the team's general manager since 1998, received a three-year contract on Friday, while the coaches Kevin Long and Mick Kelleher were fired.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

What Happens When Second Graders Are Treated to a Seven-Course, $220 Tasting Meal
VIDEO BY JEFFREY BLITZ
Students from P.S. 295 in Brooklyn learn the fine points of French cuisine at one of New York's poshest restaurants.

Arts

ON COMEDY
In a Big House, but Playing It Small
By JASON ZINOMAN
Aziz Ansari, known for his jittery energy, played Madison Square Garden with a calmer, humbler tone, and even interacted with the crowd.

DANCE REVIEW
Blithely Stepping Out of a Comfort Zone
By GIA KOURLAS
In "Chalk and Soot" at the Lincoln Center White Light Festival, John Heginbotham choreographs to silence and Colin Jacobsen has turned to writing vocals.

ART REVIEW
3 Men and a Posse, Chasing Newness
By ROBERTA SMITH
The Guggenheim's "Zero: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s-60s" is an alternately dazzling and thin walk-in history lesson about the three Zero artists of postwar Germany.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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N.Y. Today: Amid Concern About Virus in U.S., Belleveue Says It's Ready for the Worst; Cuomo Reflects in Memoir on Highs and Lows, Both Personal and Political-NYT-PALMERA 777-12-10-2014-7-SUSPENSO-7/8/9.

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Thursday, October 9, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Preparing for Ebola

Good morning to you on this clear, cool Thursday.
New York City is gearing up to deal with Ebola.
Starting Saturday, screeners at Kennedy and La Guardia airports will take the temperature of every traveler arriving from any of the three West African countries hit hardest by the virus.
City agencies will brief the mayor and City Council on their Ebola plans at the council chambers today at 12:20 p.m.
And yesterday, as news arrived that a man had died from the disease in Dallas, officials at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan offered a look at the unit where an arriving Ebola patient would be sent.
Tatiana Schlossberg of The Times was among the reporters who took the tour.
Bellevue is equipped with several isolation rooms, a lab, and undercover staff members tasked with testing emergency room workers' responses.
More of the day's news »



News

Amid Concern About Virus in U.S., New York Hospital Says It's Ready for the Worst
By TATIANA SCHLOSSBERG
Officials at Belleveue Hospital Center said it had adapted its equipment and procedures to treat patients suspected of carrying the virus, though it was highly unlikely that New York would see a case.

Cuomo Reflects in Memoir on Highs and Lows, Both Personal and Political
By THOMAS KAPLAN and SUSANNE CRAIG
Among the revelations contained in Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo's coming memoir: He learned about his divorce from a journalist and blames himself for his father's political demise.

Head of Jails Is Criticized on Violence at Rikers
By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ and MICHAEL WINERIP
Joseph Ponte, the city's correction commissioner, was asked why he had promoted an official at the jail who was involved in reporting distorted data on violence there.

17 Charter Schools Approved for New York City, Expanding a Polarizing Network
By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS
The decision by a state committee substantially increased the size of Success Academy, one of the city's largest and most polarizing charter networks.

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Features

In Gentrification's Shadow, a Campground for the Homeless in Brooklyn
By COREY KILGANNON
To hear the campers' stories is to glimpse at the underbelly of South Park Slope, a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood where Anthony Pastore and Frank Grillo have spent their entire lives.

BUILDING BLOCKS
Burial Vaults Inspire a Celebration of a Church Opposed to Slavery
By DAVID W. DUNLAP
The bodies discovered at a SoHo construction site belonged to members of the multiracial Spring Street Presbyterian Church, which was sacked by anti-abolition mobs in 1834.

Sports

Standing Out at Fitting In
By ALLAN KREDA
Martin St. Louis, the 39-year-old sharpshooter the Rangers acquired in a deadline deal last season, is becoming a role model for his teammates ahead of his first full season in New York.

Kim and Terry Pegula Approved as Owners of Buffalo Bills
By KEN BELSON
The sale of the Buffalo Bills to the Pegulas, who also own the Sabres, was unanimously approved by the N.F.L. owners at a meeting in New York.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

HUNGRY CITY | COM TAM NINH KIEU
Rice and Noodles in Many Guises
By LIGAYA MISHAN
The menu at Com Tam Ninh Kieu in the Bronx focuses on broken-rice dishes and noodle soups.

Arts

THEATER REVIEW | 'SHAKEPEARE'S SONNETS'
Words Felt, if Not Quite Fathomed
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
In Robert Wilson and Rufus Wainwright's "Shakepeare's Sonnets," actors from the Berlin Ensemble caper about to musical accompaniment as the poetry is recited or sung in German.

THEATER REVIEW | 'NOT I,' 'FOOTFALLS,' 'ROCKABY'
Beaten (Down) by the Clock
By BEN BRANTLEY
Lisa Dwan plays all the roles in "Not I," "Footfalls" and "Rockaby," short Beckett plays that are part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival.

DANCE REVIEW
Tapping Feet, Uninhibited, Step Up and Pay Tribute to a Voice of Jazz
By BRIAN SEIBERT
Michela Marino Lerman, with two other dancers, a vocalist and a jazz trio, paid homage to Betty Carter.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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Copyright 2014 | The New York Times Company | NYTimes.com 620 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Today's Headlines: Cry of G.O.P. in Campaign: All Is Dismal
Today's Headlines Friday, October 10, 2014







IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Movies | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

POLITICAL MEMO
Cry of G.O.P. in Campaign: All Is Dismal
By JEREMY W. PETERS
With four weeks to go before the midterm elections, Republicans are pointing to the Islamic State, Secret Service failings and Ebola as evidence of what they call White House incompetence.

In Rickety Boats, Cuban Migrants Again Flee to U.S.
By FRANCES ROBLES
The number of Cubans attempting the voyage to the United States has nearly doubled in the past two years, putting the spotlight on the growing frustration with a post-Fidel Cuba.

Heart-Rending Test in Ebola Zone: A Baby
By SHERI FINK
What to do when the task is caring for an hours-old preemie whose mother might have died of Ebola.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

BOOKS
Patrick Modiano, a Modern 'Proust,' Is Awarded Nobel in Literature
By ALEXANDRA ALTER and DAN BILEFSKY
The Swedish Academy cited the ability of Mr. Modiano, whose novels center on topics like memory, identity and guilt, to evoke "the most ungraspable human destinies" in his work.
Patrick Modiano: Excerpts From His Work



OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Mexico's Deadly Narco-Politics
By IOAN GRILLO
Corrupt politicians are bad enough. Imagine being ruled by sociopathic gangsters.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"Things that were bad in Cuba are now worse. If there was more money in Cuba to pay for the trips, everyone would go."
LEONARDO HEREDIA, a 24-year-old Cuban baker, who made it to Florida in a homemade boat after eight failed attempts.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Three Hopes for an Ebola Treatment
With thousands infected with the Ebola virus, millions of dollars are being pledged to develop treatment options. Three avenues that have potential but are a long way from being viable treatments.

VIDEO: ScienceTake | Snakes on a Hill
How sidewinders sinuously slide up a sandy slope.
Related Article



VIDEO: This Week's Movies: Oct. 10, 2014
The New York Times film critics review "Whiplash," "Kill the Messenger" and "St. Vincent."
Related Review: 'Whiplash'

Related Review: 'Kill the Messenger'

Related Review: 'St. Vincent'


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

U.S. Opposing China's Answer to World Bank
By JANE PERLEZ
The United States views the proposed Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank as a political tool for China to bring countries in Southeast Asia closer to its orbit.

West Africans Make Plea for Long List of Ebola Needs
By SABRINA TAVERNISE
The presidents of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the nations most affected by the Ebola outbreak, made their case at a meeting of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund in Washington.

Turkey Seeks Buffer Zone on the Border With Syria
By TIM ARANGO and CEYLAN YEGINSU
Creating a no-fly zone and stepping up combat air patrols would open a direct conflict with Syria, going beyond the U.S. mission against the Islamic State.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Paying Respects, Pentagon Revives Vietnam, and War Over Truth
By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG
The Pentagon is planning a 50th anniversary commemoration of the Vietnam War. But the website for the effort largely describes a war of valor and honor that would be unrecognizable to many of the Americans who fought in and against it.

With Ebola's Arrival at Nebraska Center, It's No Longer a Drill
By ABBY GOODNOUGH
With the arrival of two Ebola patients in the last six weeks, the Nebraska Biocontainment Patient Care Unit is at the forefront of the nation's response to the disease.

Homeless Outreach in Volumes: Books by Bike for 'Outside' People in Oregon
By KIRK JOHNSON
Street Books, a nonprofit book service for "people living outside," is staffed by employees of Multnomah Public Library in Portland.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Lawmaker Asks Holder to Review Foreign Cash Accepted by Think Tanks
By ERIC LIPTON
Representative Frank R. Wolf has asked the Justice Department to determine whether the research groups violated federal law by not registering as a "foreign agent."
Fox News Reporter Fought Subpoena in Justice Dept. Leak Inquiry
By MATT APUZZO
Court documents reveal a lengthy court fight between the reporter, Mike Levine, and the Justice Department over whether he could be forced to reveal his sources.
Courts Strike Down Voter ID Laws in Wisconsin and Texas
By ADAM LIPTAK
The Supreme Court stopped the Wisconsin requirement, and a federal trial court in Texas ruled against the law there.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business
DEALBOOK
Sluggish Global Outlook Ripples in Markets
By NATHANIEL POPPER
Renewed fears of an economic slowdown in Europe and Asia have injected a note of fear into what had been some complacent markets, leading to a sharp sell-off in stocks on Thursday.

BITS BLOG
Microsoft's Nadella Backtracks From Comment on Women's Pay
By NICK WINGFIELD
Satya Nadella, the chief executive of Microsoft, implied during a speech on Thursday that women should not ask for pay raises, a statement that quickly put him in the hot seat.

Merkel Hints at Economic Policy Shift in Germany
By JACK EWING and ALISON SMALE
Faced with gloomy economic data, Chancellor Angela Merkel said Berlin might use spending to stimulate growth - a step her critics have long advocated.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Amazon Shops for Real Estate in New York City
By DAVID STREITFELD and CHARLES V BAGLI
Real estate executives said the building would be used for offices and a distribution center.

DEALBOOK
Symantec to Split Into Two Companies
By DAVID GELLES
With a market value of more than $16 billion, Symantec will become two publicly traded entities - one focused on security, and one focused on information management.

BITS BLOG
Uber Flunks the Better Business Bureau Test
By MIKE ISAAC
The car-summoning start-up received poor reviews based customer complaints about the company's pricing practices.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

Adding Wrinkle to Old Rivalry, the Giants and the Eagles Look Spry
By BILL PENNINGTON
The Giants are preparing to play Philadelphia for the 163rd time, and it may be the first time that each team features a spread-it-out, pass-happy formation.

Formula One Debates Risks After Serious Injury to Jules Bianchi
By JOHN F. BURNS
A crash in Japan last weekend left the French driver Jules Bianchi comatose, and at a news conference Thursday some drivers preparing for the first Russian Grand Prix on Sunday described a shadow over the sport.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP
Georgia's Todd Gurley, Heisman Contender, Is Suspended Indefinitely
By MARC TRACY
The tailback, a leading Heisman Trophy contender, has been suspended indefinitely while the university investigates a suspected violation of N.C.A.A. rules.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

ART REVIEW
Wisps From an Old Man's Dreams
By HOLLAND COTTER
"Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs," at the Museum of Modern Art, presents about 100 painted-paper works, produced during a difficult era for the artist.

THEATER REVIEW | 'IT'S ONLY A PLAY'
Well, Did What's-His-Name Like It?
By BEN BRANTLEY
The revival of Terrence McNally's "It's Only a Play," a Broadway star vehicle about a Broadway star vehicle, allows theatergoers to feel as though they're among the insiders.
Keep the Jokes, Change the Names



TELEVISION REVIEW | 'THE AFFAIR'
He Says, She Says. Who Knows?
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY
"The Affair," a Showtime series that begins Sunday, puts an enigmatic frame around the least mysterious impulse in the world.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

Movies

'ST. VINCENT'
Geezer Meets Kid, and, Well, You Know
By MANOHLA DARGIS
Bill Murray is in full codger mode in "St. Vincent," a comic Brooklyn tale of intergenerational friendship and complications written and directed by Theodore Melfi.

'THE JUDGE'
Back Home Again, and Little Has Changed
By A. O. SCOTT
In "The Judge," family dynamics become more strained after a lawyer returns home for his mother's funeral.

'KILL THE MESSENGER'
A Reporter in the Crosshairs
By MANOHLA DARGIS
"Kill the Messenger" tells the story of a real investigative reporter, Gary Webb, whose reporting about the C.I.A., the contras and drug dealers came under attack.
For more movie news and reviews, go to NYTimes.com/Movies »

N.Y./Region

A Teacher Accused of Abuse Seen to Have Never Grown Up
By KIM BARKER and KATE TAYLOR
Sean Shaynak, a Brooklyn Technical High School teacher who faces 36 charges including sexual abuse and forcible touching, appeared forever stuck in high school to those who knew him.
Policy Change Could Benefit New York's Landlords and Tenants
By MIREYA NAVARRO
The new policy guidelines will allow hundreds of mixed-income rental buildings to sell most of their apartments as long as they permanently preserve their low-income rentals or increase their number.

CITY HALL MEMO
De Blasio's Transparency Is Turning Opaque Under Fire
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Faced with embarrassing questions about his wife's top aide and other issues he finds annoying, Mayor Bill de Blasio has been replacing his promised ask-me-anything attitude with "case closed" peevishness.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Obituaries

Jan Hooks of 'Saturday Night Live' Fame Is Dead at 57
By PETER KEEPNEWS
Ms. Hooks joined "S.N.L." in 1986 and was part of a cast that is widely regarded as one of the best in the show's history. Most recently, she played the mother of the character Jenna Maroney on "30 Rock."

Peter Peyser, Legislator Who Defied the G.O.P., Dies at 93
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Mr. Peyser rose from mayor of a Westchester County village to Congress, then defied the Republican leadership by challenging Senator James L. Buckley in a 1976 primary.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
A Global Economic Malaise
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Too many finance ministers and central bankers are unwilling or ill prepared to respond to a world economy on the verge of a recession.
New York's Jails Need Federal Oversight

Grim Executions in Afghanistan

Mistakes and Confusion on Marriage Equality


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Money Matters Less
By DAVID BROOKS
Remember all the talk about how Citizens United would give Republicans a spending advantage forevermore? That hasn't happened.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Secret Deficit Lovers
By PAUL KRUGMAN
Debt scolds hate good fiscal news so much that most Americans haven't heard that the deficit plunge of the past several years continues.
Columnist Page


EDITORIAL
New York's Jails Need Federal Oversight
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
It will take constant outside pressure to end the brutality and corruption at the Rikers Island jail.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Oct. 10, 1973, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew pleaded no contest to one count of federal income tax evasion and resigned his office.
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N.Y. Today: A Teacher Accused of Abuse Seen to Have Never Grown Up; Policy Change Could Benefit City's Landlords and Tenants
Friday, October 10, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Glimpse the Hidden City

Good morning on this throwback Friday.
This weekend, the Grand Lodge of Masons in Manhattan welcomes all.
The World's Fair grounds in Queens want you wandering down their curving Great Hall.
The grand library of the Brooklyn Historical Society, too, awaits your whispers.
You can thank the 12th annual Open House New York Weekend for more than 300 behind-the-facade visits.
Gregory Wessner, the executive director of Open House New York, said the visits are intended to reveal "how important architecture and urban design are to shaping our experience of the city."
He recommends taking this last chance to see the refurbished modernist mecca to air travel, the TWA Terminal, at Kennedy Airport before it is converted into a hotel.
More of the day's news »



News

A Teacher Accused of Abuse Seen to Have Never Grown Up
By KIM BARKER and KATE TAYLOR
Sean Shaynak, a Brooklyn Technical High School teacher who faces 36 charges including sexual abuse and forcible touching, appeared forever stuck in high school to those who knew him.
Policy Change Could Benefit New York's Landlords and Tenants
By MIREYA NAVARRO
The new policy guidelines will allow hundreds of mixed-income rental buildings to sell most of their apartments as long as they permanently preserve their low-income rentals or increase their number.

CITY HALL MEMO
De Blasio's Transparency Is Turning Opaque Under Fire
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Faced with embarrassing questions about his wife's top aide and other issues he finds annoying, Mayor Bill de Blasio has been replacing his promised ask-me-anything attitude with "case closed" peevishness.

Lincoln Center Turns to Solar Power to Provide Some of Its Bright Light
By JAMES BARRON
Thirty-six panels have been installed on the roof of the Rose Building in Manhattan, representing another step in a campaign to go green.

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Features

At Chumley's, a Former Speakeasy, the Password Doesn't Work
By JAMES BARRON
Construction work and repairs are continuing at the Greenwich Village bar, which has been closed since part of a wall collapsed in 2007.

Columnist

ABOUT NEW YORK
Joined in the Spotlight No More
By JIM DWYER
After years of working together on civil rights and police brutality cases, the Rev. Al Sharpton has cut ties with Sanford A. Rubenstein, a lawyer who has been accused of sexual assault.

Sports

URBAN ATHLETE
A Hip-Swiveling Workout That's Steamy in Every Way
By DANIEL KRIEGER
A Jamaican-inspired workout class in Manhattan called Brukwine is an invitation to women of all shapes and sizes to shed their inhibitions and move with abandon.

Adding Wrinkle to Old Rivalry, the Giants and the Eagles Look Spry
By BILL PENNINGTON
The Giants are preparing to play Philadelphia for the 163rd time, and it may be the first time that each team features a spread-it-out, pass-happy formation.

N.H.L. ROUNDUP
Timely Carom Assists Nash and Rangers in Opener; Devils Also Win
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rick Nash had two goals and an assist, including the tiebreaking score, and the Rangers beat the St. Louis Blues, 3-2, in the opener for both teams.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

LIVING CITY
Miles of Steam Pipes Snake Beneath New York
By GREG MOYER
This episode of "Living City," a video series about New York's infrastructure, looks at the history of the city's steam system, the largest in the world.
More 'Living City' Episodes



Arts

THEATER REVIEW | 'IT'S ONLY A PLAY'
Well, Did What's-His-Name Like It?
By BEN BRANTLEY
The revival of Terrence McNally's "It's Only a Play," a Broadway star vehicle about a Broadway star vehicle, allows theatergoers to feel as though they're among the insiders.
Keep the Jokes, Change the Names



DANCE REVIEW
The Uncanny Charms of Naïve Simplicity
By ALASTAIR MACAULAY
Mark Morris's company presented the premiere of his work "Words," set to music by Mendelssohn, at the Fall for Dance Festival at City Center.

Mandela and Fela, Honored in Dance and Song
By A. C. LEE
Nelson Mandela and the Nigerian musician Fela will be honored in multidisciplinary events this weekend at the Apollo Theater in Harlem and BRIC in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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  • 106 days ago via site
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Today's Headlines: Turkish Inaction on ISIS Advance Dismays the U.S.-NYT-PLAMERA 777-12-10-2014-7-SUSPENSO-4/5/6.
Today's Headlines Wednesday, October 8, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Dining & Wine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

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Top News

Turkish Inaction on ISIS Advance Dismays the U.S.
By MARK LANDLER, ANNE BARNARD and ERIC SCHMITT
As fighters with ISIS bore down Tuesday on the Turkish border, President Obama's plan to fight the militant group without being drawn deeper into the Syrian civil war was coming under acute strain.
Video: Fighting Rages in Syrian Border Town



Court Decisions on Voting Rules Sow Confusion in State Races
By TRIP GABRIEL
With the midterm elections weeks away, the rulings over laws that Republican-led state governments passed to more tightly regulate voting are changing procedures and could affect outcomes in some states.

THE EBOLA WARD
Life, Death and Grim Routine Fill the Day at a Liberian Ebola Clinic
By SHERI FINK
Health workers tend to people sickened by Ebola and those quarantined while they wait to learn if they have the virus.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

BUSINESS
To Lure Young Readers, Nonfiction Writers Sanitize and Simplify
By ALEXANDRA ALTER
Best-selling authors are writing new editions of their books for children and young adults, mining a large new market.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTORS
Will Syria Be Obama's Vietnam?
By FREDRIK LOGEVALL and GORDON M. GOLDSTEIN
The president says he won't send troops. But war has its own logic.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"I wouldn't say I reject my identity as Chinese, because I've never felt Chinese in the first place. The younger generations don't think they're Chinese."
YEUNG HOI-KIU, 20, a resident of Hong Kong, where a sense of alienation from mainland China helped spark student-led protests against Beijing's efforts to impose controls.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Making Quinoa and Rice Bowls
Melissa Clark assembles a hearty meal with quinoa, kale, kimchi, egg and a simple dressing.
Related Article



VIDEO: In Performance | Bridget Everett
Ms. Everett, with the composer Marc Shaiman on piano, sings the number "I'll Take You Home" from her autobiographical show "Rock Bottom," which plays through Oct. 16 at Joe's Pub.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Hong Kong Officials and Protesters Agree to Talk
By MICHAEL FORSYTHE and ALAN WONG
The negotiations set to begin on Friday will address changing the electoral system, but some students expressed disappointment at the narrow range of the planned talks.

Demands for an Explanation Grow After a Nurse in Spain Contracts Ebola
By RAPHAEL MINDER
The nurse's husband and two other people were quarantined, and monitoring was extended to 50 other people who might have come into contact with her.
Ebola Patient in Dallas on Ventilator, Officials Say



Hezbollah Attack Along Border With Lebanon Wounds Two Israeli Soldiers
By ISABEL KERSHNER and ANNE BARNARD
Israel responded to the attack with artillery fire toward two Hezbollah positions in southern Lebanon, according to the Israeli military.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Health Officials Promise Extra Airport Screening for Ebola
By JAD MOUAWAD
Passengers could have their temperature checked or be subject to detailed questioning, but health officials cautioned against more draconian measures like travel bans.
Gay Marriage Is Upheld in Nevada and Idaho
By ERIK ECKHOLM
The ruling by a federal appeals court came a day after a Supreme Court decision that could pave the way for a nationwide right to same-sex marriage.

Dealt a Victory in Court, Advocates for Gay Rights Focus on a New Frontier
By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG
Attention is turning toward regions where legal protections for gays are practically nonexistent and where religious and cultural barriers are strong.
Gay Marriage Is Upheld in Nevada and Idaho


For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

In This Election, Obama's Party Benches Him
By JONATHAN MARTIN
Democratic candidates - even those in states like Virginia that the president carried in 2008 and 2012 - do not want President Obama to campaign for them.

Berkeley Officials Outspent but Optimistic in Battle Over Soda Tax
By ADAM NAGOURNEY
Despite the soda industry's expensive campaign against a one-cent tax per ounce on sugary soda in Berkeley, Calif., and a similar effort in San Francisco, officials hope to set a precedent for the nation.

Justices Say Case of Inmate's Beard May Not Be the Best Test of Religious Liberty
By ADAM LIPTAK
The Supreme Court heard arguments on whether prison officials in Arkansas may prohibit a Muslim inmate from growing a half-inch beard.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Germany's Insistence on Austerity Meets With Revolt in the Eurozone
By ALISON SMALE and LIZ ALDERMAN
With new signs of economic trouble emerging, what has been a guiding European economic principle for several years is facing open revolt.
I.M.F. Asks Rich Nations for Support
By LANDON THOMAS Jr. and LIZ ALDERMAN
The International Monetary Fund said that cash-rich countries needed to step up large public investments to help keep the flagging global recovery on track.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

BITS BLOG
In Net Neutrality Discussion, Lawsuits Loom Large
By EDWARD WYATT
A consensus has finally emerged on net neutrality: Whatever rules the F.C.C. adopts, someone will take it to court.

BITS BLOG
Twitter Sues U.S. Government Over Data Disclosure Rules
By MIKE ISAAC
The social media giant wants to loosen restrictions on what it is allowed to tell users about government information requests.

BITS BLOG
IBM's Watson Attracts Commercial Clients
By STEVE LOHR
IBM's Watson unit is announcing its first wave of commercial partners, as the company tries to turn the impressive technology into a real business.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

GIANTS 3, NATIONALS 2
Without Ball Traveling Far, Giants Beat Nationals to Earn Trip to N.L.C.S.
By BILLY WITZ
San Francisco scored all three of its runs in the clinching game without the baseball leaving the infield - on a walk, a groundout and a wild pitch.

One-Third of the View, but for None of the Price
By BILLY WITZ
For a select few fans at Monday's Giants-Nationals playoff game in San Francisco, the experience was priceless. And the cost was even better. It was free.

CARDINALS 3, DODGERS 2
Cardinals Solve Dodgers' Clayton Kershaw Again and Advance
By TYLER KEPNER
Kershaw, widely considered the best pitcher in baseball, surrendered a three-run homer to Matt Adams, and the Dodgers and their ace fell short in October once more.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Time-Traveling to a Corner of Brooklyn's Past
By HOLLAND COTTER
The project "Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn" tells the story of Weeksville, a black village founded in the 19th century.

AN APPRAISAL
A Larger-Than-Life Impact on the Stage
By BEN BRANTLEY
Regardless of the size of the role, Marian Seldes, who died Tuesday at 86, made her theatrical performances memorable, with precision and flourish.

THEATER REVIEW | 'THE GREAT TRAGEDIES'
Raw Confessions and an Uprising
By LAURA COLLINS-HUGHES
Mike Daisey performs "The Great Tragedies," four monologues that touch on his grave frailties in the context of Shakespeare's tragedies, at California Shakespeare Theater.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region
Easing the Law for New Yorkers Shifting Gender
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
The proposals would lighten a burden for many New Yorkers wading through the bureaucratic labyrinths of employment applications and pension benefits, among others.

Review Finds Complaints of Police Chokeholds Increased as Definition Narrowed
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
A report says that in the New York Police Department's disciplinary proceedings and investigations by a city agency, the definition of a chokehold, banned for two decades, was limited.

Lawyers Challenge Lewdness Arrests at Port Authority Bus Terminal
By JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN
The Legal Aid Society says that the police are overzealously enforcing lewdness laws and, as a result, are arresting innocent men.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Dining & Wine

RESTAURANT REVIEW | HUERTAS
A Serendipitous Trip to Spain
By PETE WELLS
Huertas, a garlic-infused ode to the Basque Country, beckons in the East Village.

A GOOD APPETITE
Grain Bowls: How to Make Your Own
By MELISSA CLARK
Layers of flavors, textures and colors make a grain bowl a one-dish adventure.

A Twist Adds Complexity to a Pasta Dish
By MARK BITTMAN
Mark Bittman's take on a great pasta dish for the fall, pasta alla Norma.
For more dining news and recipes, go to NYTimes.com/Dining »

Obituaries

Vic Braden, Tennis's Pied Piper, Dies at 85
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Through instructional television, books, camps and clinics, Mr. Braden became "the patron saint of the weekend hacker."

Benedict J. Groeschel, Priest and Author, Dies at 81
By PAUL VITELLO
Father Groeschel was known in New York for his efforts on behalf of the poor, and worldwide as a television personality who denounced modernism and news reporting on sexual abuse by priests.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Secretly Buying Access to a Governor
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Both the Republican and Democratic governors' associations have set up social welfare groups with the purpose of raising secret political money.
Monopolizing Beer

A Brighter Future for the Neediest Parks

Don't Gamble Away Sterling Forest


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
An Adirondack Wilderness Imperiled
By EDWARD ZAHNISER
A plan set in motion by Gov. Andrew Cuomo would allow an open pit mine in forest preserve land.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Running on Empty
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Who's to blame for the recent major lapses from the Secret Service?
Columnist Page



OP-ED | MARK BITTMAN
The Next Battleground for Soda
By MARK BITTMAN
Coming votes in Berkeley and San Francisco might build on some encouraging momentum in the area of public health, especially when it comes to children.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Oct. 8, 1982, all labor organizations in Poland, including Solidarity, were banned.
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N.Y. Today: Easing the Law for New Yorkers Shifting Gender; Complaints of Police Chokeholds Increased as Definition Narrowed
Wednesday, October 8, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

A (Hidden) Lunar Eclipse

Good morning on this overcast Wednesday.
There's something special coming to the sky early this morning.
At 6:27 a.m. in New York, the sun, earth and moon start lining up like good schoolchildren, to create a total lunar eclipse at 6:55 a.m.
At that moment, the eclipsed full moon on the western horizon should look red.
But alas, because of the thick cloud cover, today's extra-special eclipse is not visible to us.
We asked Arlin Crotts, 56, a professor of astronomy at Columbia University and the author of a new 500-page book on the moon, to describe what we're missing.
Why does it look red?
More of the day's news »



News
Easing the Law for New Yorkers Shifting Gender
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
The proposals would lighten a burden for many New Yorkers wading through the bureaucratic labyrinths of employment applications and pension benefits, among others.

Review Finds Complaints of Police Chokeholds Increased as Definition Narrowed
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
A report says that in the New York Police Department's disciplinary proceedings and investigations by a city agency, the definition of a chokehold, banned for two decades, was limited.

Lawyers Challenge Lewdness Arrests at Port Authority Bus Terminal
By JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN
The Legal Aid Society says that the police are overzealously enforcing lewdness laws and, as a result, are arresting innocent men.

New York City Council Passes Bill Lowering the Speed Limit on Most Streets
By PATRICK McGEEHAN
The speed limit on residential streets in the city will be reduced to 25 miles per hour from 30 m.p.h. starting on Nov. 7.

ADVERTISEMENT






Columnist
ABOUT NEW YORK
Courthouse Serves Justice, With Indignity
By JIM DWYER
A defendant's requests to use a restroom that can accommodate her wheelchair are thwarted.

Sports

SPORTS OF THE TIMES
Burying Young Players Isn't Part of the Game
By JULIET MACUR
Communities on Long Island, in Alabama and in North Carolina recently gathered to say tearful goodbyes to players. But football continues to thrive.

Start of Everything Is a Game That Means Nothing
By ANDREW KEH
The Nets kicked off the preseason with an exhibition victory over Maccabi Tel Aviv at Barclays Center. Next up is a tour of China.

Islanders Make Roster Moves Ahead of N.H.L. Season
By ALLAN KREDA
The Islanders' opening-night roster will include the rookie defenseman Griffin Reinhart, 20, the fourth pick of the 2012 draft.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

ADVERTISEMENT


Multimedia

RESTAURANT REVIEW | HUERTAS
A Serendipitous Trip to Spain
By PETE WELLS
Huertas, a garlic-infused ode to the Basque Country, beckons in the East Village.

Arts

Time-Traveling to a Corner of Brooklyn's Past
By HOLLAND COTTER
The project "Funk, God, Jazz & Medicine: Black Radical Brooklyn" tells the story of Weeksville, a black village founded in the 19th century.

AN APPRAISAL
A Larger-Than-Life Impact on the Stage
By BEN BRANTLEY
Regardless of the size of the role, Marian Seldes, who died Tuesday at 86, made her theatrical performances memorable, with precision and flourish.

MUSIC REVIEW
A Band Member Returns to the Fold, and Camaraderie and Nostalgia Ensue
By JON PARELES
Fleetwood Mac, with Christine McVie, featured a nostalgic lineup in a concert at Madison Square Garden.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

Opinion

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
An Adirondack Wilderness Imperiled
By EDWARD ZAHNISER
A plan set in motion by Gov. Andrew Cuomo would allow an open pit mine in forest preserve land.


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Today's Headlines: Newly Vigilant, U.S. Will Screen Fliers for Ebola
Today's Headlines Thursday, October 9, 2014







IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Fashion & Style | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

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Top News

Newly Vigilant, U.S. Will Screen Fliers for Ebola
By SABRINA TAVERNISE
Federal health officials will require temperature checks for the first time at five major American airports for people arriving from the three West African countries hardest hit by the deadly Ebola virus.

Death of Thomas Eric Duncan in Dallas Fuels Alarm Over Ebola
By MANNY FERNANDEZ and DAVE PHILIPPS
The death Wednesday of Mr. Duncan from Ebola renewed questions about whether a delay in receiving treatment could have played a role and what role it played in the possibility of his spreading the disease to others.

U.S. Steps Up Fight to Block ISIS Volunteers
By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
The Justice Department says it must focus on Americans traveling abroad because they could receive training, become radicalized, and then return to the United States to launch attacks.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S. | STATES IN PLAY
As Energy Boom Ends, a Political Identity Crisis in Alaska
By KIRK JOHNSON
Economic anxiety amid a dwindling oil and gas industry is raising difficult questions about the future. It is also shaping a Senate race in which a Democrat is seeking re-election in a state long dominated by Republicans.

OPINION | OP-DOCS
VIDEO FEATURE: Three Short Films About Peace
They deposed a dictator, helped defeat Communism and started a movement to end famine. In this series, the Liberian activist Leymah Gbowee, the former Polish president Lech Walesa and the rocker Bob Geldof talk about their campaigns for peace.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"Germs have always traveled. The problem now is they can travel with the speed of a jet plane."
HOWARD MARKEL, a professor of the history of medicine at the University of Michigan, on the spread of Ebola beyond West Africa.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Spinning Into Oblivion
Supercomputer simulations show the moment when a pair of neutron stars collide, collapse into a black hole and tear themselves out of the visible universe.
Related Article



VIDEO: The Race for the 4K Television Audience
Retailers are soon going to be making a big push for 4K televisions, but the content is still lacking. Molly Wood visits one company that hopes to become the Netflix of 4K by being there first.
Related Column



VIDEO: 36 Hours in Berkeley, Calif.
The vibrant college community of Berkeley is as rich as ever with food, music and cafe culture - and rest assured that the crusty hippie spirit is also alive and well.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

European Leaders Scramble to Upgrade Response to Ebola Crisis
By ANDREW HIGGINS
Europe has suffered a blow to its self-image of generosity, its efforts to contain Ebola overshadowed by President Obama's announcement that he was sending 3,000 troops to West Africa.

Cave Paintings in Indonesia May Be Among the Oldest Known
By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
The paintings of hands and animals in seven limestone caves on Sulawesi had previously been dismissed as no more than 10,000 years old.

Nobel Laureates Pushed Limits of Microscopes
By KENNETH CHANG
Two Americans and a German were honored for fine-tuning optical microscopy to view live molecular processes.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Gay Marriage Opponents Set to Continue Court Battle
By ERIK ECKHOLM
With dozens of cases pending in the United States, and the Supreme Court expected to take up the issue directly, opponents still see a chance to prevail.

Finding Clues in Genes of 'Exceptional Responders'
By GINA KOLATA
Some people respond to drug treatments much better than others. Now researchers are studying "exceptional responders" in an attempt to help all patients.

Justices Hear Case on Allowing Testimony by Jurors
By ADAM LIPTAK
After a one-sided argument, the Supreme Court appeared unlikely to allow jurors to testify about deliberations, even to expose dishonesty in jury selection.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

ADVERTISEMENT





Politics
Parts of North Carolina Law Limiting Vote Are Restored by Justices
By ADAM LIPTAK and ALAN BLINDER
The Supreme Court issued an unsigned order saying that the state could bar same-day registration and counting votes cast in the wrong precinct.

Spotlighting Constituents to Buoy Congressional Candidates
By ASHLEY PARKER
Stories of casework and efforts to help voters - recounted by the people a politician has helped - can be a candidate's message of warmth and caring.
FIRST DRAFT
Obama Takes His Fiscal Message on the Road
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
The president visits the Los Angeles area on Thursday to talk up his economic plan with young voters.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

DEALBOOK
Obama Had Security Fears on JPMorgan Data Breach
By MICHAEL CORKERY, JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG and DAVID E. SANGER
Officials say no one could answer what the president wanted to know most: What was the motive of the attack?

DEALBOOK
Chinese Return to the Waldorf, With $2 Billion
By DAVID BARBOZA
An obscure Chinese company, Anbang Insurance, is buying the landmark hotel with plans to restore the 83-year-old Art Deco building to its original splendor.

Fed Officials Affirm Rate Outlook, but Seek Flexibility
By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM
The Federal Reserve, pleased that the economy is improving and more Americans are finding jobs, plans to finish its latest bond-buying campaign at the end of October.
Minutes From the Federal Open Market Committee's September Meeting [PDF]


For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

MACHINE LEARNING
Sharper Image From 4K TVs Is a Gimmick Worth Having
By MOLLY WOOD
History shows that better-looking sets with bigger displays will win consumers over, as long as the price is right.
Machine Learning Video: The Race for the 4K Television Audience



STATE OF THE ART
Low Price, High Hopes for OnePlus Phone
By FARHAD MANJOO
The One smartphone, for months the subject of discussion and so far available only by invitation, will be available for preorder this month.

Estonians Embrace Life in a Digital World
By MARK SCOTT
With an microchip-embedded ID card, residents gain access to thousands of public and private services, including banking, medical records and even fishing licenses.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

AN APPRAISAL
Remembering Cigar, a Champion Who Streaked Into History and Hearts
By JOE DRAPE
Cigar, who died Tuesday at age 24, starred in the mid-1990s amid a 16-race winning streak, but he had a much more lasting impact on those who knew him.

N.F.L. Owners May Limit Powers of Roger Goodell
By KEN BELSON and RICHARD SANDOMIR
The authority of Commissioner Roger Goodell to enforce the N.F.L.'s player conduct policy was a subject of discussion at a meeting of team owners.

Looming Even Larger Off the Court
By SCOTT CACCIOLA
Shaquille O'Neal, the former N.B.A. All-Star, has earned millions by promoting a wide variety of products, such as jewelry and soda.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

THEATER REVIEW | 'NOT I,' 'FOOTFALLS,' 'ROCKABY'
Beaten (Down) by the Clock
By BEN BRANTLEY
Lisa Dwan plays all the roles in "Not I," "Footfalls" and "Rockaby," short Beckett plays that are part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival.

THEATER REVIEW | 'SHAKEPEARE'S SONNETS'
Words Felt, if Not Quite Fathomed
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
In Robert Wilson and Rufus Wainwright's "Shakepeare's Sonnets," actors from the Berlin Ensemble caper about to musical accompaniment as the poetry is recited or sung in German.

MUSIC REVIEW
Swept Up in Bach's All-Consuming Passion
By ANTHONY TOMMASINI
The Berlin Philharmonic's performance of "St. Matthew Passion" at the Park Avenue Armory, conducted by Simon Rattle, showed why Bach chose other ways besides opera to tell stories through music.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

Cuomo Reflects in Memoir on Highs and Lows, Both Personal and Political
By THOMAS KAPLAN and SUSANNE CRAIG
Among the revelations contained in Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo's coming memoir: He learned about his divorce from a journalist and blames himself for his father's political demise.

Amid Concern About Virus in U.S., New York Hospital Says It's Ready for the Worst
By TATIANA SCHLOSSBERG
Officials at Belleveue Hospital Center said it had adapted its equipment and procedures to treat patients suspected of carrying the virus, though it was highly unlikely that New York would see a case.

Head of Jails Is Criticized on Violence at Rikers
By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ and MICHAEL WINERIP
Joseph Ponte, the city's correction commissioner, was asked why he had promoted an official at the jail who was involved in reporting distorted data on violence there.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Fashion & Style

For Luxury Watch Buyers, One Just Isn't Enough
By GUY TREBAY
Let techies say wristwatches are dead; that hasn't fazed luxury-timepiece collectors.

Ladyfag Is the Rave of the Future
By ALEX HAWGOOD
The host's inclusive and gleefully risqué circuit of parties has made her a bright light in New York's late-night sparkle.

Invitation or Provocation: Galliano Comes Aboard
By VANESSA FRIEDMAN
Renzo Rosso, fashion mogul, is raising eyebrows and drawing eyes by hiring John Galliano as creative director of Maison Martin Margiela.
For more fashion news, go to NYTimes.com/Fashion »

Obituaries

Robert Mangum, a City and Civil Rights Leader, Dies at 93
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Mr. Mangum, who was New York City's youngest deputy police commissioner, helped found One Hundred Black Men.

Iva Withers, a Standby to the Rescue on Broadway, Dies at 97
By DANIEL E. SLOTNIK
Ms. Withers made a career as a backup for actresses like Julie Harris and Carol Channing.

Sarah Goldberg, 40, TV Actress on '7th Heaven,' Dies
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The actress started as an film extra and was noticed by a crew member.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Mr. Erdogan's Dangerous Game
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The president of Turkey is weakening the fight against the Islamic State by engaging in cynical political calculations.
Ebola Screening at the Airports

New York's Big Chance on Public Defense


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED CONTRIBUTORS
The Problem With Energy Efficiency
By MICHAEL SHELLENBERGER and TED NORDHAUS
It would be a mistake to assume that LEDs will significantly reduce overall energy consumption.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Rules to Vote By
By GAIL COLLINS
It's time for some major-league soul-searching as we look at the candidates running in the midterm elections.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Diversity of Islam
By NICHOLAS KRISTOF
Beware generalizations of Islam or any faith, which sometimes are the religious equivalent of racial profiling.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Oct. 9, 1967, the Latin American guerrilla leader Che Guevara was executed in Bolivia while attempting to incite revolution.
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  • 106 days ago via site
  • 75

Today's Headlines: Ebola Victim's Journey From Liberian War to Fight for Life in U.S.-NYT-PLAMERA 777-12-10-2014-7-SUSPENSO-1-2-3
Today's Headlines Monday, October 6, 2014







IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Media & Advertising | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Ebola Victim's Journey From Liberian War to Fight for Life in U.S.
By KEVIN SACK
What began as a joyful reunion - refugees from African civil strife seeking to rebuild their lives in America - spiraled last week into a national health scare.

Ebola Help for Sierra Leone Is Nearby, but Delayed on the Docks
By ADAM NOSSITER
More than $140,000 worth of medical supplies have been locked inside a dented container at the port in Freetown, Sierra Leone, since Aug. 9.

A Smuggled Girl's Odyssey of False Promises and Fear
By DAMIEN CAVE and FRANCES ROBLES
Cecilia, a 16-year-old Guatemalan seeking a better life in the United States, fell prey to "coyotes," the smugglers who lure migrants, on a trip that devolved into outright abduction.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

WORLD
Unearthing a Barbarous Past in Poland
By RICK LYMAN
The dead here were not only victims of the Soviets and the Nazis, but also victims of Poland's own postwar, Communist-era security forces.

OPINION | ROOM FOR DEBATE
Keeping Bank Data from Hackers
In light of credit card and bank account breaches at JPMorgan and Home Depot, what will it take to make financial data secure?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
""Sometimes I think my father just wasn't thinking through the consequences of leaving."
MAGDALENA RAYMUNDO, who shares a nearly $13,000 debt for a journey from Guatemala to the United States that her father and brother took with smugglers.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Rebel Without a Clause
When baseball star Curt Flood rejected a trade in 1969, he challenged America's pastime and helped spark a revolution that rippled beyond the game.
Related Article



VIDEO: Love and Independence in East Providence
Lori Sousa knew Peter Maxmean was her soul mate when they first met, and now they are showing how people with intellectual disabilities can live, work and thrive in a community.
Related Article



VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Rick Owens's Paris Fashion Week Show
The Rick Owens designs took a sharp turn, to gauzy, diaphanous spring dresses that seemed like clouds around the wearer's body.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

In Brazil's Election, Incumbent Emerges as Front-Runner but Faces Runoff
By SIMON ROMERO
President Dilma Rousseff emerged on Sunday as the front-runner, but she failed to win a majority of the vote, opening the way for a runoff with Aécio Neves.

New President of Afghanistan Welcomes Back Times Reporter
By AZAM AHMED
Matthew Rosenberg, who was expelled from the country in August, will be allowed to return effective immediately, according to the Afghan government.

ISIS' Ammunition Is Shown to Have Origins in U.S. and China
By C. J. CHIVERS
An analysis suggests that ammunition transferred into Syria and Iraq to help stabilize governments has instead passed from the governments to the jihadists.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

California Voters to Decide on Sending Fewer Criminals to Prison
By ERIK ECKHOLM
The state that once embraced the nation's toughest three-strikes law is now searching for a way to scale back its heavy reliance on incarceration.
Ebola Patient in Dallas 'Fighting for His Life,' C.D.C. Director Says
By MANNY FERNANDEZ and BRIAN KNOWLTON
The director said Thomas E. Duncan of Liberia was in critical condition as the police continued to scramble to contain the spread of the disease.

Suffolk Downs Is Put Out to Pasture
By JESS BIDGOOD
There will be no more live racing at the Massachusetts track, which in its heyday hosted crowds of 35,000 people, cheering on legends like Seabiscuit.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

An Obama Ally Parts With Him on War Powers
By JONATHAN WEISMAN
Senator Tim Kaine told the president that if he intended to go to war with ISIS, he would have to ask Congress's permission. The two have been battling ever since.

THE UPSHOT
Republicans Maintain Edge in Senate Races, Poll Finds
By NATE COHN
But the latest YouGov panel suggests Democrats are hanging tough in Colorado and Iowa and doing a better job of mobilizing voters.

FIRST
Mitt Isn't Ready to Call It Quits
By MARK LEIBOVICH
Far from the scrum of the campaign trail, the former nominee reflects on the calls for his return.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

To Reach China, LinkedIn Plays by Local Rules
By PAUL MOZUR and VINDU GOEL
The professional social network's Chinese-language version, which lacks certain features of Western versions, seems to have the tacit approval of China's government.

If the Word 'How' Is Trademarked, Does This Headline Need a ™ ?
By JONATHAN MAHLER
An unlikely word, one intended to highlight superior methods, has become the center of a legal struggle between a management guru and a yogurt manufacturer.

Hong Kong Wealth Gap on Display in Protests
By NEIL GOUGH
Dissatisfaction with a growing wealth gap in Hong Kong has helped fuel recent public demonstrations, which could shake the city's immediate and long-term stability.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Hewlett-Packard Is Said to Be Planning a Split of Businesses
By QUENTIN HARDY and DAVID GELLES
The company is expected to divide into two entities - one that consists of its PC business and another that is more enterprise-focused, people familiar with the matter said.

Technology Takes the Wheel
By AARON M. KESSLER
By the end of the decade, many automakers will offer vehicles that can take control on the highway, even passing and exiting on their own.

Facebook's Bus Drivers Seek Union
By STEVEN GREENHOUSE
Some of the drivers who work for a shuttle bus contractor and put in 15-hour split shifts taking Facebook employees to and from work are seeking representation by the Teamsters.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

ROYALS 8, ANGELS 3
Royals Skip Extra Innings for a Change and Sweep the Angels Away
By TIM ROHAN
Kansas City shook off an early 1-0 deficit and rolled to an easy victory, advancing to the American League Championship Series, where it will face the Baltimore Orioles.

Speeding Along Behind an Unlikely Duo
By TIM ROHAN
The Royals plucked Jarrod Dyson and Terrance Gore from obscurity because of their speed, and they have become heroes of the Royals' first playoff run in 29 years.

ON BASEBALL
Zero Room to Spare for Teetering Nationals
By TYLER KEPNER
The Washington Nationals are in danger of another first-round knockout after earning the top seed in the National League playoffs.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

THEATER REVIEW | 'THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME'
Plotting the Grid of Sensory Overload
By BEN BRANTLEY
Simon Stephens adapts Mark Haddon's best-selling novel in "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time."

A Prima Donna Stretches in More Daring Roles
By MICHAEL COOPER
Anna Netrebko, one of opera's reigning stars, is singing the dark and demanding role of Lady Macbeth in Verdi's "Macbeth" at the Met, to acclaim.

Those Were the Days, Not Simple or All Sweet
By DAVE ITZKOFF
Norman Lear, the creator of boundary-crossing TV comedies like "All in the Family," has written a memoir, "Even This I Get to Experience," reflecting on his 92 years.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

New York Is Cataloging, and Returning, Bloody Relics of 1971 Attica Assault
By SAM ROBERTS
This year, state officials began cataloging the bloodstained uniforms of both guards and inmates from the four-day uprising at Attica prison in 1971 to determine which items could be returned to the victims' families.

Offering Help and Hope as Ebola Epidemic Unfolds
By ALAN FEUER
Congregations in Clifton, a section of Staten Island with a large Liberian population, are coming together with donations and prayers for loved ones in West Africa struggling to survive the deadly epidemic.
New York City Steps Up Preparations to Be Ready for Ebola Cases
By MARC SANTORA
Dispatchers for 911 now ask about recent travels to West Africa, and emergency workers are being trained to use protective gear safely.
Documents: Advisory Sent to Emergency Medical Workers | Fire Department's Procedures for Wearing Pro tective Gear


For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Media & Advertising

THE MEDIA EQUATION
The Washington Post Regains Its Place at the Table
By DAVID CARR
Jeff Bezos's willingness to finance hiring new employees - over 100 so far this year - has created an atmosphere of confidence and financial stability supported by strong journalistic leadership.
N.B.A. Is Said to Continue Network Deals
By RICHARD SANDOMIR
The league is expected to announce new media deals with ESPN and Turner Sports on Monday that will nearly triple the annual average rights fees of the current contract.

Movie Watchdog Group Gives Out Its First Seal of Approval
By MICHAEL CIEPLY
Beginning with the Disney film "Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day," Common Sense Media plans to award its seal to as many as 10 family-friendly films a year.
For more media and advertising news, go to NYTimes.com/Media »

Obituaries

Yuri Lyubimov, Experimental Director of the Russian Stage, Is Dead at 97
By DAVID BELCHER
Mr. Lyubimov, who founded the experimental Taganka Theater in Moscow in 1964, led productions that once prompted the Soviet government to send him into exile.

Paul Revere, Rocker Who Founded the Raiders, Dies at 76
By ASHLEY SOUTHALL
Mr. Revere, the band's organist, was known for his manic energy onstage and for his tri-corner hats.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Yes to Marijuana Ballot Measures
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Three proposed initiatives would help to create a saner recreational-use landscape.
India and America, Beginning Again

The First to Fear Gunplay

Bad Credit? Big Problem


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Pedophilia: A Disorder, Not a Crime
By MARGO KAPLAN
The focus of our laws should shift from punishment to treatment.

Voodoo Economics, the Next Generation
By PAUL KRUGMAN
That old, Reagan-era black magic is making a comeback.
OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
A Better Way to Encourage Charity
By RAY D. MADOFF
Private foundations are warehousing wealth, instead of giving it away.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Oct. 6, 1981, President Anwar Sadat of Egypt was shot to death by Islamic militants while reviewing a military parade.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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N.Y. Today: New York City Steps Up Preparations to Be Ready for Ebola Cases; New York Is Cataloging, and Returning, Bloody Relics of 1971 Attica Assault
Monday, October 6, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Changing the Rules for Consent on Campus

Good morning on this soon-to-be sunny Monday.
Last week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordered the State University of New York to overhaul the guidelines on sexual assault on all of its 64 campuses.
When the new rules kick in, students will be required to receive active consent before all sexual activity.
That is, only a yes will mean yes.
The shift ties into a national trend - around the country, colleges and universities have begun to reconsider their policies toward sexual assault as victims come out with their stories and advocates push for change.
We asked Ariel Kaminer, who covers higher education for The Times, how the shift toward affirmative consent might play out on campus.
For one, it sets a tougher standard for consent, making potential cases of sexual assault easier to prosecute.
More of the day's news »



News
New York City Steps Up Preparations to Be Ready for Ebola Cases
By MARC SANTORA
Dispatchers for 911 now ask about recent travels to West Africa, and emergency workers are being trained to use protective gear safely.
Documents: Advisory Sent to Emergency Medical Workers | Fire Department's Procedures for Wearing Protective Gear



Offering Help and Hope as Ebola Epidemic Unfolds
By ALAN FEUER
Congregations in Clifton, a section of Staten Island with a large Liberian population, are coming together with donations and prayers for loved ones in West Africa struggling to survive the deadly epidemic.

New York Is Cataloging, and Returning, Bloody Relics of 1971 Attica Assault
By SAM ROBERTS
This year, state officials began cataloging the bloodstained uniforms of both guards and inmates from the four-day uprising at Attica prison in 1971 to determine which items could be returned to the victims' families.

THE BUY-IN
Casino Plan Frays Ties Between Amish and Neighbors
By JESSE McKINLEY
The possibility that a gambling resort could be built in the town of Tyre has aroused opposition principally from the area's sect members.

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Features

Facing Many Obstacles, Bike Sharing Slowly Gains Traction Upstate
By JANE GOTTLIEB
Cycling advocates have to contend with a dearth of designated bike lanes and treacherous traffic.

Columnist
THE WORKING LIFE
In Living Wage Law's Evolution, a Peek at Policymaking in the de Blasio Era
By RACHEL L. SWARNS
While it is a win for workers, the order signed last week by Mayor Bill de Blasio offers more exemptions and covers fewer sectors than he originally promised.

Sports

GIANTS 30, FALCONS 20
Rookies Lead Rally Over Falcons, and Giants Could Get Used to It
By BILL PENNINGTON
The rookie Andre Williams scored on a 3-yard run, and Odell Beckham Jr., a first-round draft choice who had been hampered by a hamstring injury, scored the go-ahead touchdown.

CHARGERS 31, JETS 0
Jets Bench Geno Smith in a Loss That Doesn't Sit Too Well
By BILLY WITZ
The Jets' loss to the Chargers revealed that while the team's problems may start at quarterback, they don't end there.

With Nets, a New Guard Finds Old Ties
By ANDREW KEH
The Nets' Andrei Kirilenko, 33, and Sergey Karasev, 20, share a basketball connection that started years ago in Russia.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia
PHOTOGRAPHS: New York Panorama
Every Sunday in the Metropolitan section, a photographer offers a new slice of New York.

Arts

THEATER REVIEW | 'THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME'
Plotting the Grid of Sensory Overload
By BEN BRANTLEY
Simon Stephens adapts Mark Haddon's best-selling novel in "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time."

Tapestries From the '60s, Woven Anew
By ROBIN POGREBIN
Sheila Hicks discusses the challenges of remaking two tapestries she originally designed for the Ford Foundation building in 1967.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
Lightning Fast With His Feet and His Jokes
By MIKE HALE
The Brooklyn Academy of Music holds a retrospective of the films of the Chinese actor-director Stephen Chow.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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N.Y. Today: 35 Overlooked City Parks to Get Makeovers; After Death of New Jersey Boy From Enterovirus 68, Worry Grows Among Parents
Tuesday, October 7, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Trying to Catch Cuomo

Good morning on this possibly wet Tuesday.
Four weeks from today, there will be an election for governor of New York.
What do you do if you're down by 30 points in the polls with four weeks left?
If you're Rob Astorino, the Republican trying to stop Gov. Andrew Cuomo from quietly steamrollering his way to a second term, pretty much anything.
A campaign appearance in a sneaker store with the indicted governor of Texas? Sure.
Call the governor a unicorn killer? Yes, in response to Cuomo ads that the Astorino camp called outrageously false.
Hop over to Pennsylvania to tour a hydrofracking operation? Mr. Astorino plans to, and challenged Mr. Cuomo to do the same.
More of the day's news »



News

35 New York City Parks to Get Makeovers
By LISA W. FODERARO
Mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to announce plans to spend $130 million on play areas in low-income areas across the city.

After Death of New Jersey Boy From Enterovirus 68, Worry Grows Among Parents
By MARC SANTORA
The virus, which has existed for decades, was never known to have spread widely until this year, and the fact that there's little treatment for it is fueling concerns.

De Blasio Stands Behind Aide Who Omitted Boyfriend on Background Check Form
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Mayor Bill de Blasio called the aide, Rachel Noerdlinger, "a good public servant" and said she did not intend to deceive by failing to disclose her relationship.

Waldorf-Astoria to Be Sold in a $1.95 Billion Deal
By CHARLES V BAGLI
Hilton Worldwide, the seller, will continue to operate the hotel under a 100-year management contract with Anbang Insurance Group of China.

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Columnist

THE APPRAISAL
From a Father's Anguish Comes a Plan to Help Mentally Ill Inmates
By MATT A.V. CHABAN
Francis J. Greenburger, a real estate developer and manager, wants to open a treatment center for convicts that will provide an alternative to incarceration.
More Appraisal Columns



Sports

Young Left Wing a Surprise Addition to Rangers' Roster
By ALLAN KREDA
Anthony Duclair, 19, "earned the right to start with us" after a strong training camp, Coach Alain Vigneault said.

Giants' Rashad Jennings Out Indefinitely With Sprained Left Knee
By BILL PENNINGTON
The absence of Jennings, who took himself out of Sunday's game with what appeared to be a minor injury, jeopardizes the team's balance on offense.

ON PRO FOOTBALL
Jets Spiral Deeper Into Futility
By BEN SHPIGEL
At 1-4, with matchups against Peyton Manning and Tom Brady up next, a team that spent nearly two years building up its image once again has a perception problem.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

VIDEO: Style in Crown Heights, Brooklyn
Mishon Mishon, a natural hairstylist who used to have a business in Crown Heights, describes herself as a "trendsetter or style provocateur."

Arts

ARCHITECTURE REVIEW
Building Hope and Nurturing Into Housing
By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN
The new Sugar Hill subsidized housing complex in Upper Manhattan goes beyond even the more ambitious developments by providing a school and a children's museum.

Catching Broadway on Camera
By LORNE MANLY
The Broadway production of "Of Mice and Men," filmed live in July, will have its movie theater premiere on Nov. 6.

ARTSBEAT
Modest Sales for the Start of Sting's Musical 'The Last Ship'
By PATRICK HEALY
The show, Sting's first foray into musical theater, sold modestly in its first set of preview performances last week, according to box office data.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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  • 106 days ago via site
  • 63

Today's Headlines: Ebola's Cultural Casualty: Hugs in Hands-On Liberia-NYT-PALMERA777-05-10-14-6-SUSPENSO-16-17-18
.
Today's Headlines Sunday, October 5, 2014







IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Magazine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Ebola's Cultural Casualty: Hugs in Hands-On Liberia
By HELENE COOPER
As Ebola ravages West Africa, Liberians are losing an integral part of their culture, in which the double-cheek kiss was once the standard greeting.

Democrats Lean Heavily on PACs in Coordinated Push to Counter G.O.P.
By ASHLEY PARKER and NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Democrats are more reliant than they have ever been on the very kind of big-money groups they have spent years trying to outlaw.

THIS LAND
A Couple Gaining Independence, and Finding a Bond
By DAN BARRY
After a federal inquiry in Rhode Island turned the workplace of their repetitive jobs upside down, a couple with intellectual disabilities is marrying, learning to budget and adjusting to a new freedom.
Video: Love and Independence in East Providence


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Editors' Picks

WORLD
In Ukraine, Civilians in Crossfire
By ANDREW ROTH
Civilian casualties have soared as separatist rebels with heavy artillery attack the airport in Donetsk and Ukrainian forces respond with often ill-directed fire.

OPINION | SUNDAY REVIEW
Who Are 'We the People'?
By ERIC L. LEWIS
If corporations are legal "persons," why aren't Muslim detainees?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"Our youth are being hoodwinked and hijacked by their rhetoric. We cannot just say ISIS is bad. That's not an option. We need an outlet."
OMAR SAQR, 25, the youth coordinator for the Noor Islamic Cultural Center in Dublin, Ohio, describing how the United States needs to combat recruiting efforts of Muslim Americans by the Islamic State.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Spouse, and Muse
Illustrators Elisabeth Alba and Scott Murphy often use each other as models for their drawings. That intense study of each others features makes each think about the other in a different way.

VIDEO: Ask Well: An Ebola Q. and A.
Donald G. McNeil Jr. answers reader questions about the Ebola virus.

VIDEO: What Made Me | April Bloomfield
The renowned chef April Bloomfield recounts her youthful ambition to be a cop and how she worked her way to the top of her field.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

ADVERTISEMENT


World

Hong Kong Leader's Warning Renews Protesters' Zeal as Crowds Swell
By AUSTIN RAMZY and ALAN WONG
Tens of thousands gathered outside the government headquarters after the territory's leader said "all actions necessary" would be taken to allow government workers to return to work.
Triad Links to Attack on Protesters Raise Old Questions

Video: One Week Later



Scrutinized for Handling of Protests, Police Have Own Troubles
By KEITH BRADSHER
Police officers in Hong Kong spoke of their frustration at bearing the brunt of protesters' anger, and at having their hands tied by government policy.

In Golan, Imagined Risks Become All Too Real
By JODI RUDOREN
The Golan Heights, long Israel's quietest frontier, is now one of its most unpredictable, and residents are training to handle the worst.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

U.S. Is Trying to Counter ISIS' Efforts to Lure Alienated Young Muslims
By ERIC SCHMITT
The Obama administration is trying to stanch the flow of radicalized young Muslim Americans traveling to Syria to join Islamic State fighters.
As U.S. Ebola Fears Widen, Reports of Possible Cases Grow
By MANNY FERNANDEZ and ROBERT PEAR
Federal officials have assessed more than 100 potential cases, but the only confirmed case is in Dallas, where the condition of the man with Ebola was changed to critical.
Retracing the Steps of the Dallas Ebola Patient



Edgar Allan Poe's Feud With Boston? Nevermore
By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
The author who mocked the Frog Pond will join Boston's literary big fish with the unveiling of a statue in the city.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

ADVERTISEMENT





Politics
Biden Apologizes to Turkish President
By SEBNEM ARSU
Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. apologized to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for remarks suggesting that Turkey helped facilitate the rise of the Islamic State.

Supreme Court's Robust New Session Could Define Legacy of Chief Justice
By ADAM LIPTAK
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. is entering his 10th term, and it is one that could define the legacy of the court he leads.

In Washington State, Political Stand Puts Schools in a Bind
By MOTOKO RICH
The state refuses to base teacher evaluations on student scores, which triggers an outdated standard: that every student be proficient in reading and math.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

THE UPSHOT
Six Years Later, We're Still Litigating the Bailouts. Here's What We Know.
By NEIL IRWIN
America remains deeply conflicted about federal regulators' crisis response.

For the Wolf of Luxury, a Chance to Be a Lamb
By VANESSA FRIEDMAN
With a new art museum and performance space, Bernard Arnault and LVMH are offering Paris a big gift - one that also has implications for the giver.

With Robust Economy, Poland Navigates Around Eastern Europe's Strains
By RICK LYMAN
With Russia again seeking to exert its influence and much of Europe struggling to recover fully from the deep downturn of recent years, Poland has become a leading symbol of stability.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Ignition Defect Again Prompts Recalls From G.M.
By CHRISTOPHER JENSEN
General Motors announced three more recalls on Saturday, pushing the company's total to more than 26.4 million vehicles recalled this year in the United States.

TECHNOPHORIA
Just the Facts? This Dossier Goes Further
By NATASHA SINGER
A company starts with data it compiles on journalists, then makes its own suppositions in its profiles of them.

THE WORKOLOGIST
When Your Ex-Boss Haunts Twitter
By ROB WALKER
A reader who followed an ex-supervisor on Twitter and Instagram asks the Workologist how to break those ties.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

GIANTS 2, NATIONALS 1, 18 INNINGS
18 Innings, Six Hours, One Huge Win for the Giants
By TIM ROHAN
Brandon Belt's home run lifted San Francisco past Washington in the longest game by time - 6 hours 23 minutes - in major league postseason history.

DODGERS 3, CARDINALS 2
Kemp and Greinke Help Dodgers Even Series With Cardinals
By TYLER KEPNER
Zack Greinke buzzed through the seventh with a shutout intact, and Matt Kemp, who missed Los Angeles's N.L.C.S. loss to St. Louis last year, hit a tiebreaking homer in the eighth.

Canadian District Goes to School on Concussions
By JEFF Z. KLEIN
A school district near Toronto has begun a program to teach students about the risks of traumatic brain injuries in sports.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Muse Steps Away
By ROSLYN SULCAS
Wendy Whelan, a principal dancer with New York City Ballet, will give her farewell performance on Oct. 18.

CROSS CUTS
Specializing in Ordinary Ordeals
By A. O. SCOTT
"Two Days, One Night," the new film from the Dardenne brothers, follows a woman who must ask her co-workers to sacrifice their bonuses for her.

Creating Drama 'by the Seat of Our Pants'
By BILL CARTER
After the death of Damian Lewis's character last season, "Homeland" returns with a new location assignment (and postpartum depression) for Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes).
TV Review: 'Homeland'


For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

Airline Passenger Does Not Have Ebola Virus, Hospital Officials in New Jersey Say
By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS
A man who vomited while on a flight from Brussels to Newark, N.J., on Saturday was taken to a hospital to be tested for the deadly virus.

DEGREES AND DIFFICULTY
Community College Students Face a Very Long Road to Graduation
By GINIA BELLAFANTE
For the 50,000 students at LaGuardia Community College, the challenges can seem insurmountable.
Video: The Art of the Degree



At Cuomo Campaign Rallies, a Focus on Women's Issues
By THOMAS KAPLAN
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, on a tour of upstate New York, sought to draw a contrast with his Republican challenger, Rob Astorino, on issues like abortion rights and domestic violence.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Magazine

Andre Braugher, the Undercover Comedian of 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine'
By STEPHEN RODRICK
After roles ranging from Henry V to 'Homicide' detective, America's most unlikely funny man has his biggest hit.

The Revelations of Marilynne Robinson
By WYATT MASON
In her fourth novel, "Lila," the author returns to the mythical town of Gilead - and her exploration of the sacredness in things.

LIVES
A New Mother's Fear About Coughing Fits
By EULA BISS
If I had pertussis, how many people would I infect?
For more from the Sunday magazine, go to NYTimes.com/Magazine »

Obituaries

Jean-Claude Duvalier, 'Baby Doc' of Haiti, Dies at 63
By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD
Mr. Duvalier succeeded his father, François, in the role they called "president for life," and he went on to lead Haiti with a shocking brutality.
A Former Dictator Reappears in Haiti (Jan. 16, 2011)



Jerrie Mock, First Solo Female Pilot to Circumnavigate the Globe, Dies at 88
By BRUCE WEBER
When asked why she had undertaken such a treacherous journey alone, Ms. Mock replied, "It was about time a woman did it."
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Reining In Egypt's Military Aid
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
It's time for the United States to disabuse Egyptian leaders of the notion that they are entitled to aid in perpetuity.
Silicon Valley's Diversity Problem

Still Dawdling on Trucker Training


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OPINION
A Debt Collector's Day
By JAKE HALPERN
Poor people, pitted against poorer people, to benefit the rich.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Too Many Secrets, Not Enough Service
By MAUREEN DOWD
Did gender play a role in Julia Pierson losing her job as the chief executive of the Secret Service?
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Church's Gay Obsession
By FRANK BRUNI
A rash of cruel firings shows how selectively Catholic leaders enforce their laws.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On October 5, 1947, in the first televised White House address, President Truman asked Americans to refrain from eating meat on Tuesdays and poultry on Thursdays to help stockpile grain for starving people in Europe.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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Today's Headlines: Ebola's Cultural Casualty: Hugs in Hands-On Liberia
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Today's Headlines Sunday, October 5, 2014







IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Magazine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Ebola's Cultural Casualty: Hugs in Hands-On Liberia
By HELENE COOPER
As Ebola ravages West Africa, Liberians are losing an integral part of their culture, in which the double-cheek kiss was once the standard greeting.

Democrats Lean Heavily on PACs in Coordinated Push to Counter G.O.P.
By ASHLEY PARKER and NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Democrats are more reliant than they have ever been on the very kind of big-money groups they have spent years trying to outlaw.

THIS LAND
A Couple Gaining Independence, and Finding a Bond
By DAN BARRY
After a federal inquiry in Rhode Island turned the workplace of their repetitive jobs upside down, a couple with intellectual disabilities is marrying, learning to budget and adjusting to a new freedom.
Video: Love and Independence in East Providence


For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

ADVERTISEMENT


Editors' Picks

WORLD
In Ukraine, Civilians in Crossfire
By ANDREW ROTH
Civilian casualties have soared as separatist rebels with heavy artillery attack the airport in Donetsk and Ukrainian forces respond with often ill-directed fire.

OPINION | SUNDAY REVIEW
Who Are 'We the People'?
By ERIC L. LEWIS
If corporations are legal "persons," why aren't Muslim detainees?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"Our youth are being hoodwinked and hijacked by their rhetoric. We cannot just say ISIS is bad. That's not an option. We need an outlet."
OMAR SAQR, 25, the youth coordinator for the Noor Islamic Cultural Center in Dublin, Ohio, describing how the United States needs to combat recruiting efforts of Muslim Americans by the Islamic State.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Spouse, and Muse
Illustrators Elisabeth Alba and Scott Murphy often use each other as models for their drawings. That intense study of each others features makes each think about the other in a different way.

VIDEO: Ask Well: An Ebola Q. and A.
Donald G. McNeil Jr. answers reader questions about the Ebola virus.

VIDEO: What Made Me | April Bloomfield
The renowned chef April Bloomfield recounts her youthful ambition to be a cop and how she worked her way to the top of her field.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

ADVERTISEMENT


World

Hong Kong Leader's Warning Renews Protesters' Zeal as Crowds Swell
By AUSTIN RAMZY and ALAN WONG
Tens of thousands gathered outside the government headquarters after the territory's leader said "all actions necessary" would be taken to allow government workers to return to work.
Triad Links to Attack on Protesters Raise Old Questions

Video: One Week Later



Scrutinized for Handling of Protests, Police Have Own Troubles
By KEITH BRADSHER
Police officers in Hong Kong spoke of their frustration at bearing the brunt of protesters' anger, and at having their hands tied by government policy.

In Golan, Imagined Risks Become All Too Real
By JODI RUDOREN
The Golan Heights, long Israel's quietest frontier, is now one of its most unpredictable, and residents are training to handle the worst.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

U.S. Is Trying to Counter ISIS' Efforts to Lure Alienated Young Muslims
By ERIC SCHMITT
The Obama administration is trying to stanch the flow of radicalized young Muslim Americans traveling to Syria to join Islamic State fighters.
As U.S. Ebola Fears Widen, Reports of Possible Cases Grow
By MANNY FERNANDEZ and ROBERT PEAR
Federal officials have assessed more than 100 potential cases, but the only confirmed case is in Dallas, where the condition of the man with Ebola was changed to critical.
Retracing the Steps of the Dallas Ebola Patient



Edgar Allan Poe's Feud With Boston? Nevermore
By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
The author who mocked the Frog Pond will join Boston's literary big fish with the unveiling of a statue in the city.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

ADVERTISEMENT





Politics
Biden Apologizes to Turkish President
By SEBNEM ARSU
Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. apologized to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for remarks suggesting that Turkey helped facilitate the rise of the Islamic State.

Supreme Court's Robust New Session Could Define Legacy of Chief Justice
By ADAM LIPTAK
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. is entering his 10th term, and it is one that could define the legacy of the court he leads.

In Washington State, Political Stand Puts Schools in a Bind
By MOTOKO RICH
The state refuses to base teacher evaluations on student scores, which triggers an outdated standard: that every student be proficient in reading and math.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

THE UPSHOT
Six Years Later, We're Still Litigating the Bailouts. Here's What We Know.
By NEIL IRWIN
America remains deeply conflicted about federal regulators' crisis response.

For the Wolf of Luxury, a Chance to Be a Lamb
By VANESSA FRIEDMAN
With a new art museum and performance space, Bernard Arnault and LVMH are offering Paris a big gift - one that also has implications for the giver.

With Robust Economy, Poland Navigates Around Eastern Europe's Strains
By RICK LYMAN
With Russia again seeking to exert its influence and much of Europe struggling to recover fully from the deep downturn of recent years, Poland has become a leading symbol of stability.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Ignition Defect Again Prompts Recalls From G.M.
By CHRISTOPHER JENSEN
General Motors announced three more recalls on Saturday, pushing the company's total to more than 26.4 million vehicles recalled this year in the United States.

TECHNOPHORIA
Just the Facts? This Dossier Goes Further
By NATASHA SINGER
A company starts with data it compiles on journalists, then makes its own suppositions in its profiles of them.

THE WORKOLOGIST
When Your Ex-Boss Haunts Twitter
By ROB WALKER
A reader who followed an ex-supervisor on Twitter and Instagram asks the Workologist how to break those ties.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

GIANTS 2, NATIONALS 1, 18 INNINGS
18 Innings, Six Hours, One Huge Win for the Giants
By TIM ROHAN
Brandon Belt's home run lifted San Francisco past Washington in the longest game by time - 6 hours 23 minutes - in major league postseason history.

DODGERS 3, CARDINALS 2
Kemp and Greinke Help Dodgers Even Series With Cardinals
By TYLER KEPNER
Zack Greinke buzzed through the seventh with a shutout intact, and Matt Kemp, who missed Los Angeles's N.L.C.S. loss to St. Louis last year, hit a tiebreaking homer in the eighth.

Canadian District Goes to School on Concussions
By JEFF Z. KLEIN
A school district near Toronto has begun a program to teach students about the risks of traumatic brain injuries in sports.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Muse Steps Away
By ROSLYN SULCAS
Wendy Whelan, a principal dancer with New York City Ballet, will give her farewell performance on Oct. 18.

CROSS CUTS
Specializing in Ordinary Ordeals
By A. O. SCOTT
"Two Days, One Night," the new film from the Dardenne brothers, follows a woman who must ask her co-workers to sacrifice their bonuses for her.

Creating Drama 'by the Seat of Our Pants'
By BILL CARTER
After the death of Damian Lewis's character last season, "Homeland" returns with a new location assignment (and postpartum depression) for Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes).
TV Review: 'Homeland'


For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

Airline Passenger Does Not Have Ebola Virus, Hospital Officials in New Jersey Say
By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS
A man who vomited while on a flight from Brussels to Newark, N.J., on Saturday was taken to a hospital to be tested for the deadly virus.

DEGREES AND DIFFICULTY
Community College Students Face a Very Long Road to Graduation
By GINIA BELLAFANTE
For the 50,000 students at LaGuardia Community College, the challenges can seem insurmountable.
Video: The Art of the Degree



At Cuomo Campaign Rallies, a Focus on Women's Issues
By THOMAS KAPLAN
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, on a tour of upstate New York, sought to draw a contrast with his Republican challenger, Rob Astorino, on issues like abortion rights and domestic violence.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Magazine

Andre Braugher, the Undercover Comedian of 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine'
By STEPHEN RODRICK
After roles ranging from Henry V to 'Homicide' detective, America's most unlikely funny man has his biggest hit.

The Revelations of Marilynne Robinson
By WYATT MASON
In her fourth novel, "Lila," the author returns to the mythical town of Gilead - and her exploration of the sacredness in things.

LIVES
A New Mother's Fear About Coughing Fits
By EULA BISS
If I had pertussis, how many people would I infect?
For more from the Sunday magazine, go to NYTimes.com/Magazine »

Obituaries

Jean-Claude Duvalier, 'Baby Doc' of Haiti, Dies at 63
By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD
Mr. Duvalier succeeded his father, François, in the role they called "president for life," and he went on to lead Haiti with a shocking brutality.
A Former Dictator Reappears in Haiti (Jan. 16, 2011)



Jerrie Mock, First Solo Female Pilot to Circumnavigate the Globe, Dies at 88
By BRUCE WEBER
When asked why she had undertaken such a treacherous journey alone, Ms. Mock replied, "It was about time a woman did it."
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Reining In Egypt's Military Aid
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
It's time for the United States to disabuse Egyptian leaders of the notion that they are entitled to aid in perpetuity.
Silicon Valley's Diversity Problem

Still Dawdling on Trucker Training


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OPINION
A Debt Collector's Day
By JAKE HALPERN
Poor people, pitted against poorer people, to benefit the rich.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Too Many Secrets, Not Enough Service
By MAUREEN DOWD
Did gender play a role in Julia Pierson losing her job as the chief executive of the Secret Service?
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Church's Gay Obsession
By FRANK BRUNI
A rash of cruel firings shows how selectively Catholic leaders enforce their laws.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On October 5, 1947, in the first televised White House address, President Truman asked Americans to refrain from eating meat on Tuesdays and poultry on Thursdays to help stockpile grain for starving people in Europe.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




FOLLOW US: Facebook | | Pinterest

Access The New York Times from anywhere with our suite of apps:
iPhone® | iPad® | Android | All

Save 15% at The NYTimes Store »
Have questions? Help Section »
Visit our mobile website at m.nyt.com »


About This Email
This is an automated email. Please do not reply directly to this email.
You received this message because you signed up for NYTimes.com's Today's Headlines newsletter. As a member of the TRUSTe privacy program, we are committed to protecting your privacy.
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Copyright 2014 | The New York Times Company | NYTimes.com 620 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10018
N.Y. Today: Airline Passenger Does Not Have Ebola Virus, Hospital Officials in New Jersey Say; Community College Students Face a Very Long Road to Graduation
Sunday, October 5, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts | Weddings

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

News

Airline Passenger Does Not Have Ebola Virus, Hospital Officials in New Jersey Say
By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS
A man who vomited while on a flight from Brussels to Newark, N.J., on Saturday was taken to a hospital to be tested for the deadly virus.

DEGREES AND DIFFICULTY
Community College Students Face a Very Long Road to Graduation
By GINIA BELLAFANTE
For the 50,000 students at LaGuardia Community College, the challenges can seem insurmountable.
Video: The Art of the Degree



At Cuomo Campaign Rallies, a Focus on Women's Issues
By THOMAS KAPLAN
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, on a tour of upstate New York, sought to draw a contrast with his Republican challenger, Rob Astorino, on issues like abortion rights and domestic violence.

At Comic Con, a Fanfare for the Fanboys
By LAURA PARKER
An orchestral performance for the lead-up to New York Comic Con will include contemporary classical works alongside music from film, television and video games.

ADVERTISEMENT






Features

NEIGHBORHOOD JOINT | FOREST HILLS
The 30-Second Silk Road Disco Party at Salute
By LEAH KOENIG
The Bukharian kosher restaurant with a vast array of kebabs has a birthday ritual, including pulsing green strobes, that transforms the dining room.
More Articles in This Series



CHARACTER STUDY
The Gossip Guy
By COREY KILGANNON
The longtime press agent R. Couri Hay learned from "the great spinmeisters of the world," he said, including Earl Wilson, Aileen Mehle and James Winston Brady.
More Character Study Columns



Sports

Two Jets, Two Friends, Together Through Life and Through Football
By BEN SHPIGEL
Darrin Walls and Rontez Miles were friends and teammates playing football in high school, and now with the Jets.

In the Giants' Locker Room, Leadership Sits All in a Row
By BILL PENNINGTON
Four side-by-side lockers in one corner of the Giants' locker room have emerged as a distinct power corridor, a kind of leadership command center for a team with more than 20 new players.

ON PRO BASKETBALL
At West Point, Knicks Seek Something Different: Discipline
By SCOTT CACCIOLA
With a new coach and a new system, the Knicks trained at West Point during the first week of preseason practice in an attempt to pick up some positive attributes by osmosis.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

ADVERTISEMENT


Multimedia

ALBUM
In Bicycle Race, Breaking Away in Stages
By PETER MADSEN
This year's East Coast Messenger Stage Race shifted from a tempered Tour-de-France-style endeavor to a frantic alley cat race.

Arts

Muse Steps Away
By ROSLYN SULCAS
Wendy Whelan, a principal dancer with New York City Ballet, will give her farewell performance on Oct. 18.

A Young Comic Joins an Exclusive Club
By DAVE ITZKOFF
Aziz Ansari, a stand-up comedian known to television viewers from "Parks and Recreation," is playing Madison Square Garden on his first arena tour.

A Brooklyn Home for Artists, With Love
By ALEXIS SOLOSKI
The Bushwick Starr, a dingy, elegant but strangely welcoming performance space in Brooklyn, has become a bright spot on the Off Off Broadway map.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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Visit TimesTalks

The Scoop offers lists of our favorite New York restaurants, bars, events and experiences.
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| Contact
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Today's Headlines: Supreme Court Delivers Tacit Win to Gay Marriage
Today's Headlines Tuesday, October 7, 2014







IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Science | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Supreme Court Delivers Tacit Win to Gay Marriage
By ADAM LIPTAK
The Supreme Court's decision was a major surprise and suggests that the justices are not going to intercede in the wave of decisions in favor of same-sex marriage, at least until a federal appeals court upholds a state ban.

Ebola Infects Spanish Nurse, a First in West
By RAPHAEL MINDER and DENISE GRADY
The nurse was the first health worker to be infected with the virus outside West Africa, raising concerns about how prepared Western nations are to treat Ebola victims.

Bruised and Weary, Ferguson Struggles to Heal
By JULIE BOSMAN
Almost two months after Michael Brown was shot to death by a police officer, the suburb where he lived remains on edge.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

ADVERTISEMENT






Editors' Picks

U.S.
Scenes of Exultation in Five States as Gay Couples Rush to Marry
By JACK HEALY, MICHAEL D. SHEAR and ERIK ECKHOLM
Preparations moved swiftly for legalized same-sex marriage in six other states where bans were almost certain to be overturned in coming days and weeks.
Highlights of the Same-Sex Marriage Decision



OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
This Little Piggy Went to College
By ANDREA LEVERE
A savings account for every kindergartner.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"She came up to me, crying, and said, 'I think we can get married today.'"
ERIKA TURNER, on her partner, Jennifer Melsop; they became the first same-sex couple to marry in Arlington County, Va., after a Supreme Court decision Monday.


Today's Video

VIDEO: HP Bets That Smaller Is Better
With Hewlett-Packard splitting into two companies, a look at recent examples where the strategy worked out well and where it did not.
Related Article



VIDEO: In Hong Kong, Deflated Hopes for Change
As the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong recede, one young woman reflects on the outcome and how it forced her to confront the inequities she sees every day.
Related Article



VIDEO: ScienceTake | Yippee-i-ay, Lasso Physics
A French scientist plumbs the deep math underlying cowboy rope tricks.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

ADVERTISEMENT


World

43 Missing Students, a Mass Grave and a Suspect: Mexico's Police
By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD
Mass graves have been found in southern Mexico, and some fear they could contain the bodies of 43 students missing since deadly clashes with the police on Sept. 26.

Rebels in Eastern Ukraine Dream of Reviving Soviet Heyday
By ANDREW E. KRAMER
In the relative lull of a cease-fire, separatist leaders have set about building neo-Soviet states like those created in other pro-Russian enclaves.
Pope Francis Calls for Candor at Meeting on Family Issues
By ELISABETTA POVOLEDO
A two-week assembly of bishops is expected to take up issues like divorce and remarrying and could lead to a revision of some church positions.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

2-Tier Secret Service Faces a Test
By MATT APUZZO
The protection service's agents must have more education and experience than its uniformed officers, who were on duty the day a man with a knife ran through the front door of the White House.

Las Vegas Schools Groan From Growing Pains
By ADAM NAGOURNEY
Teachers are scrambling to educate students without the classrooms they need and with no prospect of new ones being built anytime soon, as people move back.

Ebola Screening at Airports Will Increase, Obama Says
By KEVIN SACK
President Obama called the fight against Ebola "a top national security priority," but did not specify how screening procedures would be changed.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

The State of the Non-State, Washington, D.C.
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER
Proponents have sought statehood for the District of Columbia for over half a century, but the political timing never seems to be right.

Amid Tight Races, Bill Clinton Urges Arkansans to Back Democratic Ticket
By JONATHAN MARTIN
The former president lashed out at out-of-state conservative groups that have hammered Senator Mark Pryor, the only Democrat remaining in the state's congressional delegation and perhaps the most endangered incumbent in the country this year.
A Practice Goes on Trial: Force-Feeding a Detainee
By CHARLIE SAVAGE
A lawyer for a Guantánamo Bay detainee called the force-feeding procedures "gratuitous suffering," while the Justice Department said the measures were intended to keep prisoners healthy.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

DEALBOOK
Big Banks Face Another Round of U.S. Charges
By BEN PROTESS and JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG
Around a dozen major banks are being investigated after being accused of colluding to set currency levels, and several are expected to plead guilty.
Interactive: Understanding Libor



DEALBOOK
Breaking Up Is the New Thing to Do
By DAVID GELLES
Activist investors are eager to take small stakes in big companies and call for breakups, betting that profit will follow.

Medicare Revises Nursing Home Rating System
By KATIE THOMAS
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services acknowledged that its five-star rating system needed work, given that it relies heavily on self-reporting.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Meg Whitman Finds a Vision for HP
By QUENTIN HARDY
By splitting Hewlett-Packard into two new entities, Meg Whitman is putting her own, decisive stamp on the iconic company she has led for three years.
Hewlett-Packard Announces Breakup Plan as Technology Landscape Shifts



DEALBOOK
Blockchain Is Latest Bitcoin Start-Up to Lure Big Investment
By SYDNEY EMBER
A $30.5 million fund-raising round by Blockchain, a wallet provider, shows how venture capitalists are betting ever more money on Bitcoin companies.

Microsoft and Other Firms Pledge to Protect Student Data
By NATASHA SINGER
The participating companies are publicly committing themselves not to sell information on kindergartners through 12th graders.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

CARDINALS 3, DODGERS 1
Cardinals Ride John Lackey and Two Home Runs to Win Over Dodgers
By BEN STRAUSS
Lackey, no stranger to the bright lights of October, helped St. Louis take a 2-1 lead in its N.L. division series, with Matt Carpenter and Kolten Wong contributing homers.

SPORTS OF THE TIMES
Funny Thing Happened on the Way to a Quick Demise
By MICHAEL POWELL
The Nationals, who looked to have commenced the walk to the gallows, slipped the noose, emerging a winner over the Giants at AT&T Park.

NATIONALS 4, GIANTS 1
Rare Bunt Adds Life to Nationals' Season
By TYLER KEPNER
Wilson Ramos, who had not executed a sacrifice bunt in more than three years, helped the Nationals beat the Giants and their ace, Madison Bumgarner, who threw away the bunt with disastrous results.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

ARCHITECTURE REVIEW
Building Hope and Nurturing Into Housing
By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN
The new Sugar Hill subsidized housing complex in Upper Manhattan goes beyond even the more ambitious developments by providing a school and a children's museum.

Marian Seldes, Regal Presence of Broadway, Dies at 88
By ROBERT BERKVIST
Ms. Seldes was seldom offstage in a career that spanned more than half a century, and she was especially known for her performances of Edward Albee's work.

BOOKS OF THE TIMES
On Actions Taken, or Not
By MICHIKO KAKUTANI
In "Worthy Fights," Leon E. Panetta, the former defense secretary, makes clear his disagreements with the Obama White House over decisions concerning Syria and Iraq.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

35 New York City Parks to Get Makeovers
By LISA W. FODERARO
Mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to announce plans to spend $130 million on play areas in low-income areas across the city.

After Death of New Jersey Boy From Enterovirus 68, Worry Grows Among Parents
By MARC SANTORA
The virus, which has existed for decades, was never known to have spread widely until this year, and the fact that there's little treatment for it is fueling concerns.

West Coast Weightlifter Arrives at Tappan Zee Site
By JOSEPH BERGER
One of the world's largest floating cranes made its debut Monday morning at the site of the replacement for the aging three-mile Tappan Zee Bridge.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Science

Our Understanding of Giraffes Does Not Measure Up
By NATALIE ANGIER
Giraffes may be popular - a staple of zoos, corporate logos and the plush toy industry - but until recently almost nobody studied giraffes in the field so there is much we don't know about them.

COORDINATES
Wild and Craggy, Just Like Thoreau
By JOHN MARKOFF
A group of writers recently made the trek to the summit of an unnamed mountain for a minor act of civil disobedience: a ceremony to name it for Thoreau.

ON VIEW
Multiculturalism: Nothing New
By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
An exhibit in New York explores Ptolemaic Egypt's embrace of diversity.
For more science news, go to NYTimes.com/Science »

Obituaries

Geoffrey Holder, Multitalented Artist, Dies at 84
By JENNIFER DUNNING and WILLIAM McDONALD
Mr. Holder used his manifold talents to infuse the arts with the flavor of his native West Indies - and in television ads for "the Uncola" in the 1970s and '80s.

Fred Branfman, Laos Activist, Dies at 72
By WILLIAM YARDLEY
During the Vietnam War, Mr. Branfman exposed a secret bombing campaign by the United States and lobbied Congress to stop financing the war.

Marian Seldes, Regal Presence of Broadway, Dies at 88
By ROBERT BERKVIST
Ms. Seldes was seldom offstage in a career that spanned more than half a century, and she was especially known for her performances of Edward Albee's work.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
One Step Closer to Marriage Equality
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The Supreme Court seems to believe that there is no reason to rush to make same-sex marriage the law of the land in all 50 states. But why?
Stopping Ebola in America

After a Dreary Summer, Autumn Chill in France


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Community of Expulsion
By ROGER COHEN
Slaughter in the Middle East cannot be an alibi for Israel to avoid self-scrutiny.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
'Moment of Truth' on Emissions
By JOE NOCERA
President Obama's self-imposed deadline for dealing with fracking's Achilles' heel is here.
Columnist Page


OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
How the Big Tobacco Deal Went Bad
By JIM ESTES
States have misused payments meant for public health.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Oct. 7, 1985, Palestinian gunmen hijacked the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro in the Mediterranean with more than 400 people aboard.
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  • 112 days ago via site
  • 86

ACTUALIZADA 01-10*-2014-1949-2014
#1ESCUADRON(12) TECNOLOGICOYREVOLUCIONARIO “JUAN PABLO DUARTE”
*MAO* = 13): 大師 毛澤東(師 /父) 10º Dan
* BOSS = 13): 大師 毛澤東: “JEFE DE OPERACIONES TECNOLOGIAS Y REVOLUCIONARIAS (ESCUADRON TECNICO-REVOLUCIOANRIO”JUAN PABLO DUARTE MUN2 ).
"CHIEF OPERATIONS AND REVOLUTIONARY TECHNOLOGIES (TECHNICAL SQUADRON-REVOLUCIOANRIO"JUAN PABLO DUARTE MUN2 ).
ARTE MAESTRO MAO Y/O EL MAO DEL ARTISTA Y PROFESOR DOMINICANO JOSE MIURA.- LAPIZ/CARBONCILLO A LINEAS/SUB-CONTORNOS-SOMBRAS/1/2 TONOS- HECHO A MANO MUNDO.
ART MASTER MAO AND/OR THE MAO OF THE ARTIST AND PROFESSOR JOSE MIURA DOMINICAN.- PENCIL/CHARCOAL LINES/SUB-SHADOWS-OUTLINE-/1/2 TONES HAND MADE WORLD.
#REARMANDOLA UTOPIADOMINICANAYDELMUND2<> (MAZARA+AMIN+OTTO+ MAXIMILIANO+HENRY +#(FAFA) +LENNON + MINERVA + PEPEMUJICA+ GUIDO GIL + MANOLO + HOMERO + AMAURY )
#Rearming THE DOMINICAN UTOPIA THE MUND2>
#CUADRODEMANDO1: ORLANDO MAZARA.
#CONTROL PANEL1:ORLANDO MAZARA.
#CONTROL PANEL 2 :ING.AMIN ABEL HASBUN.= LASALLIAN = /X) LA SALLE AND THE PEOPLE OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC HAVE TO WELL PAID "expensive" that LA SALLE HAS BEEN EXPENSIVE HAVE BEEN A TRAINING SCHOOL OF LEADERS UNTIL 1971 WHEN IT WAS DISMANTLED FOR REASONS INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL POLICIES AND BY (2 LITTLE BROTHERS LASALLIAN ): (HIS ENTIRE PHILOSOPHY,ITS TEACHING, ITS PEDAGOGICAL AND UNTIL ITS LEADERSHIP SPORTS) IN THE END ALL YOUR #mystic.
CORRECTED/ CORREGIDA:> DISMANTLED : = DESMANTELADA
#CUADRO DE MANDO 2 : ING.AMIN ABEL HASBUN = LASALLISTA /X) LA SALLE Y EL PUEBLO DOMINICANO HAN A PAGADO BIEN “CARO” QUE LA SALLE HAYA SIDO CARO HABER SIDO UNA ESCUELA DE FORMACION DE LIDERES HASTA EL 1971 CUANDO FUE DESMANTAELADA POPR RAZONES POLITICAS INTERNAS Y EXTERNAS Y POR (2 HERMANITOS LASALLISTA ): (TODA SU FILOSOFIA,SU DIDACTICA, SU PEDAGOGICA Y HASTA SU LIDERAZGO DEPORTIVO) EN DEFINITIVA TODA SU #MISTICA.
CUADRO DE MANDO3: OTTO MORALES.
#CONTROL PANEL3: OTTO MORALES
CUADRO DE MANDO4: MAXIMILIANO GOMEZ ( #EL MORENO ).
#CONTROL PANEL 4 : MAXIMILIANO GOMEZ ( #EL MORENO ).
CUADRO DE MANDO5: HENRY SEGARRA.
#CONTROL PANEL 5 : HENRY SEGARRA.
CUADRO DE MANDO 6: RAFAEL #(FAFA) TAVERAS.
#CONTROL PANEL6: RAFAEL #(FAFA) TAVERAS.
CUADRO DE MANDO 7 : JOHN LENNON.
#CONTROL PANEL 7 : JOHN LENNON
CUADRO DE MANDO 8 :MINERVA MIRABAL .
#CONTROL PANEL 8 : MINERVA MIRABAL.
CUADRO DE MANDO: 9 = JOSE (PEPE ) MUJICA.
Oct 09
AEROSMITH VISITA A MUJICA Y LO CALIFICA DE PODEROSO EJEMPLO
Posted in Farandula
http://www.angelfire.com/film/palmeros0/PoemSBM/JANUARY1983.htm
http://www.touchmailrd.com/index.php/farandula/4598-aerosmith-visita-a-mujica-y-lo-califica-de-poderoso-ejemplo
http://www.touchmailrd.com/images/farandula/aerosmith_1.jpg
#CONTROL PANEL : 9 = = JOSE (PEPE ) MUJICA.
CUADRO DE MANDO:10 = GUIDO GIL.
GUIDO GIL
http://www.diarionoticia.com/noticias/2011/enero/recuerdanaguidogil.htm
#CONTROL PANEL : 10 = GUIDO GIL.
CUADRO DE MANDO:11 = MANOLO TAVAREZ JUSTO.
CONTROL PANEL : 11 = MANOLO TAVAREZ JUSTO.
Manolo Tavárez Justo
DOMINGO, 21 DE DICIEMBRE DE 2008 13:57
http://historiadominicana.com.do/biografias/personajes/193-manolo-tavarez-justo.html
CUADRO DE MANDO:11 = HOMERO HERNANDEZ.
CONTROL PANEL : 11 = HOMERO HERNANDEZ.
http://www.angelfire.com/film/palmeros0/PoemSBM/JANUARY1983.htm
http://www.angelfire.com/ar2/obramaurydigital/index.html
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04
#CONTROL PANEL2
CORRECTED/CORREGIDA: DISMANTLED
Kung Fu Tradicional
Las Artes Marciales Chinas Tradicionales poseen una interesante Historia, polifacéticos Sistemas Técnicos orientados a la lucha cuerpo a cuerpo, abundante información respecto de la Defensa Personal, herramientas para conservar la buena Salud, Códigos de Conducta y muchas otras cosas, que hacen del estudio de las mismas, una verdadera ruta digna de ser transitada. Legadas de generación en generación, hoy día se conservan como un tesoro inestimable.
Traditional Kung Fu The Traditional Chinese Martial Arts have an interesting history, multi-faceted Technical Systems oriented to the melee, a wealth of information with regard to the Defense Staff, tools for maintaining good health, Codes of Conduct and many other things, that make the study of the same, a true route worthy of being busy. Bequeathed from generation to generation, today are preserved as a priceless treasure.
http://kungfutradicional-nos.blogspot.com/2008/08/los-niveles-o-grados-del-kung-fu-wushu.html
Añoranzas dominicanas 1950 1960
-Comprar artículos deportivos en La Casa de los Cuadritos de Toñito Alma, donde Luis Felipe Pina o Luis Felipe Lugo y Miguel J. Terc en la Mella.
-En la Barra Payán: Un derretido de queso RD$0.15, con Jamón RD$0.20 y una leche batida con polvo de canela por arriba RD$0.08.(En el Palacio de los Sándwich al frente eran ligeramente mas caros al igual que en el Colmado Ritz de Don Pepe Menéndez en la Av. Braulio Álvarez con 30 de Marzo-San Martín, pues era con Jamón Serrano)
http://bonoc.wordpress.com/2007/04/17/439/
Productos Cami = Salchichon Cami sponsor del equipo Superior Doble A Beisbol Productos Cami.
Refrescos Tropico de chocolates para los desayunos escolares de la Era.Estaba la planta en la Ave San Martin en3 Tiradentes,Emilio A Morel (Norte)/no me acuerdo (este)-donde esta el mercado.

  • 118 days ago via site
  • 108

N.Y. Today: Cuomo Looks to General Election, but Primary Result Becomes an Issue; Astorino Wants Voters to Know Race Isn't Over-NYT-PALMERA777-5-SUSPENSO-14-09-14-7/8/9/10.
Thursday, September 11, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

The City Remembers

Good morning on this cloudy Thursday.
It is the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.
Here are some ways in which the city is pausing to honor the dead and pay tribute to the first responders:
• A citywide moment of silence: At 8:46 a.m., the minute that the first plane hit, the city will fall silent. Several moments of silence are observed throughout the day.
• A commemorative ceremony: The ceremony at the September 11 Memorial Museum begins at 8:30. Watch the livestream.
• Table of silence for 9/11: One hundred dancers circle the Lincoln Center Plaza's central fountain beginning at 8:15. The performance ends with the moment of silence.
• The Bell of Hope: The parish of Trinity Church rings a bell given to the city by the lord mayor of London after the attacks, in the churchyard of St. Paul's Chapel. 8:45 a.m.
More of the day's news »



News

Cuomo Says He's 'Fine With 60%' in Primary and Looks to General Election
By THOMAS KAPLAN
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York assailed his Republican opponent, Rob Astorino, while Mr. Astorino said the governor's showing in the Democratic contest was a "major embarrassment."

Astorino, Cuomo's Opponent, Wants Voters to Know the Race Isn't Over
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Rob Astorino, the Westchester County executive, is a social conservative with little state name recognition and a small campaign budget. Still, he is enthusiastic about his chances of upsetting Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo in November's election.

Mayor Agrees to Accommodate 4 Larger or New Charter Schools
By KATE TAYLOR
Under a new state law, New York City must offer free space in public buildings or or help with the cost of renting private space.

Prosecutors Are Pushing Prison Time for D'Souza
By BENJAMIN WEISER
The conservative author and filmmaker Dinesh D'Souza could face 10 to 16 months in prison for illegally making $20,000 in donations to Wendy E. Long's 2012 Senate campaign.

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Features

BUILDING BLOCKS
A 9/11 Shrine Where Families Mourned, Now Open to Others
By DAVID W. DUNLAP
Painful, poignant and mostly secret, the chamber, until recently at ground zero, served as a private sanctuary and was transformed by mementos into a shrine.

The Making of Carolina Herrera's Fashion Show
By JOHN KOBLIN
A fashion show like the one Carolina Herrera presented this week may be the most elaborately produced 12 minutes in show business.
Video: Pursuing Elegance



Sports

Dee Milliner Returns to Jets in Time for Encounter With Aaron Rodgers
By BEN SHPIGEL
After facing Oakland and a rookie quarterback in Week 1, the Jets have no such luxury Sunday against Green Bay and Aaron Rodgers.

ROUNDUP
Ex-Mets Executive Sues Jeff Wilpon, Citing Discrimination Over Pregnancy
By RICHARD SANDOMIR
Leigh Castergine, a former ticket-sales executive for the Mets, filed suit in federal court, accusing the team and its chief operating officer of discriminating against her for being pregnant without being married.

KEEPING SCORE
Yanks and Mets on Equal Footing in Long-Shot Chase for Playoffs
By JAY SCHREIBER
A look at the wild-card standings challenges the perception that the Yankees, even when they're down, manage to play important games in September while the Mets do not.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

MULTIMEDIA FEATURE: A View of Ground Zero
Photographs by BEDEL SAGET
A panoramic view of the progress at the new World Trade Center site exactly 13 years after the Sept. 11 attacks.

Arts

DANCE REVIEW
Down a Rabbit Hole, Where Everything Makes Complete Sense
By BRIAN SEIBERT
Christopher Wheeldon's ballet "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" adds a prologue, a deanery, a rajah and a romance.

THEATER REVIEW | 'BOOTYCANDY'
This Love Dares to Speak Its Name, Explicitly
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
"Bootycandy," Robert O'Hara's searing and sensationally funny comedy, looks at attitudes toward gays in black culture.

MUSIC REVIEW
Banging Out an Armistice on Keyboards
By ANTHONY TOMMASINI
Two pioneers of Minimalism, the composers Philip Glass and Steve Reich, put aside a feud and performed together for the first time in over 40 years at the Next Wave Festival in Brooklyn.
Interactive Feature: The Times 100


For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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N.Y. Today: On 9/11 Anniversary, Looking Back and Ahead; De Blasio Pushes for Democrats to Take State Senate
Friday, September 12, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Last Chances for Art

Good morning on this practically chilly Friday.
Marvelous things are on display in the city, but their days are numbered.
Before these exhibitions close this month, you may want to see:
• A 16th-century prayer book the size of a MetroCard commissioned by the queen of France, at the Morgan Museum.
• Big word-based paintings by Mel Bochner based on his fascination with Roget's Thesaurus, at the Jewish Museum.
• A pendant containing Tom Thumb's tiny foldout wedding album, at the Museum of Arts and Design.
• The "world's biggest and most elaborate display of Lego art" at Discovery Times Square.
More of the day's news »



News

On 9/11 Anniversary, Looking Back and Ahead
By TATIANA SCHLOSSBERG and MARC SANTORA
This year, as families of the victims gathered in Manhattan, at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania, there was talk of new military campaigns in the Middle East.
New York Today: The City Remembers



POLITICAL MEMO
De Blasio's Goal to Aid His Agenda: Put New York Senate in Democrats' Hands
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM and THOMAS KAPLAN
Two factors may improve Democrats' chances: Former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's prodigious spending for Republicans will be out, and Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo says he will be in.

Doctor Present at Joan Rivers's Procedure Wasn't Authorized at Clinic
By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS
An ear, nose and throat specialist was said to have been in the operating room last month when the comedian went into cardiac arrest.

Budget Cuts Reshape New York's Public Housing
By MIREYA NAVARRO
Thousands of city renters who rely on public subsidies are being forced to pay more for housing or move into smaller spaces.

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Features

Data for a New York 'Smellmap,' Collected Sniff by Sniff
By VIVIAN YEE
The artist and designer Kate McLean led an investigative tour of sidewalk odors in Brooklyn, documenting the city's aromas.

Columnist

ABOUT NEW YORK
Amid Tie Tacks, a Ring Worn by an Ancestor Who Was President
By JIM DWYER
Theodore Roosevelt V was watching a film about his famous relatives when he saw the ring on his great-great-grandfather's pinkie.
More About New York Columns



Sports

YANKEES 5, RAYS 4
Yankees' Hits Are Few, but Ex-Met Has a Big One
By SETH BERKMAN
A three-run homer by Chris Young in the ninth helped the Yankees secure a win over the Rays in a game in which they were held hitless for seven and a third innings.

NATIONALS 6, METS 2
Nationals Help Turn Mets' Thoughts to Next Year
By TIM ROHAN
Washington scored all six of its runs off starter Bartolo Colon to take a big early lead and prevented the Mets from capitalizing on base-loaded situations in the seventh and eighth innings.

Under Pressure From Fans, Giants Count on Eli Manning to Find His Feet
By BILL PENNINGTON
The new offensive coordinator, Ben McAdoo, said Eli Manning and the rest of the team had made strides in the West Coast offense ahead of Sunday's game against the Cardinals.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

On New York City Beaches, Endless Summer
By COREY KILGANNON
For some, Labor Day marks the beginning of the choicest time on the city's beaches, despite the city's official policy of closing all the beaches to swimming after the holiday.

Arts

ART REVIEW
Capturing Apartheid's Daily Indignity
By HOLLAND COTTER
Ernest Cole's photographs capture what it was like to be black in apartheid South Africa.

ART REVIEW
Fantasies From Pandora's Shoe Box
By ROBERTA SMITH
"Killer Heels," a sweeping exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, drives home the notion that shoes are one of visual culture's most freighted artifacts.
WEEKEND MISER
Two Sides Sounding at BEAT Festival in Brooklyn
By A. C. LEE
The modestly scaled and impeccably organized BEAT Festival, held across Brooklyn throughout the middle of September, offers mostly affordable or free events.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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Today's Headlines: Nations Trying to Stop Their Citizens From Going to Middle East to Fight for ISIS
Today's Headlines Saturday, September 13, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Travel | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Nations Trying to Stop Their Citizens From Going to Middle East to Fight for ISIS
By SOMINI SENGUPTA
Lawmakers around the world are debating laws intended to stop citizens from going abroad to fight, and to punish them if they do.

U.S. Scientists See Long Fight Against Ebola
By DENISE GRADY
The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is likely to last 12 to 18 months more and could infect hundreds of thousands, say scientists mapping its spread for the American government.

Brain Trauma to Affect One in Three Players, N.F.L. Agrees
By KEN BELSON
The statements are the league's most unvarnished admission yet that the sport's professional participants sustain severe brain injuries at far higher rates than the general population.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

WORLD
Ian Paisley Dies at 88; Longtime Voice of Hard-Line Ulster Who Then Made Peace
By ROBERT D. McFADDEN
The Protestant leader who vowed never to compromise with Irish Catholic nationalists accepted in his twilight a power-sharing agreement after decades of sectarian violence.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"We hope we're wrong."
BRYAN LEWIS, an epidemiologist at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech, who worked on calculations to project the extent of the Ebola crisis.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Stopping Home-Bound ISIS Fighters
A look at how governments around the world deal with their citizens who become jihadists.
Related Article



VIDEO: Stacked With Warrants
In Ferguson, Mo., a neighbor of Michael Brown's family tries to clear various warrants for his arrest so he can participate in civil disobedience.
Related Article



VIDEO: Sweet and Spicy Roast Chicken
Melissa Clark roasts juicy chicken thighs with carrots, onions and dates for a twist on a classic dish for the Jewish holidays.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Liberian President Pleads With Obama for Assistance in Combating Ebola
By HELENE COOPER
Liberia's president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, warned that without American assistance, the Ebola epidemic could send the country into the civil chaos that enveloped it for two decades.

Embrace of Social Media Aids Flood Victims in Kashmir
By NIDA NAJAR and ELLEN BARRY
Social media companies, government agencies and still-connected individuals have cooperated to help locate some 12,000 people amid the flooding and communications difficulties.
U.S. and European Sanctions Take Aim at Putin's Economic Efforts
By PETER BAKER and ANDREW HIGGINS
The measures take aim at financial, defense and industrial companies at the vanguard of a push by the Russian leader to replace wild free-market capitalism with state-led development.
U.S. and Europe Back New Economic Sanctions Against Russia


For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

A Rebound Takes Root in Michigan, but Voters' Gloom Is Hard to Shake
By JONATHAN WEISMAN
No state has seen stronger gains in employment since the recession, but the recovery has proved to be something of an abstraction to voters.

Mistrust Lingers as Ferguson Takes New Tack on Fines
By FRANCES ROBLES
The trust level was not high in court and at the police clerk's window in Ferguson, Mo., this week as municipal penalties were scaled back in an effort to repair the city's frayed relationship with the black community.
Federal Appeals Court Permits Wisconsin Voter ID Law
By MONICA DAVEY
The order was a blow to opponents of such requirements, who had been heartened by a lower court's finding that the law had abridged citizens' right to vote.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Iran's Participation in Meeting to Aid Iraq Is 'Not Appropriate,' Says Kerry
By MICHAEL R. GORDON
The French hosts of a meeting to coordinate assistance to the Iraqi fight against Islamist militants have not ruled out Iran's attendance, but the United States is arguing against the country's inclusion.

Clinton Silent on 2016 Bid as Campaign-Style Actions Begin to Speak Volumes
By AMY CHOZICK
Hillary Rodham Clinton has said that she will decide early next year whether she will undertake a campaign for the presidency. But inside the Clinton operation, the groundwork is already quietly being laid for a candidacy.

Mark Sanford Announces a Breakup on Facebook
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
Representative Mark Sanford of South Carolina turned to Facebook on Friday to announce he had ended his engagement to the Argentine woman he once called his soul mate.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

DEALBOOK
Puerto Rico Finds It Has New Friends in Hedge Funds
By MICHAEL CORKERY
Hedge fund firms and investors have bought about 10 percent of all Puerto Rico government bonds, and have offered to help the government in expectation of a big return on their investment.

New Sanctions to Stall Exxon's Arctic Oil Plans
By STANLEY REED and CLIFFORD KRAUSS
The United States government took aim at Exxon's project in the Arctic Ocean, ordering American companies to cut off exports to Russian oil exploration within 14 days.

After Breach, JPMorgan Still Seeks to Determine Extent of Attack
By NICOLE PERLROTH and MATTHEW GOLDSTEIN
Over two months, hackers gained entry to dozens of the bank's servers, said three people with knowledge of the bank's investigation into the episode.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Government Push for Yahoo's User Data Set Stage for Broad Surveillance
By VINDU GOEL
Documents from the case paint a vivid portrait of the high-stakes battle that pitted Yahoo against some top officials in the Bush administration over what was legitimate gathering of foreign intelligence and what was illegal snooping.
BITS BLOG
Square to Raise $100 Million at a $6 Billion Valuation
By MIKE ISAAC
The funding comes after a difficult year for Square, a five-year-old company that has appeared to shift its strategy.

BITS BLOG
A Conversation With Peter Thiel
By QUENTIN HARDY
The PayPal co-founder turned venture capitalist has a new book coming it. And with it, one of Silicon Valley's most outspoken leaders explains why he so often tries to get people to see the world through a different lens.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

A Trial Concludes, but for South Africans, the Debate May Be Just Starting
By SARAH LYALL and ALAN COWELL
Oscar Pistorius was found guilty of a charge equivalent to manslaughter in the shooting of Reeva Steenkamp, but he was granted bail and will remain free until sentencing procedures on Oct. 13.

N.F.L. Rocked Again as Adrian Peterson Faces a Child Abuse Charge
By STEVE EDER and PAT BORZI
Peterson, a star running back for the Minnesota Vikings, has been charged in a child abuse inquiry in Montgomery County, Tex., involving his son.
Ray Rice Case Highlights a Crime Often Obscured
By DAVID KOCIENIEWSKI
Violent domestic assaults rarely lead to jail time or serious legal consequences, but a renewed focus on the issue could bring stricter rules.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Playing Piano, and Blaming Woody Allen
By DAVE ITZKOFF
Jeff Goldblum, leader of the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, opening at the Café Carlyle on Tuesday, says he could have seen himself as a full-time musician rather than an actor.

Carnegie Hall Makes Room for Future Stars
By MICHAEL COOPER
Carnegie Hall is ready to unveil its new education wing and roof terrace, with the completion of its $230 million renovation.
Europeans Bracing for Netflix
By DOREEN CARVAJAL
As Netflix prepares to start streaming in six European countries next week, some politicians and rival businesses there are assailing the company over issues like competition and taxes.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

Dungeons, Dragons & Documentaries: A Film Conjures a Battle
By VIVIAN YEE
Three filmmakers set out to tell the origin story of the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons. Two years later, there is no documentary, only broken friendships and a lawsuit.
Doctor Who Worked on Joan Rivers Steps Down From Post at Medical Clinic
By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS
Dr. Lawrence B. Cohen, who performed an endoscopy on Joan Rivers before she went into cardiac arrest, is not acting as the medical director or doing procedures at Yorkville Endoscopy.
Inmate's Death in Overheated Rikers Cell Is Ruled Accidental
By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ
The ruling by the New York City medical examiner in the case of a mentally ill veteran who died in an overheated cell at Rikers Island raises questions of culpability in the case.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Travel

Three Sides of Ecuador
By MICHELLE HIGGINS
On a journey through the diverse South American country, taking in the coast, the mountains and a town with colonial charm.

CULTURED TRAVELER
Argentina Rediscovers Its African Roots
By MICHAEL T. LUONGO
From tango to tunnels, a nation begins to trace the once-robust culture of the slaves who were brought there.

HEADS UP
In Buenos Aires, a 'Secret' World of Dining
By DANIELLE PERGAMENT
At "closed door" restaurants in the Argentine capital, the address is just part of the intrigue.
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »

Obituaries

Donald Sinden, British Actor of Stage and Screen for 60 Years, Dies at 90
By PETER KEEPNEWS
Mr. Sinden appeared in "Mogambo," was nominated for a Tony for his role in Alan Bennett's "Habeas Corpus," and starred in long-running British television comedies.

Riva Castleman, Curator Who Promoted Printmaking, Dies at 84
By BRUCE WEBER
As an art historian and curator with the Museum of Modern Art, Ms. Castleman organized exhibitions placing contemporary prints in a larger context.

Bob Crewe, Songwriter for Frankie Valli and Four Seasons, Dies at 83
By WILLIAM YARDLEY
Mr. Crewe, who wrote for other music acts as well, was perhaps best known for "Can't Take My Eyes Off You," a No. 1 hit for Mr. Valli.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
The Sluggish Fight Against Ebola
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
American and other efforts are not moving fast enough to keep up with the increasing infection and death rates.
Mr. Bratton Reverses to Go Forward

A Showdown on the Pay Gap


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Don't Throw the Bums Out
By JON GRINSPAN
How grumbling about politicians in fact makes Washington worse.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Candidates Playing Possum
By GAIL COLLINS
Control of the Senate hinges on the outcome of just a few close races. Which candidates will show up and debate their opponents?
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
N.F.L. Stands By Its Leader
By JOE NOCERA
Roger Goodell is very good at doing exactly what his owners want.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Sept. 13, 1993, at the White House, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO chairman Yasser Arafat shook hands after signing an accord granting limited Palestinian autonomy.
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N.Y. Today: A Dungeons and Dragons Film Conjures a Battle; Doctor Who Worked on Rivers Relinquishes Post at Medical Clinic
Saturday, September 13, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

News

Dungeons, Dragons & Documentaries: A Film Conjures a Battle
By VIVIAN YEE
Three filmmakers set out to tell the origin story of the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons. Two years later, there is no documentary, only broken friendships and a lawsuit.
Doctor Who Worked on Joan Rivers Steps Down From Post at Medical Clinic
By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS
Dr. Lawrence B. Cohen, who performed an endoscopy on Joan Rivers before she went into cardiac arrest, is not acting as the medical director or doing procedures at Yorkville Endoscopy.

Rainbow Sheens and a Tip Draw a Focus to Dumping in Newtown Creek
By PATRICK McGEEHAN
Neighbors noticed oil slicks on the surface of the murky waterway between Brooklyn and Queens this summer, and authorities have identified a potential culprit.
Inmate's Death in Overheated Rikers Cell Is Ruled Accidental
By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ
The ruling by the New York City medical examiner in the case of a mentally ill veteran who died in an overheated cell at Rikers Island raises questions of culpability in the case.

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Features

This Art Is Indeed Long (66 Feet). And Very Heavy (About 12 Tons).
By JAMES BARRON
"Points of View," three large bronze towers by the artist Tony Cragg, all 66 feet and 12 tons of it, was installed in Madison Square Park in Manhattan on Friday.

Columnist

CRIME SCENE
When Fighting Fires Becomes Something Else
By MICHAEL WILSON
When answering calls, firefighters don't expect to find murder victims, but sometimes they do, as in a recent Queens murder-suicide.
More Crime Scene Columns



Sports

ORIOLES 2, YANKEES 1 (11 INNINGS); ORIOLES 5, YANKEES 0
Orioles Lose Chris Davis to Drug Suspension Before Edging Yankees
By DAVID WALDSTEIN
Davis, Baltimore's slugging corner infielder, was barred for 25 games after he tested positive for amphetamines.

CHARACTER STUDY
The Scorekeeper
By COREY KILGANNON
Howie Karpin, 60, an official scorer for both the Mets and the Yankees, is now in his 16th full season of recording the game action.

A New Track and a New Tack
By SCOTT CACCIOLA
James L. Dolan says he is spending less time on the Knicks and more time with his blues band, perhaps a sign that he really will give Phil Jackson a wide berth to run the team.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

WHAT I LOVE
Conversation Pieces (Not That He Needs Them)
By JOANNE KAUFMAN
Mo Rocca, a CBS correspondent, lives with a collection of presidential memorabilia.
More 'What I Love' Columns



Arts

Carnegie Hall Makes Room for Future Stars
By MICHAEL COOPER
Carnegie Hall is ready to unveil its new education wing and roof terrace, with the completion of its $230 million renovation.

Playing Piano, and Blaming Woody Allen
By DAVE ITZKOFF
Jeff Goldblum, leader of the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, opening at the Café Carlyle on Tuesday, says he could have seen himself as a full-time musician rather than an actor.

THEATER REVIEW | 'DRY LAND'
Swimming in High School, Drowning in Life
By BEN BRANTLEY
In "Dry Land," two girls on a high school swim team form a complicated friendship as one of them faces the terrible fact of a pregnancy.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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Ukraine Deal Imposes Truce Putin Devised --NYT-PALMERA777-4-07-09-14-10-11-12
Today's Headlines Sunday, September 7, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Magazine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

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Top News

Obama Delays Immigration Action, Yielding to Democratic Concerns
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR
In putting off action until after the November elections, President Obama was acting out of concern for Senate Democrats on the ballots, White House officials said on Saturday.
In Remote Detention Center, a Battle on Fast Deportations



Foreign Powers Buy Influence at Think Tanks
By ERIC LIPTON, BROOKE WILLIAMS and NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Prominent Washington think tanks, nonprofits known for their impartiality, have received tens of millions of dollars from foreign governments while pushing United States government officials to adopt policies that often reflect the donors' priorities, an investigation by The New York Times has found.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
Refugees Reshape Their Camp, at the Risk of Feeling at Home
By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN
The construction of a public square in a deeply conservative Palestinian refugee camp has made some there feel more at home, a provocative concept in camps conceived as temporary.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

ARTS
INTERACTIVE FEATURE: Fall Arts Preview - Times 100
How to wade through the crush of culture coming your way this season? Here's a guide to 100 events that have us especially excited, in order of appearance.

| THE UPSHOT
Why Democrats Can't Win the House
By NATE COHN
Thanks to demographics, the Republicans have a virtual stranglehold on the House of Representatives.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"We need to open our eyes. This is not going to stop."
AHMED HIRSI, a banker who has led youth groups in the Minneapolis area, referring to young men and women in the Somali community there who are turning to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Players in the Coalition Against ISIS
The Obama administration is now leading a coalition of nations to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.
Related Article



VIDEO: In the Studio | Diane von Furstenberg
Diane von Furstenberg chats with Vanessa Friedman about how her fashionably eclectic office in the Meatpacking District doubles as a living space and a reflection of the DVF brand.

VIDEO: Driven | 2014 Volkswagen Tiguan SEL
An aging German maintains its moves, but stumbles over the numbers.
Related Review


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Cease-Fire in Ukraine Holds, but Soldiers and Residents Doubt It Will Last
By CARLOTTA GALL and NEIL MacFARQUHAR
The cease-fire between the Ukrainian government and Russian-backed separatists held on Saturday, but some violations were reported, and soldiers and civilians doubted that calm would prevail.

Syrian Bombs Hit ISIS-Held Territory
By ANNE BARNARD
At least 25 people, mostly civilians, were killed in the northeastern province of Raqqa as government forces attacked territory controlled by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

To Draw in New Crowds, an Industry Bets on Itself
By MARTIN FACKLER
With new halls that are bigger, cleaner, more luxurious and friendlier, the pachinko industry is trying to reinvent itself by appealing to new customers and by cleaning up its image.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

For Jihad Recruits, a Pipeline From Minnesota to Militancy
By JACK HEALY
The intertwined journeys of two friends toward militancy offer a sharp example of how the allure of Islamist extremism has evolved, enticing similar pools of young Americans to conflicts in different parts of the world.
Redactions in U.S. Memo Leave Doubts on Data Surveillance Program
By CHARLIE SAVAGE
Questions persist after the release of a newly declassified version of a legal memo approving the National Security Agency's Stellarwind program, a set of warrantless surveillance and data collection activities secretly authorized after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Lessons From Losses Drive Massachusetts Candidates
By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
Martha Coakley, a Democrat, and Charlie Baker, a Republican, were stung in 2010, but both are favored to win in the primary for governor on Tuesday.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Challenging the President ... but Only on the Golf Course
By JASON HOROWITZ
Marvin Nicholson, the White House travel director, who has played golf with the president about 140 times, rounds out the president's foursomes and soothes his frayed feelings.

WHITE HOUSE MEMO
As Crises Pile Up, a President Sticks to His Deliberative Approach
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
President Obama's determination to move deliberately and line up support from allies before confronting threats means that he has sometimes appeared to be a spectator to events outside his control.

Light Pre-Election Schedule in Congress Matches Legislative Goals
By JONATHAN WEISMAN
Passing a stopgap spending bill and keeping the Export-Import Bank open are among the modest objectives that lawmakers have set this month.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Just 13, and Working Risky 12-Hour Shifts in the Tobacco Fields
By STEVEN GREENHOUSE
Public health experts say hundreds of children under 16 continue to work in America's tobacco fields, where they are exposed to harmful chemicals like nicotine.

THE UPSHOT
The Motherhood Penalty vs. the Fatherhood Bonus
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
A study finds that having a child helps your career, if you are a man. For women, it does the opposite.

Greek Leader Promises Cuts in Oil and Income Taxes
By NIKI KITSANTONIS
Prime Minister Antonis Samaras announced a 30 percent cut to a heating oil levy and a reduction to a so-called solidarity tax on income.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

The Jack Ma Way
By DAVID BARBOZA
Alibaba, started by Jack Ma in 1999, is about to sell shares in the United States that could value the company at about $160 billion.
Graphic: Circle of Friends



TECHNOPHORIA
OkCupid's Unblushing Analyst of Attraction
By NATASHA SINGER
Christian Rudder, president of the online dating service OkCupid, says websites like his should conduct more research, not less, on users' habits.

BITS BLOG
How Big Companies and Their Tech Suppliers Are Changing Together
By QUENTIN HARDY
Moves this week by companies like Google and Box illustrate how much the cloud and mobility are reshaping the workplace, as well as the tech companies themselves.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

U.S. Open 2014: Roger Federer Is Ousted by Marin Cilic in Semifinal
By HARVEY ARATON
Marin Cilic, seeded 14th, beat second-seeded Roger Federer in straight sets and will face Kei Nishikori, who upset top-seeded Novak Djokovic, in Monday's final.

A First for a Player, Who's One Win Away
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Kei Nishikori became the first man from Asia to reach a Grand Slam singles final by defeating top-seeded Novak Djokovic, 6-4, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3.

In the Wee Hours, Japan Erupts in Celebration
By HIROKO TABUCHI
In Japan, tennis fans rejoiced as Kei Nishikori became the first man from Japan, and Asia, to reach a Grand Slam final.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Anti-Pop Star (Except for Those Hooks)
By JON CARAMANICA
Charli XCX, a Myspace prodigy, is developing into a more mature performer.

Immersive Sound Fills a Factory
By BEN RATLIFF
The Basilica Soundscape festival offers two days of aggressive and immersive music.

Diversity in Action, as Well as in Words
By BILL CARTER
New ABC shows feature an Asian family comedy, a black actress as the star of a new drama, and a black family comedy.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

On Eve of the Democratic Primary, Cuomo Briefly Hits the Campaign Trail
By THOMAS KAPLAN
Three days before the state's Democratic primary, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York made two appearances, in Manhattan and Queens, his first political outing of the campaign season.

The Rise and Fall of the Biggest Pot Dealer in New York City History
By ALAN FEUER
An elaborate case led to the discovery, and subsequent arrest, of Jimmy Cournoyer, a French Canadian playboy and international criminal.

Some Chinese Tourists Visit New York but Sleep in New Jersey
By JAMES BARRON
With the number of Chinese tourists to New York soaring, New Jersey has become an unlikely base camp for many of them.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Magazine

So Bill Gates Has This Idea for a History Class ...
By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
Should one of the world's richest men get to dictate the future of how we learn about our past?

Why Flunking Exams Is Actually a Good Thing
By BENEDICT CAREY
To learn how to study, start by bombing a pretest.

The Battle for New York Schools: Eva Moskowitz vs. Mayor Bill de Blasio
By DANIEL BERGNER
The fight between two liberal crusaders with profoundly divergent ideas about how to aid and educate the disempowered.
For more from the Sunday magazine, go to NYTimes.com/Magazine »

Obituaries

Lillian Gobitas Klose, 90, Dies; Stood Against Mandatory Pledge
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
In 1935 Ms. Klose heeded a Jehovah's Witnesses leader's call to refuse to recite the pledge in compliance with biblical commands against idolatry.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Justice in St. Louis County
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The Justice Department's civil rights investigation into policing in the town where Michael Brown was killed should extend to neighboring towns.
From Bad to Worse With Ebola

Limbo and Cruelty at Guantánamo


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Demanding More From College
By FRANK BRUNI
In a world of many separate camps, college can and should be a bridge.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Is It WWIII or Just Twitter?
By MAUREEN DOWD
President Obama blames social media for our knowing just how messy the world is.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Sunday Review

NEWS ANALYSIS
Why Don't More Men Go Into Teaching?
By MOTOKO RICH
A change in the gender imbalance could sway the way teaching is regarded, and help it attract the best candidates.

ON THIS DAY
On Sept. 7, 1940, the German air force began its blitz on London during World War II.
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Today's Headlines: Obama Enlists 9 Allies to Help in the Battle Against ISIS
Today's Headlines Saturday, September 6, 2014


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Top News

Obama Enlists 9 Allies to Help in the Battle Against ISIS
By HELENE COOPER
President Obama escalated the U.S. response to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria on Friday, recruiting at least nine allies to help crush the organization and offering the outlines of a strategy that echoes the war on terror.

Ukraine Deal Imposes Truce Putin Devised
By NEIL MacFARQUHAR
Whether the cease-fire between Ukraine's government and separatists lasts will probably be determined by the outcome of negotiations over the political future of the southeastern region.
On Ukraine, West Sidesteps a Fraught Term: 'Invasion'



Ebola Is Taking a Second Toll, on Economies
By ADAM NOSSITER
The disease, and the hysteria it has caused, is already having a serious economic impact, in part because some countries are closing down borders.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S.
Wary 'Normal' in Ferguson, Mo.
By TODD HEISLER
After the killing of a black teenager by a white police officer sparked a string of protests in Ferguson, Mo., the town is returning to a new normal as scars of the unrest remain.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Atlantic City's Next Gamble
By NELSON JOHNSON
Lessons from the boss of the original boardwalk empire.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"If I go back to Honduras, it is certain death."
HEIDY LARA CARBALLO, a young Honduran woman told an immigration judge in her successful bid to remain in the United States.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Players in the Coalition Against ISIS
The Obama administration is now leading a coalition of nations to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

VIDEO: This Week's Movies | Sept. 5, 2014
The New York Times film critics review "The Congress," "Kelly & Cal" and "Last Days In Vietnam."

VIDEO: What Is Alibaba?
Alibaba, China's largest e-commerce company, is preparing to go public in New York, setting up expectations for the biggest stock market debut in United States history.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

NATO Plans a Special Force to Reassure Eastern Europe and Deter Russia
By STEVEN ERLANGER, JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and STEPHEN CASTLE
The decision to form the force was meant to send a message to Russia that NATO's principle of collective security is sacrosanct.
Strikes Killed Militant Chief in Somalia, U.S. Reports
By HELENE COOPER, ERIC SCHMITT and JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
The Pentagon said it had confirmed that airstrikes Monday killed the leader of the Shabab, the Somalia militant network affiliated with Al Qaeda.
Jet Carrying Contractors Is Ordered to Land in Iran
By PETER BAKER and ERIC SCHMITT
The United States attributed the episode to a bureaucratic issue and not a larger political incident. The plane was later allowed to depart Iran, and by Friday night, had landed in Dubai, officials said.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

In Remote Detention Center, a Battle on Fast Deportations
By JULIA PRESTON
A corps of volunteers is changing the nature and purpose of a temporary outpost that the Obama administration set up to hold illegal immigrants briefly until they could be deported.

Louisiana Judge Rejects Suit Over Landrieu's Residency
By JEREMY ALFORD
A state district judge on Friday threw out a lawsuit claiming that Senator Mary L. Landrieu lives full time in Washington and cannot represent Louisiana, saying it was premature.

ON RELIGION
As Iraqi Christians in U.S. Watch ISIS Advance, They See 'Slow-Motion Genocide'
By SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN
Worshipers at the Mother of God Chaldean Catholic Church in Southfield, Mich., have been trying desperately to raise awareness about persecution in their home country.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Virginians, Surprised by Ex-Governor's Conviction, Ponder the Fallout
By TRIP GABRIEL
Politicians consider new ethics rules in a state with notoriously lax ones and the possible consequences if state legislators do not substantially limit gifts public officials can receive.

Christie's Trip Looks Like a Campaign for President
By MICHAEL BARBARO
The tour of Mexico by Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey has some of the trappings of a presidential campaign, with local traffic stopping for his motorcade, with aides enforcing protocol and with efforts to put the governor in the best possible light.
Video: Christie Addresses Trade in Mexico



Candidate Not on Providence Primary Ballot Stirs Mayoral Field
By JESS BIDGOOD
With signature bombast and zeal, Vincent A. Cianci Jr. has exerted outsize influence as candidates scrambled to avoid indirectly helping him by splitting the vote.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

DEALBOOK
As Its Initial Offering Nears, Alibaba Gets Ready for a Splashy Debut
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
The company, which runs two huge online marketplaces in China, plans to kick off a long-awaited roadshow for potential investors on Monday.



Job Growth Is Sluggish, Raising Fear of Malaise
By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ
With only 142,000 jobs added, August was the first month since January in which the economy failed to add at least 200,000 jobs. Unemployment fell slightly to 6.1 percent.
The Upshot: Not Good, Not Terrible Either



Silicon Valley Fights Order to Pay Bigger Settlement in Hiring Case
By DAVID STREITFELD
Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe filed papers asking the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to spurn Judge Lucy H. Koh's rejection of their $324.5 million antitrust settlement as too meager.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Two Cities With Blazing Internet Speed Search for a Killer App
By CONOR DOUGHERTY
Both Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan., have Google Fiber, a high-speed fiber-optic network, and are having a hard time figuring out what to do with so much power.

BITS | STATE OF THE ART
Taking a Naked Selfie? Your Phone Should Step In to Protect You
By FARHAD MANJOO
Our phones don't do nearly enough to protect our most sensitive documents: indelicate photos of ourselves.

So Bill Gates Has This Idea for a History Class ...
By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
Should one of the world's richest men get to dictate the future of how we learn about our past?
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

A Scare and a Disheartening Victory
By LYNN ZINSER
Wozniacki beat Peng in a semifinal match when Peng retired because of a heat-related illness with the score, 7-6 (1), 4-3. Wozniacki will face Serena Williams in the final.

ON TENNIS
Focused Ferocity by Serena Williams on a Stage She Owns at the U.S. Open
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Having won her semifinal against Ekaterina Makarova in one hour at Arthur Ashe Stadium, Williams is poised to win her third U.S. Open title in a row.

The Man Who Spins Pinstripes Into Gold
By RICHARD SANDOMIR
Brandon Steiner has been a force in the sports memorabilia business since the early 1990s, and he is a key figure in the selling of Derek Jeter's final season with the Yankees.
Slide Show: The King of Collectibles


For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

The Heir's Not Apparent
By RANDY KENNEDY
A legal battle over the work of the photographer Vivian Maier could hide it away for years.

Vienna State Opera's Music Director Resigns
By MICHAEL COOPER and REBECCA SCHMID
The general music director, Franz Welser-Möst, cited "irreconcilable differences" for his decision and withdrew from all his scheduled performances there.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
Rarity Returns: Jazz Club for Duos
By NATE CHINEN
Mezzrow, a cozy jazz piano room in Greenwich Village, is the latest effort to fill a void left when Bradley's closed in 1996.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

Settlement Is Approved in Central Park Jogger Case, but New York Deflects Blame
By BENJAMIN WEISER
The five men who were convicted will share $41 million, or about $1 million for each year spent in prison.
Cuomo Assuming Campaign Mode Just Days Before Votes Are Cast
By THOMAS KAPLAN and DAVID W. CHEN
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, who is expected to win the Democratic primary on Tuesday, will make his first election-season outing this weekend.

New York Will Require More Builders to Add Affordable Units
By MATT A.V. CHABAN and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Mayor Bill de Blasio's planning chief, Carl Weisbrod, disclosed a new policy to spur construction of housing for low- or middle-income residents.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Travel

To Ride Again Another Day in Colorado
By ELI GOTTLIEB
Months after heavy rains flooded Boulder, a former resident returns to assess the area's cycling culture.

EXPLORER
Mud, Worms and Ropes: A One-Day Survival Course
By LINDSAY CROUSE
A class from the Bear Grylls Survival Academy teaches participants tricks for negotiating the wild.

FRUGAL TRAVELER
8 Portland, Ore., Meals for $8 or Under
By SETH KUGEL
From a sandwich that's "just automatically delicious" to an item that "boggles the mind," here's a menu for frugal eats in the Northwest city.
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »

Obituaries

Andrew Kay, Pioneer in Computing, Dies at 95
By JOHN MARKOFF
Mr. Kay's company Kaypro produced the Kaypro II computer, a hit in the 1980s, but fell into bankruptcy after being left behind by an industry coalescing around the MS-DOS operating system.

Charlie Powell, a Standout Regardless of the Sport, Dies at 82
By BRUCE WEBER
Described by a San Diego newspaper as "arguably the greatest athlete ever to come out of San Diego County," Powell excelled at pro football, baseball and boxing.

Marjorie Strider, Sly Pop Artist, Is Dead at 83
By RANDY KENNEDY
Ms. Strider, best-known, perhaps, for her pinup paintings, described them as "a satire of men's magazines."
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
A Cease-Fire in Ukraine
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
It would be a mistake to assume that the agreement guarantees a quick or easy path to stability for the country.
Jobs Stall and So Does the Economy

The 'Secure Communities' Illusion


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Passion for the Pill
By GAIL COLLINS
In Congressional races across the country, women's issues are looming large. Just listen to some of the Republican candidates.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Price of Glory
By JOE NOCERA
College football coaches are grossly overpaid - just like C.E.O.s.
Columnist Page



OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Why #RussiaInvadedUkraine Matters
By CHRYSTIA FREELAND
Linguistic clarity is essential for moral clarity. Retweet that.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Sept. 6, 1901, President William B. McKinley was shot and mortally wounded by the anarchist Leon Czolgosz at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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Today's Headlines: Obama Delays Immigration Action, Yielding to Democratic Concerns-NYT-PALMERA777-4-07-09-14-10-11-12
Today's Headlines Sunday, September 7, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Magazine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

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Top News

Obama Delays Immigration Action, Yielding to Democratic Concerns
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR
In putting off action until after the November elections, President Obama was acting out of concern for Senate Democrats on the ballots, White House officials said on Saturday.
In Remote Detention Center, a Battle on Fast Deportations



Foreign Powers Buy Influence at Think Tanks
By ERIC LIPTON, BROOKE WILLIAMS and NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Prominent Washington think tanks, nonprofits known for their impartiality, have received tens of millions of dollars from foreign governments while pushing United States government officials to adopt policies that often reflect the donors' priorities, an investigation by The New York Times has found.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
Refugees Reshape Their Camp, at the Risk of Feeling at Home
By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN
The construction of a public square in a deeply conservative Palestinian refugee camp has made some there feel more at home, a provocative concept in camps conceived as temporary.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

ARTS
INTERACTIVE FEATURE: Fall Arts Preview - Times 100
How to wade through the crush of culture coming your way this season? Here's a guide to 100 events that have us especially excited, in order of appearance.

| THE UPSHOT
Why Democrats Can't Win the House
By NATE COHN
Thanks to demographics, the Republicans have a virtual stranglehold on the House of Representatives.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"We need to open our eyes. This is not going to stop."
AHMED HIRSI, a banker who has led youth groups in the Minneapolis area, referring to young men and women in the Somali community there who are turning to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Players in the Coalition Against ISIS
The Obama administration is now leading a coalition of nations to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.
Related Article



VIDEO: In the Studio | Diane von Furstenberg
Diane von Furstenberg chats with Vanessa Friedman about how her fashionably eclectic office in the Meatpacking District doubles as a living space and a reflection of the DVF brand.

VIDEO: Driven | 2014 Volkswagen Tiguan SEL
An aging German maintains its moves, but stumbles over the numbers.
Related Review


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Cease-Fire in Ukraine Holds, but Soldiers and Residents Doubt It Will Last
By CARLOTTA GALL and NEIL MacFARQUHAR
The cease-fire between the Ukrainian government and Russian-backed separatists held on Saturday, but some violations were reported, and soldiers and civilians doubted that calm would prevail.

Syrian Bombs Hit ISIS-Held Territory
By ANNE BARNARD
At least 25 people, mostly civilians, were killed in the northeastern province of Raqqa as government forces attacked territory controlled by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

To Draw in New Crowds, an Industry Bets on Itself
By MARTIN FACKLER
With new halls that are bigger, cleaner, more luxurious and friendlier, the pachinko industry is trying to reinvent itself by appealing to new customers and by cleaning up its image.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

For Jihad Recruits, a Pipeline From Minnesota to Militancy
By JACK HEALY
The intertwined journeys of two friends toward militancy offer a sharp example of how the allure of Islamist extremism has evolved, enticing similar pools of young Americans to conflicts in different parts of the world.
Redactions in U.S. Memo Leave Doubts on Data Surveillance Program
By CHARLIE SAVAGE
Questions persist after the release of a newly declassified version of a legal memo approving the National Security Agency's Stellarwind program, a set of warrantless surveillance and data collection activities secretly authorized after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Lessons From Losses Drive Massachusetts Candidates
By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
Martha Coakley, a Democrat, and Charlie Baker, a Republican, were stung in 2010, but both are favored to win in the primary for governor on Tuesday.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Challenging the President ... but Only on the Golf Course
By JASON HOROWITZ
Marvin Nicholson, the White House travel director, who has played golf with the president about 140 times, rounds out the president's foursomes and soothes his frayed feelings.

WHITE HOUSE MEMO
As Crises Pile Up, a President Sticks to His Deliberative Approach
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
President Obama's determination to move deliberately and line up support from allies before confronting threats means that he has sometimes appeared to be a spectator to events outside his control.

Light Pre-Election Schedule in Congress Matches Legislative Goals
By JONATHAN WEISMAN
Passing a stopgap spending bill and keeping the Export-Import Bank open are among the modest objectives that lawmakers have set this month.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Just 13, and Working Risky 12-Hour Shifts in the Tobacco Fields
By STEVEN GREENHOUSE
Public health experts say hundreds of children under 16 continue to work in America's tobacco fields, where they are exposed to harmful chemicals like nicotine.

THE UPSHOT
The Motherhood Penalty vs. the Fatherhood Bonus
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
A study finds that having a child helps your career, if you are a man. For women, it does the opposite.

Greek Leader Promises Cuts in Oil and Income Taxes
By NIKI KITSANTONIS
Prime Minister Antonis Samaras announced a 30 percent cut to a heating oil levy and a reduction to a so-called solidarity tax on income.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

The Jack Ma Way
By DAVID BARBOZA
Alibaba, started by Jack Ma in 1999, is about to sell shares in the United States that could value the company at about $160 billion.
Graphic: Circle of Friends



TECHNOPHORIA
OkCupid's Unblushing Analyst of Attraction
By NATASHA SINGER
Christian Rudder, president of the online dating service OkCupid, says websites like his should conduct more research, not less, on users' habits.

BITS BLOG
How Big Companies and Their Tech Suppliers Are Changing Together
By QUENTIN HARDY
Moves this week by companies like Google and Box illustrate how much the cloud and mobility are reshaping the workplace, as well as the tech companies themselves.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

U.S. Open 2014: Roger Federer Is Ousted by Marin Cilic in Semifinal
By HARVEY ARATON
Marin Cilic, seeded 14th, beat second-seeded Roger Federer in straight sets and will face Kei Nishikori, who upset top-seeded Novak Djokovic, in Monday's final.

A First for a Player, Who's One Win Away
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Kei Nishikori became the first man from Asia to reach a Grand Slam singles final by defeating top-seeded Novak Djokovic, 6-4, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3.

In the Wee Hours, Japan Erupts in Celebration
By HIROKO TABUCHI
In Japan, tennis fans rejoiced as Kei Nishikori became the first man from Japan, and Asia, to reach a Grand Slam final.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Anti-Pop Star (Except for Those Hooks)
By JON CARAMANICA
Charli XCX, a Myspace prodigy, is developing into a more mature performer.

Immersive Sound Fills a Factory
By BEN RATLIFF
The Basilica Soundscape festival offers two days of aggressive and immersive music.

Diversity in Action, as Well as in Words
By BILL CARTER
New ABC shows feature an Asian family comedy, a black actress as the star of a new drama, and a black family comedy.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

On Eve of the Democratic Primary, Cuomo Briefly Hits the Campaign Trail
By THOMAS KAPLAN
Three days before the state's Democratic primary, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York made two appearances, in Manhattan and Queens, his first political outing of the campaign season.

The Rise and Fall of the Biggest Pot Dealer in New York City History
By ALAN FEUER
An elaborate case led to the discovery, and subsequent arrest, of Jimmy Cournoyer, a French Canadian playboy and international criminal.

Some Chinese Tourists Visit New York but Sleep in New Jersey
By JAMES BARRON
With the number of Chinese tourists to New York soaring, New Jersey has become an unlikely base camp for many of them.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Magazine

So Bill Gates Has This Idea for a History Class ...
By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
Should one of the world's richest men get to dictate the future of how we learn about our past?

Why Flunking Exams Is Actually a Good Thing
By BENEDICT CAREY
To learn how to study, start by bombing a pretest.

The Battle for New York Schools: Eva Moskowitz vs. Mayor Bill de Blasio
By DANIEL BERGNER
The fight between two liberal crusaders with profoundly divergent ideas about how to aid and educate the disempowered.
For more from the Sunday magazine, go to NYTimes.com/Magazine »

Obituaries

Lillian Gobitas Klose, 90, Dies; Stood Against Mandatory Pledge
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
In 1935 Ms. Klose heeded a Jehovah's Witnesses leader's call to refuse to recite the pledge in compliance with biblical commands against idolatry.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Justice in St. Louis County
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The Justice Department's civil rights investigation into policing in the town where Michael Brown was killed should extend to neighboring towns.
From Bad to Worse With Ebola

Limbo and Cruelty at Guantánamo


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Demanding More From College
By FRANK BRUNI
In a world of many separate camps, college can and should be a bridge.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Is It WWIII or Just Twitter?
By MAUREEN DOWD
President Obama blames social media for our knowing just how messy the world is.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Sunday Review

NEWS ANALYSIS
Why Don't More Men Go Into Teaching?
By MOTOKO RICH
A change in the gender imbalance could sway the way teaching is regarded, and help it attract the best candidates.

ON THIS DAY
On Sept. 7, 1940, the German air force began its blitz on London during World War II.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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Today's Headlines: Obama Enlists 9 Allies to Help in the Battle Against ISIS
Today's Headlines Saturday, September 6, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Travel | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Obama Enlists 9 Allies to Help in the Battle Against ISIS
By HELENE COOPER
President Obama escalated the U.S. response to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria on Friday, recruiting at least nine allies to help crush the organization and offering the outlines of a strategy that echoes the war on terror.

Ukraine Deal Imposes Truce Putin Devised
By NEIL MacFARQUHAR
Whether the cease-fire between Ukraine's government and separatists lasts will probably be determined by the outcome of negotiations over the political future of the southeastern region.
On Ukraine, West Sidesteps a Fraught Term: 'Invasion'



Ebola Is Taking a Second Toll, on Economies
By ADAM NOSSITER
The disease, and the hysteria it has caused, is already having a serious economic impact, in part because some countries are closing down borders.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S.
Wary 'Normal' in Ferguson, Mo.
By TODD HEISLER
After the killing of a black teenager by a white police officer sparked a string of protests in Ferguson, Mo., the town is returning to a new normal as scars of the unrest remain.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Atlantic City's Next Gamble
By NELSON JOHNSON
Lessons from the boss of the original boardwalk empire.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"If I go back to Honduras, it is certain death."
HEIDY LARA CARBALLO, a young Honduran woman told an immigration judge in her successful bid to remain in the United States.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Players in the Coalition Against ISIS
The Obama administration is now leading a coalition of nations to fight the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

VIDEO: This Week's Movies | Sept. 5, 2014
The New York Times film critics review "The Congress," "Kelly & Cal" and "Last Days In Vietnam."

VIDEO: What Is Alibaba?
Alibaba, China's largest e-commerce company, is preparing to go public in New York, setting up expectations for the biggest stock market debut in United States history.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

ADVERTISEMENT


World

NATO Plans a Special Force to Reassure Eastern Europe and Deter Russia
By STEVEN ERLANGER, JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and STEPHEN CASTLE
The decision to form the force was meant to send a message to Russia that NATO's principle of collective security is sacrosanct.
Strikes Killed Militant Chief in Somalia, U.S. Reports
By HELENE COOPER, ERIC SCHMITT and JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
The Pentagon said it had confirmed that airstrikes Monday killed the leader of the Shabab, the Somalia militant network affiliated with Al Qaeda.
Jet Carrying Contractors Is Ordered to Land in Iran
By PETER BAKER and ERIC SCHMITT
The United States attributed the episode to a bureaucratic issue and not a larger political incident. The plane was later allowed to depart Iran, and by Friday night, had landed in Dubai, officials said.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

In Remote Detention Center, a Battle on Fast Deportations
By JULIA PRESTON
A corps of volunteers is changing the nature and purpose of a temporary outpost that the Obama administration set up to hold illegal immigrants briefly until they could be deported.

Louisiana Judge Rejects Suit Over Landrieu's Residency
By JEREMY ALFORD
A state district judge on Friday threw out a lawsuit claiming that Senator Mary L. Landrieu lives full time in Washington and cannot represent Louisiana, saying it was premature.

ON RELIGION
As Iraqi Christians in U.S. Watch ISIS Advance, They See 'Slow-Motion Genocide'
By SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN
Worshipers at the Mother of God Chaldean Catholic Church in Southfield, Mich., have been trying desperately to raise awareness about persecution in their home country.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

ADVERTISEMENT





Politics

Virginians, Surprised by Ex-Governor's Conviction, Ponder the Fallout
By TRIP GABRIEL
Politicians consider new ethics rules in a state with notoriously lax ones and the possible consequences if state legislators do not substantially limit gifts public officials can receive.

Christie's Trip Looks Like a Campaign for President
By MICHAEL BARBARO
The tour of Mexico by Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey has some of the trappings of a presidential campaign, with local traffic stopping for his motorcade, with aides enforcing protocol and with efforts to put the governor in the best possible light.
Video: Christie Addresses Trade in Mexico



Candidate Not on Providence Primary Ballot Stirs Mayoral Field
By JESS BIDGOOD
With signature bombast and zeal, Vincent A. Cianci Jr. has exerted outsize influence as candidates scrambled to avoid indirectly helping him by splitting the vote.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

DEALBOOK
As Its Initial Offering Nears, Alibaba Gets Ready for a Splashy Debut
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
The company, which runs two huge online marketplaces in China, plans to kick off a long-awaited roadshow for potential investors on Monday.



Job Growth Is Sluggish, Raising Fear of Malaise
By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ
With only 142,000 jobs added, August was the first month since January in which the economy failed to add at least 200,000 jobs. Unemployment fell slightly to 6.1 percent.
The Upshot: Not Good, Not Terrible Either



Silicon Valley Fights Order to Pay Bigger Settlement in Hiring Case
By DAVID STREITFELD
Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe filed papers asking the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to spurn Judge Lucy H. Koh's rejection of their $324.5 million antitrust settlement as too meager.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Two Cities With Blazing Internet Speed Search for a Killer App
By CONOR DOUGHERTY
Both Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan., have Google Fiber, a high-speed fiber-optic network, and are having a hard time figuring out what to do with so much power.

BITS | STATE OF THE ART
Taking a Naked Selfie? Your Phone Should Step In to Protect You
By FARHAD MANJOO
Our phones don't do nearly enough to protect our most sensitive documents: indelicate photos of ourselves.

So Bill Gates Has This Idea for a History Class ...
By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
Should one of the world's richest men get to dictate the future of how we learn about our past?
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

A Scare and a Disheartening Victory
By LYNN ZINSER
Wozniacki beat Peng in a semifinal match when Peng retired because of a heat-related illness with the score, 7-6 (1), 4-3. Wozniacki will face Serena Williams in the final.

ON TENNIS
Focused Ferocity by Serena Williams on a Stage She Owns at the U.S. Open
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Having won her semifinal against Ekaterina Makarova in one hour at Arthur Ashe Stadium, Williams is poised to win her third U.S. Open title in a row.

The Man Who Spins Pinstripes Into Gold
By RICHARD SANDOMIR
Brandon Steiner has been a force in the sports memorabilia business since the early 1990s, and he is a key figure in the selling of Derek Jeter's final season with the Yankees.
Slide Show: The King of Collectibles


For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

The Heir's Not Apparent
By RANDY KENNEDY
A legal battle over the work of the photographer Vivian Maier could hide it away for years.

Vienna State Opera's Music Director Resigns
By MICHAEL COOPER and REBECCA SCHMID
The general music director, Franz Welser-Möst, cited "irreconcilable differences" for his decision and withdrew from all his scheduled performances there.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
Rarity Returns: Jazz Club for Duos
By NATE CHINEN
Mezzrow, a cozy jazz piano room in Greenwich Village, is the latest effort to fill a void left when Bradley's closed in 1996.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

Settlement Is Approved in Central Park Jogger Case, but New York Deflects Blame
By BENJAMIN WEISER
The five men who were convicted will share $41 million, or about $1 million for each year spent in prison.
Cuomo Assuming Campaign Mode Just Days Before Votes Are Cast
By THOMAS KAPLAN and DAVID W. CHEN
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, who is expected to win the Democratic primary on Tuesday, will make his first election-season outing this weekend.

New York Will Require More Builders to Add Affordable Units
By MATT A.V. CHABAN and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Mayor Bill de Blasio's planning chief, Carl Weisbrod, disclosed a new policy to spur construction of housing for low- or middle-income residents.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Travel

To Ride Again Another Day in Colorado
By ELI GOTTLIEB
Months after heavy rains flooded Boulder, a former resident returns to assess the area's cycling culture.

EXPLORER
Mud, Worms and Ropes: A One-Day Survival Course
By LINDSAY CROUSE
A class from the Bear Grylls Survival Academy teaches participants tricks for negotiating the wild.

FRUGAL TRAVELER
8 Portland, Ore., Meals for $8 or Under
By SETH KUGEL
From a sandwich that's "just automatically delicious" to an item that "boggles the mind," here's a menu for frugal eats in the Northwest city.
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »

Obituaries

Andrew Kay, Pioneer in Computing, Dies at 95
By JOHN MARKOFF
Mr. Kay's company Kaypro produced the Kaypro II computer, a hit in the 1980s, but fell into bankruptcy after being left behind by an industry coalescing around the MS-DOS operating system.

Charlie Powell, a Standout Regardless of the Sport, Dies at 82
By BRUCE WEBER
Described by a San Diego newspaper as "arguably the greatest athlete ever to come out of San Diego County," Powell excelled at pro football, baseball and boxing.

Marjorie Strider, Sly Pop Artist, Is Dead at 83
By RANDY KENNEDY
Ms. Strider, best-known, perhaps, for her pinup paintings, described them as "a satire of men's magazines."
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
A Cease-Fire in Ukraine
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
It would be a mistake to assume that the agreement guarantees a quick or easy path to stability for the country.
Jobs Stall and So Does the Economy

The 'Secure Communities' Illusion


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Passion for the Pill
By GAIL COLLINS
In Congressional races across the country, women's issues are looming large. Just listen to some of the Republican candidates.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Price of Glory
By JOE NOCERA
College football coaches are grossly overpaid - just like C.E.O.s.
Columnist Page



OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Why #RussiaInvadedUkraine Matters
By CHRYSTIA FREELAND
Linguistic clarity is essential for moral clarity. Retweet that.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Sept. 6, 1901, President William B. McKinley was shot and mortally wounded by the anarchist Leon Czolgosz at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y.
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Today's Headlines: BP May Be Fined Up to $18 Billion for Spill in Gulf-NYT-PALMERA777-4-07-09-14-7-8-9
Today's Headlines Friday, September 5, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Movies | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

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Top News

BP May Be Fined Up to $18 Billion for Spill in Gulf
By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON and CLIFFORD KRAUSS
A federal judge determined that the company's conduct made it chiefly responsible for the oil well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico that killed 11 workers.
Document: Ruling on the 2010 Gulf of Mexico Oil Well Blowout



Former Governor in Virginia Guilty in Bribery Case
By TRIP GABRIEL
Former Gov. Bob McDonnell of Virginia and his wife, Maureen, were convicted of doing favors for a businessman in exchange for gifts and loans.


Hurricane Sandy Recovery Program in New York City Was Mired by Its Design
By RUSS BUETTNER and DAVID W. CHEN
Thousands of families remain frustrated by New York City's residence rebuilding program, Build It Back, which has been stalled by design and execution problems largely attributable to the Bloomberg administration.

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Editors' Picks

ARTS
Joan Rivers, a Comic Stiletto Quick to Skewer, Is Dead at 81
By ROBERT D. McFADDEN
From the stage and the red carpet, Ms. Rivers reveled in skewering the rich and famous with cutting remarks and a caustic wit.
Video: 50 Years of Funny

Appraisal: A Comic Without a Shut-Off Switch

New York State to Investigate Death



OPINION | ROOM FOR DEBATE
Why Don't Americans Take Vacation?
Why aren't we taking time off? Is it because we're a culture of workaholics or are companies not doing enough to accommodate paid vacation?


QUOTATION OF THE DAY"Be a good boy. And no biting."
TIFFANY WILSON, whispering to her 4-year-old son on his first day of prekindergarten in the Bronx.



Today's Video
VIDEO: Joan Rivers: 50 Years of Funny
Moments from the groundbreaking career of Joan Rivers.
Related Obituary

Related Appraisal



VIDEO: Time to Cut the Cable Cord
Molly Wood reviews new devices from Roku and TiVo that offer Internet-enabled alternatives to costly cable TV plans.
Related Column



VIDEO: Anatomy of a Scene | 'Eleanor Rigby'
The writer and director Ned Benson narrates a sequence from his drama "The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them."
Related Article


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World

On Ukraine, the West Sidesteps a Fraught Term
By ANDREW HIGGINS
After four months of fighting in eastern Ukraine, few countries have chosen the word "invasion" to describe the slow-burning war.


Shellshocked Ukrainians Flee to New Lives in Russia
By ANDREW ROTH
Hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians have found their way into Russia, clinging to promises of work, shelter, pensions and a path to citizenship.


Argentine Dinosaur Was an Estimated 130,000 Pounds, and Still Growing
By KENNETH CHANG
The 85-foot-long dinosaur, whose remains were discovered in 2005 in Argentina but took years to excavate and prepare for study, is among the largest land animals ever.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.
Study of Jewish Women Shows Link to Cancer Without Family History
By RONI CARYN RABIN
Women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent who tested positive for cancer-causing genetic mutations have high rates of breast and ovarian cancer even without a family history of the disease, researchers said.

IV Misplaced in Oklahoma Execution, Report Says
By ERIK ECKHOLM
Officials at the prison also erred by covering the inmate's groin, where the injection was made, preventing them from seeing the problem.
Document: Report on the Execution of Clayton Lockett



Town Becomes a Beer Ad, but Residents Don't Feel Like a Party
By JULIE TURKEWITZ
Anheuser-Busch will fly 1,000 young adults to a Colorado ski town for a weekend of spring-break-style revelry, a stunt designed to publicize Bud Light.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

National G.O.P. Moves to Take Over Campaign of a Kansas Senator
By JONATHAN MARTIN
The campaign of Senator Pat Roberts, and the hopes of Republicans for taking control of the Senate, have been threatened by the sudden withdrawal of the Democrat in the race.

Federal Judge Orders Ohio to Undo Cuts to Early Voting
By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
The preliminary injunction issued by Judge Peter C. Economus was a setback for Gov. John R. Kasich, and could affect the upcoming elections in Ohio, a closely contested swing state.


Federal Inquiry of Ferguson Police Will Include Apparent Racial Profiling
By MATT APUZZO
The attorney general said the Justice Department would investigate whether the police in Ferguson, Mo., mistreated motorists or suspects in the years before the Michael Brown shooting.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business
Europe's Bank Takes Aggressive Steps
By JACK EWING and NEIL IRWIN
The new measures show resolve by the central bank. But its president called on eurozone leaders to do their part to stimulate the economy.
The Upshot: Credibility Needs to Rise More Than Inflation

DealBook: Promise From European Central Bank Is Also a Gamble



F.D.A. Allows First Use of a Novel Cancer Drug
By ANDREW POLLACK
The treatment unleashes the body's immune system against tumors, and will initially be used against advanced melanoma.


Nevada a Winner in Tesla's Battery Contest
By MATTHEW L. WALD
The company hopes the construction of a factory in Nevada will catalyze the entry of the electric car into the American market and provide as many as 6,500 manufacturing jobs.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

TechnologyHackers Breach Security of HealthCare.gov
By ROBERT PEAR and NICOLE PERLROTH
Hackers downloaded malicious software onto a test server, but did not steal any personal information on consumers, Obama administration officials said.


Oppposition Grows in Europe to Google Antitrust Proposal
By JAMES KANTER
Microsoft and two trade groups for German publishers said the plan to reduce Google's dominance of the search market was inadequate.


Apple Plans Smartwatch and Larger iPhones
By BRIAN X. CHEN
The watch, which is expected to include fitness tracking and wireless payment, will be the first new product unveiled under Tim Cook, who replaced Steve Jobs in 2011.
Bits Blog: Apple Says It Will Add New Security Measures After Celebrity Hack

Groups Accuse Apple Supplier of Labor Violations


For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
On Way Out, Federer Makes a U-Turn
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Roger Federer fended off two match points and came back from two sets down to defeat Gaël Monfils in a five-set quarterfinal match on Thursday night.


SEAHAWKS 36, PACKERS 16
Seahawks Trounce the Packers to Begin Their Title Defense
By KEN BELSON
Fueled by a noisy home crowd and an impressive performance from Percy Harvin, the Seahawks pulled away in the second half for a comfortable victory to open the N.F.L. season.


YANKEES 5, RED SOX 4
With Hopes Going, Going, Yankees' 9th-Inning Blasts Are Gone, Gone
By TIM ROHAN
Mark Teixeira and Chase Headley homered in the ninth inning to lead the Yankees' comeback win over the Red Sox.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
AN APPRAISAL
Relentless, With No Off Switch
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY
Joan Rivers seemed as if she just couldn't stop herself from telling jokes, driven by a desperation that was all her own.
Share Your Favorite Joan Rivers Joke



A WORD WITH: JOHN WATERS
Stories Writ in Eyebrow Pencil
By MELENA RYZIK
John Waters describes his 50-year retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center as the first nonironic career tribute he has ever received.


ART REVIEW
Visionaries Inhabiting the Margins
By ROBERTA SMITH
The New York folk painter Ralph Fasanella and the Dutch outsider artist Willem van Genk have thrilling, complementary shows at the American Folk Art Museum.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

Movies
'THE CONGRESS'
A Princess Bride in a Digital Forever
By MANOHLA DARGIS
Ari Folman's allegorical movie "The Congress" stars Robin Wright as a midcareer actress named Robin Wright, whom a studio wants to digitize for posterity.


'LAST DAYS IN VIETNAM'
Witnesses to the Collapse
By A. O. SCOTT
Rory Kennedy's documentary "Last Days in Vietnam" examines the fall of Saigon and the evacuation of Americans and Vietnamese.


'KELLY & CAL'
Cornered, They Reach for Their Sex Pistols
By STEPHEN HOLDEN
"Kelly & Cal," starring Juliette Lewis, centers on a punk rocker turned bored suburban mother who takes up with a 17-year-old in a wheelchair.

For more movie news and reviews, go to NYTimes.com/Movies »

N.Y./Region
51,000 Answer de Blasio's Bell for New Pre-K
By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS and KATE TAYLOR
More than 50,000 children were the first students in the city's expanded program, and many were delighted to take part.


New York Police Officers to Start Using Body Cameras in a Pilot Program
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
A federal judge had ordered the department to test the cameras for one year in five police precincts, though the introduction of the cameras was not done in consultation with the court.


ABOUT NEW YORK
From Looms Came Computers, Which Led to Looms That Save Fashion Week
By JIM DWYER
Computerized looms in the garment district operate round the clock, serving vital deadlines in a high-pressure business. That's fitting, because computers themselves arose from early looms.
More About New York Columns


For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Obituaries
Michael Katz, 75, Who Challenged View of Poverty, Dies
By PAUL VITELLO
Professor Katz, who taught at the University of Pennsylvania and was a founder of its urban studies program, challenged the prevailing view in the 1980s and '90s that poverty stemmed from the bad habits of the poor.


Sergio Rodrigues, Father of Brazilian Furniture Design, Dies at 86
By BRUCE WEBER
His tables, chairs and other living accessories were said to reflect the sociable, witty nature of the Brazilian national character.


Stan Goldberg, Who Drew Archie for Decades, Dies at 82
By DANIEL E. SLOTNIK
Mr. Goldberg, who drew Archie comics for more than 40 years, also worked closely with artists like Steve Ditko, Jack Kirby and Stan Lee.

For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

EditorialsEDITORIAL
In Afghanistan, Time for Compromise
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The failure to reach a power-sharing deal by the two candidates vying for president could have catastrophic consequences.
A Blunt Defense of Marriage Equality

Encouraging End-of-Life Talks

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's 'Disservice to Democracy'


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed
OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Why Do Doctors Commit Suicide?
By PRANAY SINHA
A culture of stoicism puts fledgling physicians at risk.


OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Body and the Spirit
By DAVID BROOKS
Trying to understand the strong visceral responses to the executions of the American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Deflation Caucus
By PAUL KRUGMAN
What is it that makes a powerful faction in our body politic demand tight money even in a depressed, low-inflation economy?

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAYOn Sept. 5, 1972, Palestinian terrorists attacked the Israeli Olympic team at the summer games in Munich; 11 Israeli athletes and coaches, five terrorists and a police officer were killed.
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Today's Headlines: Escaping Death in Northern Iraq
Today's Headlines Thursday, September 4, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Fashion & Style | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

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Top News

VIDEO FEATURE
Escaping Death in Northern Iraq
By TIM ARANGO
Ali Hussein Kadhim, an Iraqi soldier, was captured with hundreds of other soldiers by Sunni militants in June. As a Shiite, he was marked for death. [Video includes graphic images.]

Putin Lays Out Proposal to End Ukraine Conflict
By NEIL MacFARQUHAR
President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia listed seven steps that he said were necessary for a cease-fire in the conflict in eastern Ukraine and said that he and the president of Ukraine, Petro O. Poroshenko, had a similar understanding about what was needed.

Cuts at W.H.O. Hurt Response to Ebola Crisis
By SHERI FINK
The Ebola epidemic has exposed gaping holes in the ability to tackle outbreaks in an increasingly interconnected world.
W.H.O. Leader Describes the Agency's Ebola Operations


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Editors' Picks

U.S.
INTERACTIVE GRAPHIC: The Race Gap in America's Police Departments
Hundreds of police departments across the nation have forces with a white percentage that is more than 30 percentage points higher than the communities they serve.

OPINION | OPINIONATOR | THE STONE
ISIS Is a Disgrace to True Fundamentalism
By SLAVOJ ZIZEK
If these so-called fundamentalists believe they have found their way to Truth, why are they threatened by nonbelievers?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"It's about time. Discrimination has no place on America's streets, least of all on Fifth Avenue."
SARAH KATE ELLIS, the president of the gay rights group Glaad, after the organizers of New York City's St. Patrick's Day parade lifted a ban on gay groups participating in the march.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Echoes of Light
Light from exploding stars can live on in the form of echoes, rippling across space and illuminating clouds of dust and gas that might otherwise be invisible.
Related Article



VIDEO: 36 Hours in Nashville
Music City is amped for a comeback, driven by local creativity, entrepreneurship and a D.I.Y. attitude.
Related Article



VIDEO: Glenn Close's Characters
Glenn Close is returning to Broadway for the first time in nearly 20 years to star in Edward Albee's "A Delicate Balance." She talks about what has drawn her to various roles in theater and film.
Related Article


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World
Steven Sotloff, U.S. Hostage Slain by ISIS, Was Also a Citizen of Israel
By ISABEL KERSHNER
The Jewish roots and Israeli past of Steven J. Sotloff, a journalist from Miami, were kept hidden until hope for his survival was no longer possible.

Hamas Emerges Buoyant Despite Bloodshed and Devastation in Gaza
By JODI RUDOREN
Polls show an unprecedented spike in support for Hamas despite a lack of basic needs like electricity and clean water, as Gaza residents blame others for the devastation.

Seeing Women as Key to Economy, Japan's Leader Names 5 to Cabinet
By MARTIN FACKLER
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's reshuffled cabinet was an apparent nod toward his promises to raise the status of women in the workplace.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Justice Dept. Inquiry to Focus on Practices of Police in Ferguson
By MATT APUZZO and MANNY FERNANDEZ
The inquiry is in addition to the F.B.I. civil rights investigation that is looking specifically into the shooting of Michael Brown on Aug. 9.
Federal Judge, Bucking Trend, Affirms Ban on Same-Sex Marriages in Louisiana
By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON
Until Wednesday, there had been 21 consecutive federal court decisions finding gay marriage bans unconstitutional.

Florida Prosecutors Face Long Odds When Police Use Lethal Force
By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
Florida's experience shows that it is extraordinarily difficult to prosecute, let alone convict, law enforcement officials for killing someone in the line of duty.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

POLITICAL MEMO
Voting Restrictions Are Key Variable in Midterm Elections
By JOHN HARWOOD
Eight states have narrowed early-balloting opportunities, and three of them feature Senate races that could decide which party holds a majority.
V.A. Rules May Enable Benefits Long Denied to Vietnam-Era Veterans
By DAVE PHILIPPS
Thousands of Vietnam-era veterans denied benefits because of less-than-honorable discharges may be eligible for upgrades if their misconduct was related to post-traumatic stress disorder.

In Speech on Mexico Trip, Gov. Christie Lays Out Vision for Energy 'Renaissance'
By MICHAEL BARBARO
Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey called for an end to Washington's 40-year ban on crude oil exports and faster approval of natural gas pipelines between the United States and Mexico.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Michael Bloomberg to Return to Lead Company He Founded
By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
Only eight months after ending his final term as mayor of New York City, Michael R. Bloomberg has decided to resume the leadership of his business empire.
August Sales Fall for G.M. as Trucks Lift Chrysler
By AARON M. KESSLER
General Motors' sales streak came to an end with a 1 percent decline in August, but Chrysler sales jumped 20 percent; Ford sales were flat.

DEALBOOK
Racial Tension in Focus, but a Housing Problem Looms
By MATTHEW GOLDSTEIN
In Ferguson and other close suburbs of St. Louis, out-of-state investment firms have bought distressed homes to rent them out, a consequence of foreclosures from the financial crisis.


For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Path of Stolen Credit Cards Leads Back to Home Depot Stores
By NICOLE PERLROTH
Bank and computer security company employees and law enforcement officials are tracing the track taken by the latest batch of stolen cards.

STATE OF THE ART
Grading Teachers, With Data From Class
By FARHAD MANJOO
Panorama Education, aided by prominent tech investors, is refining student feedback through innovative data collection. School systems are embracing the concept.

MACHINE LEARNING
New Roku and TiVo Devices Make Cutting the Cable Cord Plausible
By MOLLY WOOD
Complex Internet-to-TV setups have long discouraged many from doing away with their cable, but the technology is finally becoming more approachable.
Machine Learning Video: Time to Cut the Cable Cord


For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

Another Endurance Test on the Way to the Semifinals
By LYNN ZINSER and BEN ROTHENBERG
Kei Nishikori battled through another five-set match, defeating Stan Wawrinka and becoming the first Japanese man to make a semifinal of the United States championships since 1918.

Patrick McEnroe Out as U.S.T.A. Player Development Head
By MARY PILON and ANDREW W. LEHREN
McEnroe's efforts have borne the brunt of the criticism as Americans have lost their place in the upper echelon of professional tennis.

Novak Djokovic Defeats Andy Murray to Reach U.S. Open Semifinals
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Murray used a barrage of baseline forehands to keep the match close, but he struggled through pain as Djokovic took command and advanced to his eighth straight semifinal in Flushing Meadows.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Arts Center at Ground Zero Shelves Gehry Design
By ROBIN POGREBIN
The board of the performing arts center planned for the World Trade Center scuttled Frank Gehry's plan and will select a new design.

Picasso Museum to Reopen at Last, With New Leader
By DOREEN CARVAJAL
The Picasso Museum in Paris, under a new director, Laurent Le Bon, is to reopen after five years of renovation, a staff revolt and other drama.

THEATER REVIEW | 'TRADE PRACTICES'
Buy Downstage, Sell Upstage
By ALEXIS SOLOSKI
"Trade Practices," presented on Governors Island, explores investing and market forces using swordplay and song-and-dance numbers.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

Gay Groups to March in St. Patrick's Day Parade as a Ban Falls
By MARC SANTORA
The decision to allow a gay group to march under its own banner in the New York parade ends a policy that has prompted protests, court battles and bitter debate for decades.

Final Touches Range From Flowery to Frantic as Expanded Pre-K Awaits Start
By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS
Mayor Bill de Blasio's campaign promised free prekindergarten for every 4-year-old, and his administration has invested mightily in quickly bringing that plan to life.

For New York Legislators, Indictments Are No Obstacle to Seeking Re-election
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
Three state senators, each with more than 10 years of experience in office, will appear on primary ballots on Tuesday, despite having been indicted during the last 18 months.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Fashion & Style

Alexander Wang, Serving Two Masters
By VANESSA FRIEDMAN
At age 30, Alexander Wang has emerged as the most successful fashion designer of his generation, producing collections for both his own house and that of Balenciaga. Can Mr. Wang prove the skeptics wrong?
Slide Show: Mr. Wang's Designs



At WWD, a New Owner Tries to Change Course
By LAURA M. HOLSON
Jay Penske seeks a larger staff and expanded online presence.

UNBUTTONED
New York Fashion Week Guide: Whom and What to Know
By VANESSA FRIEDMAN
A guide to the key players as designers prepare to roll out the garments.
For more fashion news, go to NYTimes.com/Fashion »

Obituaries

Andrew Madoff, Who Told of His Father's Swindle, Dies at 48
By DIANA B. HENRIQUES
Mr. Madoff, the last surviving son of the convicted swindler Bernard L. Madoff, had mantle-cell lymphoma.

Andrew McLaglen, Director in the Heyday of Westerns, Dies at 94
By BRUCE WEBER
Mr. McLaglen directed stars like John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, James Arness and James Stewart, as well as many western television shows.

Charles Bowden, Author With Unblinking Eye on Southwest, Dies at 69
By WILLIAM YARDLEY
Mr. Bowden's work explored the brutality of life along the border between the United States and Mexico, underscoring the complexities of the drug trade.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
The Innocent on Death Row
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The exoneration of two North Carolina men provides a textbook example of so much that is broken in the American justice system.
Credit Rating Reform Comes Up Short


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
ISIS, Deep in the Heart of Texas
By CHARLES M. BLOW
A legitimate threat from foreign forces should not be used as fodder for anti-immigrant, enforcement-over-citizenship border politicians.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Down Side of Reclining
By GAIL COLLINS
The airplane-seat debate has become a bit of an aviation crisis, so maybe it's time for Congress to take up the issue.

OP-ED | LINDA GREENHOUSE
Tragedy or Triumph
By LINDA GREENHOUSE
In a Supreme Court case over presidential recess appointments, functional pragmatism wins over rigid formalism in constitutional interpretation.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Sept. 4, 1957, Gov. Orval Faubus of Arkansas called out the National Guard to prevent nine black students from entering Central High School in Little Rock.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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Today's Headlines: ISIS Says It Killed Steven Sotloff After U.S. Strikes in Northern Iraq
Today's Headlines Wednesday, September 3, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Dining & Wine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

ISIS Says It Killed Steven Sotloff After U.S. Strikes in Northern Iraq
By MARK LANDLER and ERIC SCHMITT
The group released a video showing the beheading of a second American, blaming President Obama for the death and raising the pressure on him to order strikes on the group in Syria.

Waging Desperate Campaign, Iraqi Town Held Off Militants
By AZAM AHMED
The siege of Amerli, a northern Shiite Turkmen community, is thought to be the first instance in which a town has kept ISIS at bay since the group began its march through Iraq.

U.S. and Europe Are Struggling With Response to a Bold Russia
By PETER BAKER and STEVEN ERLANGER
Officials hope that any new measures will have more impact than the economic sanctions imposed on Moscow so far.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

| THE UPSHOT
INTERACTIVE GRAPHIC: Elections 2014: Make Your Own Senate Forecast
Create and share your own forecast for who will win the midterm elections.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Help Families From Day 1
By CLARE HUNTINGTON
Universal pre-K is a huge step forward. Now let's start earlier.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"A long time ago, I wanted to find me a good wife, I wanted to raise a family, I wanted to have my own business and everything. I never got a chance to realize those dreams. Now I believe that God is going to bless me to get back out there."
HENRY LEE McCOLLUM, who was declared innocent of murder and ordered released after three decades on death row in North Carolina.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Ukraine, Caught in a Vise
Behind the continuing military conflict in eastern Ukraine lies an economic split. The country is moving toward Europe, straining its longstanding ties with Russia.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Tehran Unfetters Cellphones, and the Pictures Start Flowing
By THOMAS ERDBRINK
In a victory for President Hassan Rouhani over hard-liners, Iranians can now do what people elsewhere have long done without thinking - easily send and receive photos and videos on their phones.

Airstrike in Somalia by U.S. Forces Targets Shabab Leader
By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN and HELENE COOPER
Somali and American officials said Tuesday that the leader of the Shabab, the Somali militant group that has allied itself with Al Qaeda, may have been killed.

BERLIN JOURNAL
Monument Seeks to End Silence on Killings of the Disabled by the Nazis
By MELISSA EDDY
In Germany, some 300,000 people were added to the list of those to be remembered as victims of the Holocaust.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

DNA Evidence Clears Two Men in 1983 Murder
By JONATHAN M. KATZ and ERIK ECKHOLM
Two mentally disabled half brothers who were convicted in the rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl 30 years ago were declared innocent and ordered released by a judge.

Arizona Police Report Says Parents Didn't Realize Daughter Had Shot Gun Instructor
By ADAM NAGOURNEY
The report detailed the death of an instructor at a shooting range in White Hills, Ariz., after a 9-year-old lost control of an Uzi.

Berkeley Pushes a Boundary on Medical Marijuana
By IAN LOVETT
Berkeley, a California city that has prided itself on its liberal policies, will require medical marijuana dispensaries to donate at least 2 percent of their cannabis to low-income residents.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

CONGRESSIONAL MEMO
After Eric Cantor's Exit, House Turns Sympathetic Ear From Big Business to Oil and Gas
By JONATHAN WEISMAN
Wall Street and Big Business have lost their most sympathetic ear, oil and gas industries are on the rise, and Louisiana once again has a booming voice.

Alaska Race Sees Democrat Quit Campaign for Governor
By KIRK JOHNSON
Byron Mallott said he would withdraw and run instead for lieutenant governor alongside an independent candidate, Bill Walker.

Judge Rejects Defense's Criteria for Convicting Ex-Governor Bob McDonnell as Jury Gets Case
By TRIP GABRIEL
The case against Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, who are facing corruption charges, will go into its second day of deliberations.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business
In Nude Celebrity Photos, Privacy Collides With the Wild Web
By MIKE ISAAC
After a trove of nude photos of celebrities is posted online, some champions of anything-goes social media are rueful.

Bracing for New Challenges in Year 2 of Health Care Law
By REED ABELSON
Early troubles under the Affordable Care Act are expected to be replaced by new difficulties as insurance prices fluctuate and more people sign up.

Publisher of The Washington Post Will Resign
By RAVI SOMAIYA
Katharine Weymouth, the publisher for almost seven years, will be replaced by Frederick J. Ryan Jr., a founder of Politico and a former Reagan administration official.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology
Home Depot Investigates a Possible Data Breach
By BRIAN X. CHEN
The retailer said it was investigating a report that customer credit and debit card data was stolen from its systems and put up for sale online.

BITS BLOG
German Court Bans Uber Service Nationwide
By MARK SCOTT and MELISSA EDDY
The order will stand until the court holds a hearing this year. Uber said it would continue to operate in Germany despite the threat of criminal charges and fines.
Bits Blog: Lyft Says Uber's Recruitment Efforts Are Hurting Drivers


DEALBOOK
IEX, Upstart Trading Platform, Raises $75 Million in New Financing
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
The stock trading platform created to temper high-frequency traders' advantages and profiled in Michael Lewis's book "Flash Boys" has raised money that will help the start-up become a full-fledged stock market.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

All That Back and Forth at the U.S. Open, Between Doubles Partners
By SARAH LYALL
Doubles players treat points as baseball or football players might, mapping out tactics in advance. At the same time, the teams use the between-point encounters to prop each other up.

Gaël Monfils vs. Roger Federer: Expect Sparks to Fly at the U.S. Open
By LYNN ZINSER and ZACH SCHONBRUN
In straight-set victories, Roger Federer advanced past No. 17 Roberto Bautista Agut and Gaël Monfils dispatched No. 7 Grigor Dimitrov, setting up a rematch just a few weeks after the two players last met.

ON TENNIS
Sleep-Deprived, but Into the Next Round
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Kei Nishikori advanced to the U.S. Open quarterfinals by defeating Milos Raonic in a five-set match that started on Monday night and ended Tuesday morning.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Book Portrays Eichmann as Evil, but Not Banal
By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER
A German philosopher, Bettina Stangneth, explores the voluminous memoirs of Adolf Eichmann, and her country's reluctance to prosecute him.

A View of the Heavens Needs Some Retouching
By WILLIAM GRIMES
"Meeting," by James Turrell, one of the most popular installations at MoMA PS1, with its open roof, is in need of restoration and has been closed for over a year.

A Family Album
By DAVE ITZKOFF
When your father is a rock star - in this case, Jeff Tweedy of Wilco - banding together to make an album might make more sense than rebelling.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region
New York Cancels or Postpones Opening of 45 Pre-K Programs
By KATE TAYLOR
Nine sites that would have served 265 students will not open because of safety concerns or other issues, officials announced two days before the first day of school.

Gov. Cuomo Is Running for a 2nd Term, but He Doesn't Have Much to Say About It
By THOMAS KAPLAN
The week before the Democratic primary, Andrew M. Cuomo continues to avoid uttering the name of his Democratic opponent, Zephyr Teachout, let alone debating her.

10 Years On, Scaffolding in Harlem Still a Shelter for Noxious Acts
By BENJAMIN MUELLER
The structure has become a favored spot for drug deals and neighborhood drama, angering locals who have been trying for years to get it removed.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Dining & Wine

RESTAURANT REVIEW | BAR PRIMI
There Is No Secondi Choice
By PETE WELLS
Pasta takes center stage at Bar Primi in the East Village.

Scouting the Scene
By JEFF GORDINIER
Intent on getting it right, the Mexican chef Enrique Olvera is out studying New York restaurants before opening his own, Cosme, one of the season's most anticipated newcomers.

Cue the Toucans and Iguanas
By JEFF GORDINIER
In its most basic form, an avocado taco is like a two-bite couplet in praise of Mexican ingredients.
For more dining news and recipes, go to NYTimes.com/Dining »

Obituaries

Lida Moser, Photographer With an Urban Eye, Dies at 93
By DANIEL E. SLOTNIK
Ms. Moser was a member of the Photo League, a group intent on capturing the reality of life, especially in New York City; her series on rural Quebec in 1950 became a classic portrait of that place and time.

Bernard F. Fisher, Honored for Bold Vietnam Rescue, Dies at 87
By PAUL VITELLO
Despite warnings, the aviator landed on an embattled airstrip where another flier had crashed, taxied under heavy fire to find him, and got his comrade and himself out alive.

Arthur H. White Dies at 90; Gauged Public Opinion and Encouraged Reading
By WILLIAM YARDLEY
Mr. White was a co-founder of the research firm Yankelovich, Skelly & White, who went on to help start many nonprofits, including Reading Is Fundamental.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
NATO's Urgent Challenges
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The alliance needs unite to push back against Vladimir Putin's expansionist tendencies.
The Elections Cop Invites Mischief

Charles Bowden, a Writer on the Edge


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Ready, Aim, Fire. Not Fire, Ready, Aim.
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Just what are we really dealing with in ISIS?
Columnist Page



OP-ED | MARK BITTMAN
Will China Defeat Obesity?
By MARK BITTMAN
If it goes the way of the West, its gains in life span may be eroded.

OP-ED | THOMAS B. EDSALL
What Makes People Poor?
By THOMAS B. EDSALL
Before we can get serious about inequality, the left, the right and the center need to realize that they have a lot to learn from each other.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Sept. 3, 1976, the unmanned U.S. spacecraft Viking 2 landed on Mars to take the first close-up, color photographs of the planet's surface.
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#WILLIE : “ LAS DIVAS EN LA Z (4)- PROGRAMA DE RADIO QUE EL NOMBRE DEL PROGRAMA HAGA PENSAR QUE SE VAA HABLAR DE KURSILERIA PERO AL REVEZ VAN AL FONDO DE TODAS LOS CASOS Y COSAS NACIONALES COMO INTERNACIONALE.S.O.N.: LAS 3:00 AM CANTAN SI TU NO ESTA S AKI.
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Today's Headlines: ISIS Displaying a Deft Command of Varied Media-NYT-PALMERA777-PAPYRO#4-31-08-14-7-8-9
Today's Headlines Sunday, August 31, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Magazine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

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Top News

ISIS Displaying a Deft Command of Varied Media
By SCOTT SHANE and BEN HUBBARD
ISIS, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, is using every contemporary mode of messaging to recruit fighters, intimidate enemies and promote its claim to have established a caliphate.

At Risk in Senate, Democrats Seek to Rally Blacks
By JONATHAN MARTIN
With their Senate majority imperiled, Democrats are trying to mobilize African-Americans outraged by the shooting in Ferguson, Mo., to help them retain control of at least one chamber of Congress.
Interactive: Who Will Win the Senate?



Using Gambling to Entice Low-Income Families to Save
By PATRICIA COHEN
A growing number of credit unions and nonprofit groups are using lotteries to encourage low-income families to save.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S.
At Ferguson March, Call to Halt Traffic in Labor Day Highway Protest
By MANNY FERNANDEZ and CAMPBELL ROBERTSON
In the continuing protests over the killing of a black teenager by a white police officer, protesters were encouraged to tie up traffic on the Labor Day holiday.

OPINION | OPINION
Saving Our Birds
By JOHN W. FITZPATRICK
Has the passing of the passenger pigeon taught us anything?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"I didn't have $500 to start a C.D., and when they said it was only $25, I knew I could do that. I got addicted when I won $100."
CINDI CAMPBELL, who won the $30,000 grand prize in a program at her North Carolina credit union that treats deposits as lottery entries.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Cheddar Scallion Dip
Melissa Clark makes a creamy cheese dip with orange juice and paprika that will be perfect for your child to snack on during lunch.

VIDEO: Money Talks. We Sing.
As the Metropolitan Opera's management and unions negotiated behind one set of closed doors, performers carried on with their rehearsals behind others.
Related Article


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World

Ukraine President Says Europe's Security Depends on Stopping Russia
By ANDREW HIGGINS and NEIL MacFARQUHAR
President Petro O. Poroshenko of Ukraine won no pledges of military assistance from the European Union, but his warnings helped set the stage for a new round of sanctions against Russia.

As Scots Weigh Independence, Wales Takes Note
By KATRIN BENNHOLD
Welsh nationalists have made the Scottish independence bid their own in the hope that it will stir passions at home - if not for full independence, at least for more self-government.

Palestinian May Push for Deadline to End Occupation
By RICK GLADSTONE
The president of the Palestinian Authority may use the annual United Nations General Assembly to publicly demand an end date for Israel's occupation.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Getting Ferguson Majority to Show Its Clout at Polls
By MONICA DAVEY
In the wake of the Michael Brown killing, there is a new focus on turnout in a suburb that is majority black but has mostly white elected leaders.
At Ferguson March, Call for Labor Day Highway Protest



Coverage for End-of-Life Talks Gaining Ground
By PAM BELLUCK
Medicare may cover advance care planning that was once decried as "death panels," and some private insurers are not waiting for the political process.

Massachusetts May Shut Down Casinos Before Even One Opens
By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
Massachusetts approved legislation in 2011 to allow three casinos and a slots parlor, and voters will decide in November whether to repeal the law before a single casino has been built.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Kochs' Network Wrestles With Expectations for Presidential Primaries
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Some activists involved in the political network overseen by Charles and David Koch are urging it to consider a more active role in the 2016 primaries.
California Closes In on Plastic-Bag Ban
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
California lawmakers have approved a measure that would make the state the first to impose a ban on single-use plastic bags.

California Governor Appeals Court Ruling Overturning Protections for Teachers
By ADAM NAGOURNEY
In a one-page appeal, Gov. Jerry Brown and the state attorney general, Kamala D. Harris, argued that a decision of such scope needed to be made by a higher court.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Hey, Chef: Next Time, Skip the Fennel
By DAVID SEGAL
A pop-up restaurant company is dedicated to the notion that high-end chefs should listen to their customers' feedback.
New Novartis Drug Effective in Treating Heart Failure
By ANDREW POLLACK
The experimental drug developed by the Swiss company Novartis reduced the risk of dying from cardiovascular causes and could replace what has been the bedrock treatment for more than 20 years, researchers said.

PROTOTYPE
No Canvas, No Leather: A Reboot for the Sneaker
By CLAIRE MARTIN
Unconventional footwear materials, like Tyvek, are offering a new take on the minimalist shoe trend.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

POWER UP
In E-Sports, Video Gamers Draw Real Crowds and Big Money
By NICK WINGFIELD
Professional video gaming is becoming a worldwide spectator sport offering big prizes to competitors and helping the game industry gain even greater cultural and economic clout.
DEALBOOK
Top Bitcoin Proponent to Plead Guilty to Federal Charge
By SYDNEY EMBER
Charles Shrem, a leading backer of Bitcoin, is to plead to one federal count of aiding and abetting an unlicensed money transmitting business.

BITS BLOG
Getting a Clear Picture of a Computer Network's Security
By NICOLE PERLROTH
It may be impossible to keep hackers out of a computer network. But one company offers a way to monitor threats once they get through the firewall.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

SPORTS OF THE TIMES
Michael Sam Has a Spot in History, if Not With the Rams
By WILLIAM C. RHODEN
Even after he was cut by the Rams on Saturday, Sam's selection in the N.F.L. draft and his impression in St. Louis remained a statement advancing equal opportunity.

Rams Cut Michael Sam, First Openly Gay Player Drafted in N.F.L.
By KEN BELSON
On the final day of cuts across the league, the St. Louis Rams released defensive lineman Michael Sam, a seventh-round pick out of Missouri.

Kvitova Is the Latest High Seed to Be Ousted; Djokovic Advances Easily
By NAILA-JEAN MEYERS
Aleksandra Krunic, a 21-year-old qualifier, knocked out Petra Kvitova, leaving the women's draw without its Nos. 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 seeds. On the men's side, Novak Djokovic dominated Sam Querrey.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

André 3000 Is Moving On in Film, Music and Life
By JON CARAMANICA
With a starring movie role and Outkast anniversary appearances, André 3000 has not been as reclusive as it might have seemed.

Karen O Goes Solo with 'Crush Songs'
By MELENA RYZIK
Karen O, perhaps best known as the frontwoman for the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, is out with a solo project, "Crush Songs."

Horror Is a Constant, as Artists Depict War
By ALISSA J. RUBIN
A correspondent for The Times visits "The Disasters of War, 1800-2014," a French museum show that illustrates how depictions of war have changed, and stayed the same.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

SNAPSHOT
A Tower in Brooklyn, but Soon Just a Memory
By VIVIAN YEE
The tower holding the Domino Sugar sign in Brooklyn is being torn down to make room for residential housing.

Picking Up an Elusive College Dream
By DIANA KAPP
For Tenille Warren, the burden of growing up poor was too heavy for even the offer of a free ride to college to counter. But, about to turn 38, she is back on track at the Fashion Institute of Technology.

Forensic Hydrology at the Gowanus Canal
By KEITH WILLIAMS
Eymund Diegel, an environmental planner who wants the cleanup of the canal done right, uses unorthodox forensic methods to account for the natural watershed, the underground springs and streams feeding the canal.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Magazine

Can Jill Soloway Do Justice to the Trans Movement?
By TAFFY BRODESSER-AKNER
With her new show, "Transparent," the director ventures into a world in which some of the smallest words in our language - pronouns - can cause the greatest offense.
Video: Exclusive Preview of 'Transparent'



Mitch McConnell Is Headed Down the Stretch
By JONATHAN MARTIN
A lifelong race to become the Senate majority leader comes down to whether he can make one last sprint.

The Dawn of the Post-Clinic Abortion
By EMILY BAZELON
Some activists like Rebecca Gomperts are now imagining the unthinkable: a future where most abortions happen at home.
Video: The Abortion Ship

The 6th Floor Blog: Opening Up the 'Abortion by Mail' Cover


For more from the Sunday magazine, go to NYTimes.com/Magazine »

Obituaries

John A. Walker Jr., Ringleader of Spy Family, Dies at 77
By WILLIAM YARDLEY
Mr. Walker was a Navy communications specialist when he began spying for the Soviets at the height of the Cold War in 1967.

Hal Finney, Cryptographer and Bitcoin Pioneer, Dies at 58
By NATHANIEL POPPER
Mr. Finney made advancing online privacy his life's work, and he took part in the first Bitcoin transaction, when Satoshi Nakamoto sent him 10 Bitcoins.

Werner Franz, Survivor of the Hindenburg's Crew, Dies at 92
By BRUCE WEBER
Mr. Franz was a 14-year-old cabin boy when the immense German zeppelin erupted into flames. He was believed to be the last surviving member of the crew.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Broken Promises on National Service
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Washington's dysfunction is resulting in missed opportunities to expand the public service program AmeriCorps.
Stop Hiding Images of American Torture

Endless Assault on Health Care Reform


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Between Godliness and Godlessness
By FRANK BRUNI
Religiously unaffiliated Americans are owed a larger, better vocabulary for their spirituality.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Diplomat and Warrior
By ROGER COHEN
We need Richard Holbrooke's skill and resolve today.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Sunday Review

NEWS ANALYSIS
Are Police Bigoted?
By MICHAEL WINES
Whether racial bias is a significant factor in shootings is an open question, and there are no reliable numbers which can provide the answer.

ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 31, 1997, Britain's Princess Diana died in a car crash in Paris at 36.
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Today's Headlines: U.S. Identifies Citizens Joining Rebels in Syria, Including ISIS
Today's Headlines Friday, August 29, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Movies | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

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Top News

U.S. Identifies Citizens Joining Rebels in Syria, Including ISIS
By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and ERIC SCHMITT
Nearly a dozen Americans are known to have traveled to Syria to fight for ISIS, the militant group that the Obama administration says poses the greatest threat to the United States since Al Qaeda before the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

As Ebola Grips Liberia's Capital, a Quarantine Sows Social Chaos
By NORIMITSU ONISHI
Monrovia has become, in a few short weeks, a major focal point of the epidemic, with the outbreak overwhelming the government of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

Obama Urges Calm in Face of Crises in Ukraine and Syria
By PETER BAKER
President Obama confronted two volatile crises with restraint Thursday, saying he was not close to authorizing airstrikes in Syria and playing down an escalation of Russia's intervention in Ukraine.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S.
Sam Kass, the Obamas' Foodmaster General
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER
Mr. Kass, the first family's personal chef, has one of the highest public profiles of anyone in the East Wing and a window into the zealously guarded space and tastes of the Obama White House.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
End the Tyranny of 24/7 Email
By CLIVE THOMPSON
Limiting work-related messaging during off-hours is both humane and efficient.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"They've got to start off fresh, get new friends, new neighbors. It might not show now, but maybe later on in life."
CELESTE WILSON, about the emotional toll on her children after the family was evicted from an apartment in Milwaukee.


Today's Video

VIDEO: The Abortion Ship
Rebecca Gomperts is a Dutch doctor who pushes the limits of abortion law. In this excerpt from Diana Whitten's documentary "Vessel," Gomperts creates a mobile clinic aboard a ship.
Related Article



VIDEO: This Week's Movies: August 29, 2014
The New York Times film critics review "Starred Up," "Through a Lens Darkly" and "The Notebook (Le Grand Cahier)."
Related Review: 'Starred Up'

Related Review: 'Through a Lens Darkly'

Related Review: 'The Notebook'



VIDEO: Anatomy of a Scene | 'Life of Crime'
Daniel Schechter narrates a sequence from his film "Life of Crime."
Related Review: 'Life of Crime'


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World

ISIS Said to Kill 150 Syrian Captives in 2 Days, Videotaping the Horror
By BEN HUBBARD
Dozens of men, possibly Syrian soldiers, were lined up in their underwear and gunned down. In the Golan Heights, non-ISIS rebels seized United Nations peacekeepers.

With Gaza War, Movement to Boycott Israel Gains Momentum in Europe
By STEVEN ERLANGER
The war in Gaza and its aftermath have inflamed opinion in Europe, analysts say, and are likely to increase support for campaigns to divest from and penalize Israel.
An App Tracking the Gaza Conflict Has Followers Near and Far



Ebola Could Strike 20,000, World Health Agency Says
By NICK CUMMING-BRUCE and ALAN COWELL
The forecast came as the World Health Organization said the overall toll had risen by more than 100, to 1,552 out of 3,069 cases in four West African countries.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

As Blackwater Trial Closes, Focus Turns to Moments Before Chaos
By MATT APUZZO and EMMARIE HUETTEMAN
Twelve American jurors, expected to begin deliberating next week, will have to decide whether the 2007 episode in Iraq was a massacre, a firefight or a horrible accident of war.
Video: Behind the Blackwater Trial



Democrats Wary of Benghazi Inquiry Stretching Into '16 Election Season
By JONATHAN WEISMAN and JENNIFER STEINHAUER
An investigation of the 2012 attack on a U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, will extend into next year, raising concerns among Democrats that Republicans are trying to hurt Hillary Rodham Clinton's presidential prospects.
Taser Use in Arrest Leads to Suit in Georgia
By ALAN BLINDER
Amid national attention to police shootings involving black men, Gregory L. Towns Jr.'s death seemed certain to provoke new discussion about the use in law enforcement of Tasers.
Document: Incident Report from East Point, Ga., Police Dept.


For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics
Pennsylvania to Purchase Private Care for Its Poor
By ABBY GOODNOUGH
Pennsylvania will become the 27th state to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, using federal funds to buy private health insurance for some 500,000 low-income residents starting next year.
Remaking Medicine: Expansion of Mental Health Care Hits Obstacles



THE UPSHOT
Two Senators Willing to Defy the Party Line
By DEREK WILLIS
Willingness to vote against the majority of one's party is something that has become much less common in the Senate.
Hillary Clinton Praises Obama on Ferguson Response and Echoes Call for Inquiry
By AMY CHOZICK
Mrs. Clinton, who had been criticized for not speaking out on the subject, praised Mr. Obama for deciding to send Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. to Ferguson, Mo.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

A New American Oil Bonanza
By CLIFFORD KRAUSS
United States refinery production in recent weeks reached record highs and left supply depots flush, cushioning the impact of all the instability surrounding traditional global oil fields.

Shell Submits a Plan for New Exploration of Alaskan Arctic Oil
By CLIFFORD KRAUSS
The company, which had experienced setbacks in its efforts in recent years, said it had not yet made a final decision on whether to drill next summer.
DealBook: Resurgence in Oil and Gas Sector Spurs Merger Boom


DEALBOOK
Businesses Are Winning Cat-and-Mouse Tax Game
By DAVID GELLES
Corporations are finding ways to legally avoid paying federal taxes, causing business income tax revenue to be stagnant.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

BITS BLOG
Uber and Lyft Have Become Indistinguishable Commodities
By FARHAD MANJOO
Though Uber and Lyft have become bitter enemies recently, in many places, they both offer ubiquitous, cheap and mostly high-quality service.

BITS BLOG
Questions for IBM's Watson
By STEVE LOHR
IBM's Watson keeps adding new features. But can it make money?
BITS BLOG
Google Joins Amazon in Dreams of Drone Delivery
By CONOR DOUGHERTY
Who needs UPS trucks and bicycle delivery when you can fly in things people buy online?
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

SPORTS OF THE TIMES
N.F.L. Rights a Wrong, but Only After Further (and Further) Review
By WILLIAM C. RHODEN
In a rarity for the league, Commissioner Roger Goodell issued an apology, but his more sensitive statement on domestic abuse in the wake of the Ray Rice case should have come much sooner.

Roger Goodell Toughens N.F.L. Domestic Violence Policy in Wake of Ray Rice Case
By KEN BELSON
The N.F.L. commissioner said that league employees would be suspended without pay for six games for a first offense involving domestic violence.

Even Amid Swirling Winds, Serena Williams Coasts Into Third Round
By LYNN ZINSER
Williams beat Vania King in the second round on Thursday, while eighth-seeded Ana Ivanovic was eliminated. On the men's side, Novak Djokovic, John Isner and Sam Querrey won in straight sets.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

The Dissatisfied: To Leave or Not to Leave?
By WILLIAM GRIMES
Boredom and irritation. A waiting train. Or deep disappointment. Ticketholders walk out of a show for varied reasons.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
The Delayed: To Sit or Not to Sit?
By ALASTAIR MACAULAY
Latecomers to the theater - and especially ballet - do more damage than they could imagine.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
Books Are Like Football, Only Safer
By DWIGHT GARNER
"Football: Great Writing About the National Sport" is among the new books on the game to greet the season.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

Movies

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
Film Festivals Scramble for First Dibs
By A. O. SCOTT
As the fall film festival season begins, audiences stampede to festivals as if being the first to see a film still mattered in the age of digital dispatches.

'THE NOTEBOOK'
Enduring War and Adults' Cruelty
By A. O. SCOTT
"The Notebook (Le Grand Cahier)," based on a novel by Agota Kristof, is a flinty parable of brutality and resilience: World War II seen through the eyes of twin boys.

'LIFE OF CRIME'
Husband of Kidnap Victim: Take My Wife, Please
By BEN KENIGSBERG
In "Life of Crime," a wife is held for ransom - but the husband was planning to leave her anyway.
For more movie news and reviews, go to NYTimes.com/Movies »

N.Y./Region

In First Year of Pre-K Expansion, a Rush to Beat the School Bell
By KATE TAYLOR
Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that 50,407 children had been enrolled in prekindergarten for this fall, and many pieces will have to fall into place by Sept. 4 for the program to go smoothly.

Drug-Selling Charges Dropped Against Man Arrested in Philip Seymour Hoffman Case
By JOHN LELAND
Robert Aaron, a musician and a friend of Mr. Hoffman's, had been charged with intent to sell heroin just days after his fatal drug overdose in February.

Law Boosts Oversight of Use of Solitary Confinement at Rikers Island
By MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ
The legislation will require the Correction Department to publish quarterly reports on the inmates in solitary confinement, but does not include provisions that will scale back its use as punishment.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Obituaries

Jeremiah Healy, Who Created Boston Private Eye, Dies at 66
By WILLIAM YARDLEY
Mr. Healy wrote multiple books starring John Francis Cuddy, a widower and Vietnam veteran whose cases often touched on social issues.

David Rosand, an Art History Scholar Whose Heart Was in Venice, Dies at 75
By HOLLAND COTTER
Mr. Rosand, who began teaching at Columbia in the mid-'60s, specialized in Venetian painting but had wide art knowledge beyond his immediate field.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Mr. Putin Tests the West in Ukraine
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Tougher sanctions are needed to show President Vladimir Putin of Russia that the West views his escalating aggression in Ukraine as a threat.
An Ominous Ebola Forecast

A Child's Visit to the Gun Range


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Mental Virtues
By DAVID BROOKS
How do you build character in front of your keyboard at work?
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Fall of France
By PAUL KRUGMAN
Has President François Hollande doomed the European project as the disastrous consequences of austerity policies grow more obvious with each passing month?
Columnist Page



ROOM FOR DEBATE
Homegrown Terrorists and the West
What can be done to stop young Muslims from adopting radical views and joining militant groups?
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 29, 1991, the Supreme Soviet, the parliament of the U.S.S.R., suspended all activities of the Communist Party, bringing an end to the institution.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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Today's Headlines: Obama Weighing Delay in Action on Immigration
Today's Headlines Saturday, August 30, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Travel | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Obama Weighing Delay in Action on Immigration
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR
The president is said to be considering a delay until after the elections in November, mindful of the electoral peril for Democratic Senate candidates.
Video: One Family Faces the Immigration Debate



Praising Rebels, Putin Toughens Tone on Ukraine
By NEIL MacFARQUHAR and ANDREW E. KRAMER
As separatists seized a strategically located town in southeast Ukraine, President Vladimir V. Putin issued a congratulatory message to the insurgents.

Divisions Grow as a Downturn Rocks Europe
By LIZ ALDERMAN and ALISON SMALE
Leaders are battling a raft of problems, including deflation and unemployment, and many are increasingly taking issue with Germany's austerity mantra.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

N.Y. / REGION
A New Yorker Faces His Phobia, One Stroke at a Time
By N. R. KLEINFIELD
Traumatized by childhood incidents, Attis Clopton was deathly afraid of water, so he attacked his phobia by enrolling in a program of swimming lessons.
Video: A Liquid Fear



OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
To Defeat Terror, We Need the World's Help
By JOHN KERRY
No civilized country can shirk its responsibility to fight a global scourge.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"She still has her bedroom. She slept there last night and will sleep there again tonight."
MOON LANDRIEU, the father of Senator Mary L. Landrieu, Democrat of Louisiana, who is accused of using her parents' home address to establish her residency in the state for her embattled re-election campaign.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Unlikely Neighbors
In New York's mixed-income buildings, market-rate tenants live right next door to low-income tenants.
Related Article



VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Fall Transition
As summer fades, women are adjusting to autumn with a deeper palette, from fir-tree greens to burgundies, charcoal and black.
Related Article



VIDEO: 2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
The family-friendly, wildnerness-friendly Subaru Outback continues down the same path with upgraded gear.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Iraqi Kurds Expand Autonomy as ISIS Reorders the Landscape
By HELENE COOPER and MICHAEL R. GORDON
The ISIS invasion has physically cut off most of Kurdistan from the rest of Shiite-dominated Iraq and encouraged the Iraqi Kurds in their drive for expanded autonomy.

Leadership and Calm Are Urged in Ebola Outbreak
By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.
Leadership and help from Western nations are needed to eradicate the virus in West Africa, said pioneers in the fights against smallpox, polio and other diseases.

China's Antigraft Campaign Expands to a Coal-Rich Northern Province
By CHRIS BUCKLEY
Efforts to purge corruption from the Communist Party have reached Shanxi, a province of northern China abundant in coal and opportunities for crooked deals.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Judge Rejects Texas Stricture on Abortions
By ERIK ECKHOLM and MANNY FERNANDEZ
A federal judge in Austin, Tex., blocked a stringent new rule on Friday that would have forced more than half of the state's remaining abortion clinics to close.
Document: Ruling Strikes Down Restrictive Texas Abortion Law



Swirls of Dust and Drama, Punctuating Life in the Southwest
By FERNANDA SANTOS
Children, drivers and other residents have learned how to prepare for huge dust storms, sometimes called haboobs, that can turn day into night in seconds.

Federal Judge Approves California Plan to Reduce Isolation of Mentally Ill Inmates
By ERICA GOODE
The state, adhering to a court order, is proposing to stop keeping most mentally ill prisoners in their windowless cells for 23 hours a day.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

As Virginia Trial Ends, Jury Is Asked to Decide if Ex-Governor Was Corrupt, or Hapless Husband
By TRIP GABRIEL
Prosecutors warned jurors not to accept defense arguments that former Gov. Bob McDonnell was unfairly targeted by law enforcement.


Seeking to Ease Worries, Obama Says the World Has Always Been 'Messy'
By PETER BAKER
The president finds himself trying to buck up supporters heading into a crucial midterm election season.


Residency Questions Roil Senate Race in Louisiana
By DAVID S. JOACHIM and JONATHAN WEISMAN
The re-election campaign of Senator Mary L. Landrieu, a Democrat, was in defensive mode after a report that she is registered to vote at her parents' home in New Orleans but lists Washington as her home in regulatory filings.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

BusinessMedicare Will Settle Short-Term Care Bills
By REED ABELSON
Under the proposed settlement, hospital claims involving inpatient stays that are now under appeal would be paid at the rate of 68 cents for every dollar billed.

Vice Media Stakes Future on A&E Networks Deal
By JONATHAN MAHLER
A&E Networks will invest $250 million in Vice Media and receive a 10 percent stake in the company.


DEALBOOK
To Compete Against Alibaba, Wanda Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent
By NEIL GOUGH
Dalian Wanda, the Chinese conglomerate controlled by the billionaire Wang Jianlin, announced it would enter the e-commerce industry in an $800 million partnership with two of China's biggest Internet companies.
DealBook: After Loss of Alibaba I.P.O., Hong Kong Weighs Changes to Its Listing Rules


For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology
BITS BLOG
Lyft Says Uber's Recruitment Efforts Are Hurting Drivers
By NICK BILTON
In instances when Uber ambassadors take rides to recruit Lyft drivers, those Lyft drivers experience a considerable drop in pay, according to company data.
DealBook: To Compete Against Alibaba, Wanda Joins Forces With Baidu and Tencent



BITS DIGITAL DIARY
On Instagram's Hyperlapse, and Fast-Forwarding to the Future
By JENNA WORTHAM
Instagram's new tool for capturing time-lapse video could provide a new prism through which people view and present themselves to the world.


Chief Executive of Rovio, Maker of Angry Birds Game, to Step Down
By MARK SCOTT
The move by Mikael Hed comes as the Finnish company struggles to respond to an increasing trend toward so-called freemium games.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
Feast of Season Openers Worthy of Top Billing
By MARC TRACY
More and more top-25 teams are facing off in the first couple weeks of the college football season, partly because of the influence of television and the new four-team playoff.

Saturday's College Football Games to Watch
By FRED BIERMAN
No. 14 Wisconsin vs. No. 13 Louisiana State highlights this Saturday's schedule.


SPORTS OF THE TIMES
Here Comes September. There Lie the Mets.
By MICHAEL POWELL
There has been a metronomic regularity to this annual Mets ruination: glimmers of hope in the spring, a nice little run in June or July, then total and profound collapse.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
Green Acres, the Place to Be
By PATRICIA LEIGH BROWN
"Behold! New Lebanon," a tourism project in a struggling Hudson Valley town, is part of a movement that some are calling "rural by choice."


Movies Have Worst Summer Since 1997
By BROOKS BARNES
Potential film ticket buyers stayed away from theaters this summer as similar fare failed to ignite excitement.


Film Fests for a Few (Oddballs Especially)
By SAM ROBERTS
Beyond mainstream film festivals, screenings aimed at more eclectic audiences seem to be proliferating.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region
Handshakes and Hugs, Hallmarks of the Stump, Are Rare With Cuomo
By THOMAS KAPLAN
While some politicians feed off handshakes, hugs and high-fives, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo seems to avoid them.


At Gateway to Hamptons, Ku Klux Klan Advertises for New Members
By AL BAKER
This summer, pamphlets and a recruitment form have been stuffed into plastic sandwich bags, along with a few Jolly Ranchers, and tossed onto driveways in Hampton Bays.


Pre-K Clash May Hint at the Start of a Rivalry Between de Blasio and Stringer
By KATE TAYLOR
This week, Comptroller Scott M. Stringer criticized the city's rollout of prekindergarten expansion, eliciting an unusually strong response from Mayor Bill de Blasio.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Travel
1,000 Islands, 2 Worlds
By ALAN FEUER
In the Maldives, escapist resorts coexist with the country's strict Islamic government.


UPDATE
In Las Vegas, Gun Ranges Are Tourist Draws
By KIMBERLEY McGEE
An accidental shooting in Arizona has put a spotlight on gun tourism.


FOOTSTEPS
Freud's City, From Couch to Cafes
By STEPHEN HEYMAN
Visiting Vienna, Freud's longtime home, 75 years after his death.

For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »

Obituaries
Ahmed Seif, Who Was Tortured in Egypt and Became Rights Defender, Dies at 63
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Mr. Seif, a leading human rights lawyer, defended leftists, Islamists, atheists and gays.


Jack Kraft, Villanova Basketball Coach, Dies at 93
By RICHARD GOLDSTEIN
Kraft, who spent 12 seasons as the Wildcats' head coach, took them to the N.C.A.A. tournament six times.

For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

EditorialsTODAY'S EDITORIALS
Yes to Housing in Our Backyards
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Mayor de Blasio's mission to fix the city's affordable-housing problem is daunting and necessary.
Pakistan, Its Own Worst Enemy

Choices for the Legislature and the Civil Court


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed
OP-ED CONTRIBUTORS
Stop Dithering, Confront ISIS
By JOHN MCCAIN and LINDSEY GRAHAM
No one is advocating an invasion, but we need a military strategy, and a far greater sense of urgency.


OP-ED COLUMNIST
Imagining Successful Schools
By JOE NOCERA
One of the grand old men of education policy says test-based accountability has got to go.
Columnist Page



OP-ED | TIMOTHY EGAN
New West Renaissance
By TIMOTHY EGAN
Welcome to an ecosystem where the urban and the wild depend on each other.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAYOn Aug. 30, 1963, the hot-line communications link between Washington, D.C., and Moscow went into operation.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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Access The New York Times from anywhere with our suite of apps:
iPhone® | iPad® | Android | All

Save 15% at The NYTimes Store »
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  • 148 days ago via site
  • 116

Today's Headlines Thursday, August 28, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Fashion & Style | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News


Ukraine Reports Russian Invasion on a New Front
By ANDREW E. KRAMER and MICHAEL R. GORDON
Tanks, artillery and infantry have crossed from Russia into an unbreached part of eastern Ukraine in recent days, in what Ukrainian and Western military officials are calling a stealth invasion.


Military Skill and Terrorist Technique Fuel Success of ISIS
By BEN HUBBARD and ERIC SCHMITT
As fighters continue to seize territory, ISIS has built an effective management structure of mostly middle-aged Iraqis, including many military officers under Saddam Hussein.
Lawmakers Want Congress to Decide on Military Action Against ISIS




REMAKING MEDICINE
Expansion of Mental Health Care Hits Obstacles
By ABBY GOODNOUGH
The Affordable Care Act has paved the way for one of the largest expansion of mental health coverage in a generation, increasing access for millions.
Share Your Experience With the Affordable Care Act


For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks


WORLD
VIDEO: A Mother's Personal Appeal to ISIS
Shirley Sotloff's son Steven is being held by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. In a video obtained by The New York Times, she spoke directly to the group's leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.
Related Article




OPINION | ROOM FOR DEBATE
Holding Bankers Accountable
Can more be done to hold bankers accountable for the financial crisis or is there a good reason the Justice Department has reached settlements without prosecuting individuals?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"There was some resistance to awarding a Union soldier the congressional medal at Gettysburg even 150 years after the fact. They didn't want us refighting the Civil War all over again. It's still sensitive."
RON KIND, Democrat of Wisconsin, a lawmaker who co-sponsored legislation to allow Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing to receive a Medal of Honor for his heroism at Gettysburg. Some Southern lawmakers were hesitant.


Today's Video


VIDEO: Inside U.S. Hostage Policy
A look at some very rare exceptions in the United States's otherwise strict policy of never negotiating with hostage-takers.
Related Article




VIDEO: Behind the Blackwater Trial
A look at why the case of four Blackwater guards, accused of murdering 17 Iraqis in Nisour Square on Sept. 16, 2007, has taken so long to reach the courtroom.
Related Article




VIDEO: Dubbing 007
German actor Dietmar Wunder performs the voice of Daniel Craig as James Bond, among many others, as a dubbing artist in Berlin.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World


As Truce Holds, Dazed Gazans Get to Work
By JODI RUDOREN and FARES AKRAM
Palestinian workers began clearing rubble and repairing damage from Israeli attacks as residents returned home, but some residents of southern Israel remained wary of the cease-fire.


Skirmishes Put Feeling of Wartime on India-Pakistan Border
By ELLEN BARRY and SALMAN MASOOD
It is unclear what has caused the rise in nightly artillery firing across the border, which intensified in mid-August and reportedly has killed two Indian civilians and four Pakistani civilians.
Proposing New Capital Is Old Idea in Argentina
By SIMON ROMERO
President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner's suggestion to consider making Santiago del Estero the nation's capital reflects longstanding tension between Buenos Aires and Argentina's provinces.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.


A 9-Year-Old at a Shooting Range, a Spraying Uzi and Outrage
By KIMBERLEY McGEE and FERNANDA SANTOS
After a girl from New Jersey accidentally killed her instructor at a shooting range in Arizona, her parents' cellphone video caused a worldwide spectacle.
Motherlode: U.S. Kids, Learning to Aim and Fire




Medal of Honor for a Civil War Hero 150 Years in the Grave
By PETER BAKER
More than 150 years after standing his ground against Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg, Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing will be posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor by President Obama.
Document: Times Machine: Coverage from the Day of Pickett's Charge

Interactive: From Opinion: Disunion: The Civil War




CHICAGO JOURNAL
Little League Win Lifts District Marred by Violence
By GREG COUCH
Chicago welcomed back the Jackie Robinson West Little League team, starting with a homey neighborhood celebration in the South Side, a departure for an area known for gun violence.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics


Immigration Clash Could Lead to Shutdown
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
President Obama is believed to be preparing to take executive action on immigration, and Republicans are considering removing funding to effectively block the order, possibly prompting a spending stalemate just before November elections.


Unflattering Portrait of Virginia's Former First Lady Is Offered by Her Lawyers
By TRIP GABRIEL
Maureen McDonnell was described by a daughter as a heavy spender, prone to outbursts of anger who seemed infatuated with a rich businessman.
Black Ex-Police Chief Picked for Top Enforcement Post in Missouri
By JOHN ELIGON
Gov. Jay Nixon on Wednesday nominated a former St. Louis police chief to become the state's top law enforcement official - and the only African-American in his cabinet - in the wake of racially charged unrest in Ferguson.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business


JPMorgan and Other Banks Struck by Cyberattack
By NICOLE PERLROTH
The hackers stole gigabytes of data, including account information. It is not yet clear if the attacks were financially motivated or part of a cyberespionage campaign.


DEALBOOK
Lending Club, Middleman for Small Loans, Plans a Stock Offering
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
Lending Club, which has political heavyweights on its board and has raised money from the likes of Google, could rank among the 10 biggest initial public offerings of an Internet company.


DEALBOOK
Mobile Sales Lift Alibaba Profit Nearly Threefold, Ahead of I.P.O.
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
As it prepares for an initial public offering in mid-September, the Chinese e-commerce company reported a staggering $2 billion of profit on $2.5 billion in revenue for its most recent quarter.
Documents: Alibaba's Pre-I.P.O. Filings


For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology


THE UPSHOT
Uber's Secret Agents: When Poaching Becomes Unethical
By NEIL IRWIN
How the smartphone-based car service tried to lure drivers from its main competitor.


BITS BLOG
Looking to the Future of Data Science
By STEVE LOHR
The future of data science lies beyond the big-data focus on predictions and recommendations, according to Oren Etzioni, a leading computer scientist.


STATE OF THE ART
The Future Could Work, if We Let It
By FARHAD MANJOO
A book offers an optimistic view of the effects of technology, but its arguments have one big blind spot: human behavior.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports


A Prodigy Calmly Jolts Her Sport
By JOHN BRANCH
Those who know CiCi Bellis, the 15-year-old who defeated 12th-seeded Dominika Cibulkova in the first round on Tuesday, say her burst onto the scene is not surprising given her maturity.
For Up-Close View of CiCi Bellis, Just Be Patient


For Up-Close View of CiCi Bellis, Just Be Patient
By NAILA-JEAN MEYERS
Want to jump on the Bellis bandwagon at the United States Open? Seats are first-come, first-serve, so bring sunscreen and be prepared to wait.


SPORTS OF THE TIMES
Aching for Change in an Unequal Sport
By JULIET MACUR
Five-set matches take an unnecessary toll on the bodies of male tennis players at Grand Slams, and they also perpetuate inequality between the men and the women.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts


MUSIC REVIEW
Duelists Armed With Banter and Mutual Admiration
By JON CARAMANICA
The hip-hop stars Drake and Lil Wayne are on tour this summer trading off sets and playing off each other.


MUSIC REVIEW
Vision Undimmed by Decades
By BEN RATLIFF
The singer Kate Bush returned to the London stage Tuesday for the first of 22 performances of a spectacle called "Before the Dawn," her vision as wide and soaring as ever.


Everyone Loves a Loner
By MICHAEL CIEPLY
"Wild" and "Tracks" are among several recent films that explore the challenges of human isolation.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region


Student-Built Apps Teach Colleges a Thing or Two
By ARIEL KAMINER
Undergraduates are producing faster, easier and more informative versions of campus information systems like course catalogs and class scheduling.
Heroin's Death Toll Rising in New York, Amid a Shift in Who Uses It
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
In all, 420 people in New York City fatally overdosed on heroin in 2013 out of a total of 782 drug overdoses, rising to a level not seen in a decade.


A Crime Where the Telltale Clue Is a Corn Tassel
By ALISON LEIGH COWAN
Thieves have struck two farms in Connecticut, taking more than $1,200 worth of produce and leaving farmers to debate ways to better safeguard their crops.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Fashion & Style


The Crazy Quilt of Fall
By RUTH LA FERLA
Ushering in the new fall season with an eye-popping tapestry of textures, shapes and layers, reflecting the increasingly global worldview of designer and consumer alike.
Slide Show: Fashion Trends to Court This Fall




A Parting of the Ways at Visionaire
By JACOB BERNSTEIN
After more than 20 years, the founders of a groundbreaking art magazine decide to split.


DISRUPTIONS
Ferguson Reveals a Twitter Loop
By NICK BILTON
Twitter ensured that the events in Ferguson, Mo., led to a debate about police violence and race in America. But it was also responsible for creating and perpetuating numerous falsehoods.
For more fashion news, go to NYTimes.com/Fashion »

Obituaries


Helen Bamber, Therapist to Torture Victims, Dies at 89
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Ms. Bamber's method involved revisiting victims' worst horrors and letting her clients work them out.
Elizabeth M. Fowler, Financial Reporter for The Times, Dies at 95
By PAUL VITELLO
Ms. Fowler was one of the first women to cover Wall Street for a daily newspaper.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Questions on Airstrikes in Syria
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
President Obama is considering expanding military action into Syria, but there are too many unknowns to make that decision now.
A Better Deal for Franchisees and Workers

Timothy Wu for Lieutenant Governor


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed


OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
The Poisoning of Africa's Vultures
By DARCY L. OGADA
The circling scavengers are the poachers' worst enemy.


OP-ED COLUMNIST
Bill O'Reilly and White Privilege
By CHARLES M. BLOW
We can't expect equality of outcome while at the same time acknowledging inequality of environments.
Columnist Page




OP-ED COLUMNIST
Is Everyone a Little Bit Racist?
By NICHOLAS KRISTOF
Recent events in Ferguson, Mo., have America talking about race. The conversation should include our unconscious attitudes that result in discriminatory policies and behavior.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
In 1963, 200,000 people participated in a peaceful civil rights rally in Washington, D.C., where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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  • 148 days ago via site
  • 93

N.Y. Today: Bronx Caregiver Is Charged With Manslaughter in the Death of a Toddler; 5 People, Including 3 Children, Are Killed in Long Island Crash-NYT-PALMERA777-PAPYRO#4-31-08-14-1-2-3
Monday, August 25, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Welcome, Birds

Good morning on this sunny Monday.
Birders in New York City are celebrating the return of the raven after more than a century, The Times reports.
But ravens are just one of many birds whose fortunes and visibility are on the rise.
Some are turning up because of cleaner waterways and better habitat management.
Others have arrived on the wings of climate change.
Here are a few birds and their stories:
• Common Tern: This shorebird with a black cap and a deeply forked tail is threatened in New York State, in part because of disturbances on its breeding grounds.
More of the day's news »



News

Bronx Caregiver Is Charged With Manslaughter in the Death of a Toddler
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
Athena Skeeter, a licensed child care worker, is facing charges in the death of 19-month-old Cardell Williamson, who was found unresponsive in her home.

5 People, Including 3 Children, Are Killed in Long Island Crash
By BENJAMIN MUELLER
The New York State Police said a car carrying five members of a family returning to Brooklyn veered off the Southern State Parkway, struck a tree and burst into flames.

Cuomo Opponent Unbowed by Underdog Status
By DAVID W. CHEN
She has little name recognition and fewer campaign funds, but Zephyr Teachout, a Fordham law professor, is relishing her run against Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo in the Democratic primary.

A Slimmed-Down Al Sharpton Savors an Expanded Profile
By NIKITA STEWART and JASON HOROWITZ
From an overweight Brooklyn firebrand clad in track suits and draped in medallions, the Rev. Al Sharpton has transformed himself into the White House's civil rights leader of choice.

ADVERTISEMENT






Features

Saving Scraps From the Past Amid New Haven's Revitalization
By ALISON LEIGH COWAN
An amateur historian springs into action when crews are ready to dig in a spot that might contain traces of the Connecticut city's past, pleading for a chance to retrieve objects.

Sports

Weary of Pro Tennis Delays? Cry Into the Towel
By HARVEY ARATON
For various reasons, sometimes including actually drying off, players have increasingly been going to the towel. Beyond noticeable, it has made some people irritable.

Trophy Case Door Is Ajar
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
With Rafael Nadal at home, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray unsettled and Roger Federer now 33, this could be the right time for a major breakthrough.

YANKEES 7, WHITE SOX 4, 10 INNINGS
McCann's Dramatic Homer Is Welcome Sight for Yankees
By DAVID WALDSTEIN
The Yankees rallied at the right times on Sunday, with key hits from Ichiro Suzuki and Brian McCann, to complete a three-game sweep of the White Sox.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

ADVERTISEMENT


Multimedia
PHOTOGRAPHS: New York Panorama
Every Sunday in the Metropolitan section, a photographer offers a new slice of New York.

Arts

MUSIC REVIEW
These Hand-Me-Downs Still Shine Like New
By NATE CHINEN
The imprimatur of elders was a theme running clearly through the Charlie Parker Jazz Festival in Harlem, no matter the age of the performers.

MUSIC REVIEW
Festival Rests on Requiem
By ZACHARY WOOLFE
Mostly Mozart ends on notes of a Requiem and a Frank Martin violin concerto.

MUSIC REVIEW
Letting a Sonata Take Charge of Its Space
By ANTHONY TOMMASINI
The violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja performed selections by Bach and Bartok in closing the A Little Night Music series on Thursday.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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Today's Headlines: Obama Approves Air Surveillance of ISIS in Syria
Today's Headlines Tuesday, August 26, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Science | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News
Obama Approves Air Surveillance of ISIS in Syria
By MARK LANDLER and HELENE COOPER
The flights would be a precursor to broader airstrikes against ISIS militants, which are already taking place in Iraq.

Arab Nations Strike in Libya, Surprising U.S.
By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK and ERIC SCHMITT
The airstrikes against Islamist-allied militias were a major escalation by the bloc of nations seeking to roll back Islamist gains since the Arab Spring.

Amid Mourning for Michael Brown, Call for Change
By MONICA DAVEY
Speakers at the service, addressing an overflowing crowd, exhorted mourners to work for justice not just for Mr. Brown but for others.
Michael Brown's Last Weeks

Photographs: Outcry and Confrontation in Ferguson


For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

ARTS
Emmys 2014: 'Breaking Bad' and 'Modern Family' Take Top Honors
By EMILY STEEL
The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles included expected wins for "Breaking Bad" and yet another top comedy honor for "Modern Family."
ArtsBeat: Highlights From the Show



OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
How to Get Kids to Class
By DANIEL J. CARDINALI
Poor students don't just need teachers. They need social workers.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"No one is going to talk openly and say, 'Oh, we're not making low-income students a priority.' But enrollment management is so sophisticated that they know pretty clearly how much each student would cost."
MICHAEL N. BASTEDO, of the University of Michigan, on a lack of economic diversity at selective colleges.


Today's Video

VIDEO: ScienceTake | The Frog Slap Shot
The fearsome Pac-Man frog has a huge mouth and a really sticky tongue.
Related Article



VIDEO: In Performance | Kelvin Moon Loh
Kelvin Moon Loh sings "God Draws Straight" from "Here Lies Love," a musical about the life of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos. The show, conceived by David Byrne, is at the Public Theater.
Related Review



VIDEO: Fruit Galette
Melissa Clark shows you how to sweeten and thicken any type of fruit for a go-to galette.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

French Cabinet Is Dissolved, a Victim of Austerity Battles
By DAN BILEFSKY and LIZ ALDERMAN
Manuel Valls announced plans to dissolve the government after a rancorous battle in his cabinet over the direction of the economy.

As Peace Talks Approach, Rebels Humiliate Prisoners in Ukraine
By ANDREW E. KRAMER and ANDREW ROTH
Ahead of peace talks on Tuesday between presidents of Russia and Ukraine, a woman accused of spying was abused in dramatic fashion along a busy street in Donetsk.

Ex-Diplomat for the Vatican Could Be Tried
By LAURIE GOODSTEIN
The former ambassador to the Dominican Republic is accused of paying boys there to engage in sexual acts, and his diplomatic immunity has been revoked.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Generation Later, Poor Are Still Rare at Elite Colleges
By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA
Surveys of top colleges found virtually no change from the 1990s to 2012 in enrollment of students who are less well off despite a huge increase in the number of such students going to college.

Grain Piles Up, Waiting for a Ride, as Trains Move North Dakota Oil
By RON NIXON
Energy exploration in North Dakota is creating a crisis for farmers whose grain shipments have been held up by a vast new movement of oil by rail.

Napa Mops Up Wine and Tallies Its Losses After Quake
By CONOR DOUGHERTY, IAN LOVETT and ADAM NAGOURNEY
The Napa Valley quake wreaked havoc with California wineries, but as they assessed the damage, there were signs the impact may not have been as bad as it first appeared.
Losses From California Quake Could Top $1 Billion


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Politics

Election Panel Enacts Policies by Not Acting
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Deadlocked votes by the Federal Election Commission have created a rapidly expanding universe of unofficial law, particularly on financial disclosure and investigations.

Virginia's Ex-Governor Pushes Back in Testy Exchange With Prosecutors
By JONATHAN WEISMAN
Prosecutors took aim at the defense's claim that Bob McDonnell, the former governor of Virginia, knew little about the lavish gifts from a supporter.

Technology Adviser Expected to Leave White House Post
By DAVID S. JOACHIM
Todd Park, who was hired to fix the HealthCare.gov website after problems with its introduction, is said to be returning to Silicon Valley.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

What's Twitch? Gamers Know, and Amazon Is Spending $1 Billion on It
By NICK WINGFIELD
Twitch, a hugely popular streaming video service, has helped turn gaming into a spectator event as much as a participatory activity.

DEALBOOK
Courting Tim Hortons, Burger King Has Plans for a Fast-Food Empire
By DAVID GELLES and IAN AUSTEN
Burger King will spend more than $8 billion on the Canadian chain of coffee-and-doughnut shops. But putting multiple fast-food brands under one roof could be a risky strategy.
DealBook: Burger King in Talks to Buy Tim Hortons and Move to Canada



Future of Export-Import Bank Is Wild Card in Key Senate Races
By CARL HULSE
The reauthorization of the agency that offers loans to foreign buyers of American products has become a source of friction in high-profile campaigns.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology
In India, an App for Chats and for Keeping Secrets
By SARITHA RAI
The Hike instant messaging system lets users filter information to cloak aspects of their social lives from their parents.

BITS BLOG
California Governor Signs Law Requiring a 'Kill Switch' on Smartphones
By BRIAN X. CHEN
The law requires smartphones sold in California to include antitheft technology, a feature that lawmakers hope will lead to a cool down in phone theft, now the hottest urban crime.

BITS BLOG
Judge Rejects Settlement Proposal in HP's Autonomy Suit
By QUENTIN HARDY
On Monday, a judge ruled out a deal that would have given the lawyers suing Hewlett-Packard over its Autonomy deal perhaps $66 million while ordering changes in corporate governance.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

SPORTS OF THE TIMES
An Opening Day of Distraction
By JULIET MACUR
For Venus Williams, there's not much joking on the court these days. And even as the U.S. Open crowd broke out in giggles when a bee disturbed her match, Williams stood stonefaced waiting to return a serve.

Maria Sharapova Routs Ex-Doubles Partner at U.S. Open
By ZACH SCHONBRUN
Sharapova trailed Maria Kirilenko, whom she has known since they were 12, 4-2 in the first set, but she won the next 10 games to advance with ease, 6-4, 6-0.

First Session at U.S. Open Presents Challenges for Seeded Players
By LYNN ZINSER
Andy Murray survived severe cramping to win, Simona Halep needed three sets to advance and Venus Williams overcame errors and a pesky bee, but No. 21 Mikhail Youzhny was upset by Nick Kyrgios.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

FASHION REVIEW
TV's Red Carpet Style, All Dressed Up in Cinema's Glamour
By ALEXANDRA JACOBS
There were no trends on the Emmys red carpet; there was only trending.

THEATER REVIEW | 'AND I AND SILENCE'
Bonding Behind Bars
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
In the play "And I and Silence," two prisoners form a bond while contemplating a future on the outside.

BOOKS OF THE TIMES
Murder Clues in Teenage Slang
By JANET MASLIN
"The Secret Place" is the latest in Tana French's Irish detective series.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

Uncertainty for Workers Losing Jobs at Atlantic City Casinos
By PATRICK McGEEHAN
The city is bracing for an economic blow as three of casinos - Showboat, Revel and Trump Plaza - shut down in the next three weeks. About 6,500 workers will be laid off.

A Knock on the Door, a Stranger, Then a Killing at a Rural Summer Home
By MARC SANTORA
A robbery in western New York last week turned bloody, the authorities said, resulting in a woman's death, and the arrests of two men.

THE APPRAISAL
Trailer Park on Atlantic Appeals to the Rich
By MATT A.V. CHABAN
Tiny plots on the East End of Long Island, sold mostly to blue-collar workers for $10,000 each in the 1970s, are being bought up by lawyers and socialites, at prices closer to $1 million.
More Appraisal Columns


For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Science

AIDS Progress in South Africa in Peril
By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.
Though few Americans realize it, South Africa owes much of its success in the fight against AIDS to a single United States program - one that is now moving elsewhere.
Three Approaches to Beating the AIDS Epidemic in South Africa



Modern Research Borne on a Relic
By JOSHUA A. KRISCH
Engineers are designing sleek new airships that could streak past layers of cloud and carry telescopes into the thin, icy air of the stratosphere.

Moving Back Home Together
By NATE SCHWEBER
A growing number of younger Native Americans are helping to restore native animals to the Northern Great Plains, providing new homes for the animals and a connection to the past.
For more science news, go to NYTimes.com/Science »

Obituaries

John G. Sperling, For-Profit College Pioneer, Dies at 93
By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA
Mr. Sperling founded a multibillion-dollar enterprise in the University of Phoenix, and became "an unintentional entrepreneur and an accidental C.E.O."

Frans Brüggen, Pioneer in Early Music, Dies at 79
By VIVIEN SCHWEITZER
Mr. Brüggen, who began his career as a recorder soloist, was a founder of the Orchestra of the 18th Century.

Sam Hunter, Curator and Museum Founder, Dies at 91
By ROBERTA SMITH
Mr. Hunter was founding curator of the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis and a prolific writer specializing in 20th-century art.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
When Five-Star Care Is Substandard
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Medicare's rating system masks serious and potentially dangerous deficiencies at many nursing homes.
Afghanistan's Moment of Reckoning

Deported From the Middle of Nowhere


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Lost in America
By FRANK BRUNI
We've gone from gumption to gloom, with political implications that are impossible to foretell.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Making of a Disaster
By ROGER COHEN
A long list of American missteps paved the way to ISIS.
Columnist Page



OP-DOCS
'A Marriage to Remember'
By BANKER WHITE
In this short documentary, a filmmaker explores how Alzheimer's disease has revealed the strength of his parents' marriage.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing women the right to vote, was declared in effect.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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N.Y. Today: Uncertainty For Workers Losing Jobs At Casinos; Murder at a Rural Summer Home
Tuesday, August 26, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Improv, With Filters

Good morning on this soon-to-be hot Tuesday.
Improv is supposed to be spontaneous.
But one troupe in the city can't, by house rules, just blurt out the first thing that comes to mind. Instead, it practices self-censorship, which in itself is an amusing paradox.
The troupe, Cherub Improv, started seven years ago in New York as a community service endeavor, and performs in senior and veterans' homes, at rehabilitation centers, for youth programs and before religious groups.
Each audience has a different set of no-nos, usually prescribed by the event coordinator. Shows for cancer patients should avoid references to illness and dying. Shows for veterans should not include quips about addiction.
"We train ourselves to have a filter," said Jonathan Goldberg, president and co-founder of Cherub.
But some groups practically beg for the off-color material. "We've gotten some racy suggestions at senior shows and sometimes we'll run with it," he said.
More of the day's news »



News

Uncertainty for Workers Losing Jobs at Atlantic City Casinos
By PATRICK McGEEHAN
The city is bracing for an economic blow as three of its casinos - Showboat, Revel and Trump Plaza - shut down in the next three weeks. About 6,500 workers will be laid off.

A Knock on the Door, a Stranger, Then a Killing at a Rural Summer Home
By MARC SANTORA
A robbery in western New York last week turned bloody, the authorities said, resulting in a woman's death, and the arrests of two men.

Tourist Is Held After Climb on Brooklyn Bridge Cable
By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.
The walk to a bridge tower, made by a Russian tourist whom the police called a thrill-seeker, again highlighted security problems at the crossing.

Woman Dies After Fall From Greenwich Village Roof Deck
By TATIANA SCHLOSSBERG
Cindy Yeh, a 23-year-old intern at the Museum of Modern Art, fell while she was dancing at a party on Sullivan Street.

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Features

350 Years Ago, New Amsterdam Became New York. Don't Expect a Party.
By SAM ROBERTS
No celebration is planned for Tuesday to honor the 350th anniversary of when a settlement known as New Amsterdam became New York in a bloodless regime change.

Sheep Are Given Room to Roam, and in Return, They Manage the Land
By KATHRYN SHATTUCK
A partnership between a nonprofit farm and the Rockefeller State Park Preserve in Westchester County uses privately owned ewes to mow and maintain publicly managed land.

Columnist

THE APPRAISAL
Trailer Park on Atlantic Appeals to the Rich
By MATT A.V. CHABAN
Tiny plots on the East End of Long Island, sold mostly to blue-collar workers for $10,000 each in the 1970s, are being bought up by lawyers and socialites, at prices closer to $1 million.
More Appraisal Columns



Sports

YANKEES 8, ROYALS 1
Yankees Keep Firing on All Cylinders in Fifth Straight Win
By DAVID WALDSTEIN
Pitching and hitting both held up for the Yankees as they defeated the Royals and attempted to claw back into the playoff picture.

First Session at U.S. Open Presents Challenges for Seeded Players
By LYNN ZINSER
Andy Murray survived severe cramping to win, Simona Halep needed three sets to advance and Venus Williams overcame errors and a pesky bee, but No. 21 Mikhail Youzhny was upset by Nick Kyrgios.
Jets Suspend Cornerback Amid Inquiry Into Absence
By TOM PEDULLA
General Manager John Idzik, who signed Dimitri Patterson with the expectation that he would start at cornerback, announced on Monday that the player had been suspended indefinitely.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

ADVERTISEMENT


Multimedia

HUNGRY CITY | THE DOGWOOD
All That's Southern, and Ribs for Fred Flintstone
By LIGAYA MISHAN
At the Dogwood in Prospect Park South, Brooklyn, the cooking of North Carolina creates a place that is at once a neighborhood spot and a patch of elsewhere.

Arts

Emmys 2014: 'Breaking Bad' and 'Modern Family' Take Top Honors
By EMILY STEEL
The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles included expected wins for the final season of "Breaking Bad" and yet another top comedy honor for "Modern Family."
ArtsBeat: Highlights From the Show



THEATER REVIEW | 'AND I AND SILENCE'
Bonding Behind Bars
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
In the play "And I and Silence," two prisoners form a bond while contemplating a future on the outside.

THEATER REVIEW | 'THE LAST DAYS OF CLEOPATRA'
Mother's Death Tests a Family's Ties
By ANDY WEBSTER
In "The Last Days of Cleopatra," a matriarch's death serves as an opening for a family to face all kinds of personal issues.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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  • 148 days ago via site
  • 110

James Rodríguez

Colombiano, jugador del Real Madrid C. F. y Selección Colombia,...
Following: 250 • Followers: 4873615

Titulares del día Lunes, 1 de septiembre 2014

http://www.lavanguardia.com/newsletter/index.html?nwlKey=nwl_lv_titulares
Un barco ucraniano, atacado desde la costa con artillería
Los separatistas pro-rusos reivindican el ataque | Los rebeldes dicen que el gobierno sufre su "primera derrota naval"
Putin aboga por crear un estado al este de Ucrania para poner fin al conflicto
El dirigente ruso ha reprochado a la UE su apoyo a Kiev y pide a Bruselas que "se lo piensen
Kiev libera a los diez soldados rusos apresados en territorio ucraniano
"Las negociaciones no fueron nada fáciles. Con todo, reinó el sentido común y todo terminó bien", aseguró un portavoz ucraniano
La UE se plantea endurecer las sanciones contra Rusia
Hollande considera que es la respuesta justa al agravamiento de la situación en Ucrania | Barroso también prevé medidas que, apuntó, "no son un fin en sí mismo

Hello Obramaury,

WHEW. It's been a minute, hasn't it. We've had a bit of a "Batten Down the Hatches" August of grant-writing, which is finally done. That means that we can get back to the hard work of bringing YOU, dear reader, the best music in the entire world.

Take this week's show for instance. "Baaba Maal Acoustic: Live in New York." Where else are you going to hear this Afropop superstar, backed up by his absolutely stellar band, playing a vintage performance? Be sure to read Banning Eyre's list of "5 Essential Tracks" from Baaba's illustrious career.

Also be sure to lend your ears to "Borderless Sounds: The New North Africa," which premiered last week. New music from North Africa doesn't get NEARLY enough attention- so we decided to explore the amazing variety of sounds pouring out of the region. Gnawa Reggae? Rai R'n'B? Berber black metal? We got it all.

On The Blog- The folks over at Tigersmilk Records have a new compilation of Peruvian music from the 60's and 70's. And it's a doozy. Sam interviewed Brazilian baile funk producer Leo Justi about his new mixtape. And we have our first video from our trip to Madagascar.

Finally, a big thank you to everyone who wrote us a testimonial for our grant applications, or gave us a good review on iTunes. We couldn't do it without your help!

-Sam and the Afropop Team
BAABA MAAL ACOUSTIC: LIVE IN NYC
http://www.afropop.org/wp/20069/baaba-maal-acoustic-live-in-nyc/
Produced by Afropop Worldwide • Last aired August 21, 2014
FOUR ESSENTIAL BAABA MAAL TRACKS
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED&V=FQAD_8JWNMG
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=VTX2DZAQIOI&FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED
HTTP://WWW.AFROPOP.ORG/WP/20052/FIVE-ESSENTIAL-BAABA-MAALA-TRACKS/

Posted by Banning Eyre, August 21, 2014
BORDERLESS SOUNDS: THE NEW NORTH AFRICA
http://www.afropop.org/wp/19948/borderless-sounds-the-new-north-africa/
GNAWA REGGAE: A PRIMER
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=PLZA_PFD1B8&FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=GQZFET1FKNQ&FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED&V=KIUB7WABZ4S
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=DUFL5GMQ7EI&FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED
HTTP://WWW.AFROPOP.ORG/WP/18455/GNAWA-REGGAE-A-PRIMER/
Posted by Jesse Brent, August 18, 2014
PERU BRAVO! : A RADICAL DECADE WITH TIGER’S MILK RECORDS
http://www.afropop.org/wp/20002/a-radical-peruvian-decade-with-tigers-milk-records/
HEAVY BAILE: AN INTERVIEW WITH LEO JUSTI
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=FGVIL3CYRWG&FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED
http://www.afropop.org/wp/19703/19703/
AFROPOP’S TOUR OF ‘TANA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=AzAxXZfug1o
http://www.afropop.org/wp/20047/afropops-tour-of-tana/
BERBER METAL AND ACID TAMAZGHA: BLACK SPRING’S CHRISTOPHE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ag0EjGemz_g&feature=player_embedded
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44eiuctx4PQ&feature=player_embedded
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=M9D6FSLCP80&FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED

HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=EZT-XRV0WXS&FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED&V=QUAN47EH4GI
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=MR6GDVPAAC8&FEATURE=PLAYER_EMBEDDED
http://www.afropop.org/wp/19965/berber-metal-acid-tamazgha/


  • 148 days ago via site
  • 89

Today's Headlines: In Washington, Second Thoughts on Arming Police-NYT-PALMERA 777-10-04-2014-4-CERCO SANITARIO-24-08-14-8-9-10-SUSPENSO
Most Popular | Video |


Today's Headlines Sunday, August 24, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Magazine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

In Washington, Second Thoughts on Arming Police
By MATT APUZZO and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
President Obama has ordered a comprehensive review of the government's decade-old strategy of outfitting local police departments with military-grade body armor, officials say.
Graphic: The Flow of Money and Equipment to Local Police

War Gear Flows to Police Departments



If They Survive in the Ebola Ward, They Work On
By ADAM NOSSITER and BEN C. SOLOMON
At the government hospital in Kenema, Sierra Leone, the deputy nurse matron is one of perhaps three women on the original Ebola nursing staff who have neither gotten sick nor fled.
Video: Burial Boys of Ebola



For Nuncio Accused of Abuse, Dominicans Want Justice at Home, Not Abroad
By LAURIE GOODSTEIN
A top Vatican ambassador, or nuncio - who serves as a personal envoy of the pope - was accused of sexual abuse of minors.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S.
Timeline for a Body: 4 Hours in the Middle of a Ferguson Street
By JULIE BOSMAN and JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN
Local officials say the image of Michael Brown's corpse in the open set the scene for what was to become a combustible worldwide story of police tactics and race in America.

OPINION | OPINION
The Climate Swerve
By ROBERT JAY LIFTON
Will a social movement rise up against global warming?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"If I have a long life, I can go back to my people. I can talk to them: 'I'm doing this job for you.' Maybe they can understand me."
KANDEH KAMARA, 21, one of about 20 young men who call themselves "the burial boys," and who do one of the dirtiest jobs in the Ebola crisis: finding and burying corpses across eastern Sierra Leone.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Devoted to Rural America
Patrick Gottsch, founder of the rural cable channel RFD-TV, is taking up the fight against big media mergers.
Related Article



VIDEO: Burial Boys of Ebola
In Sierra Leone, a group of young men take on the dirtiest work of the Ebola outbreak: finding and burying the dead.

VIDEO: Marchers Demand Justice for Eric Garner
Demonstrators on Staten Island protested the chokehold death of an unarmed black man who was in the custody of police officers trying to arrest him for selling loose cigarettes.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

In Afghan Election, Signs of Systemic Fraud Cast Doubt on Many Votes
By CARLOTTA GALL
More than two million ballots in the June 14 presidential runoff have been called into question, foiling a swift democratic transition and plunging the country into crisis.

Populist's Brash Tactics Stir Fears of Crisis in Pakistan
By DECLAN WALSH
Imran Khan, the former cricketer turned opposition leader, led thousands of supporters to the capital a week ago, but his protest movement has been messy and inconclusive.

A Driving School in France Hits a Wall of Regulations
By SUZANNE DALEY
Experts say the struggle of two entrepreneurs highlights how the myriad rules governing driving schools - and 36 other highly regulated professions - stifle competition and inflate prices in France.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Hundreds in Washington Protest Missouri Shooting
By ELENA SCHNEIDER
The demonstrators demanded the arrest of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown and the demilitarization of police departments.
alt=.>On Staten Island, Thousands Protest Police Tactics



Dozens Rally for Officer in Ferguson Killing as Funds Are Raised Online
By FRANCES ROBLES
Supporters of Officer Darren Wilson gathered on Saturday in St. Louis as a campaign to raise money for his relocation and legal expenses surpassed $300,000.

TV Chief Takes 2-by-4 to a Proposed Cable Merger
By EMILY STEEL
Patrick Gottsch, the chairman of the Rural Media Group, has become one of the most vocal critics of the proposed media consolidation.
alt=.> Video: Devoted to Rural America


For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Bid to Expand Medical Marijuana Business Faces Federal Hurdles
By DAVE PHILIPPS
If the federal government agrees, the door could open to interstate sales by medical cannabis growers across the country.

U.S. Court to Hear Case on Voting Restrictions as Arizona Prepares for Polls
By ERIK ECKHOLM
A Denver panel will hear arguments about a policy in Arizona and Kansas that bars some without paper proof of citizenship from voting in state and local elections.
As Arizona Primary Nears, Governor Candidates Turn Eyes to Border



THE UPSHOT
The Growing Blue-State Diaspora
By ROBERT GEBELOFF and DAVID LEONHARDT
Many Americans born in blue states have moved to red states since 2000, helping Democrats in national elections.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Michael Bloomberg's Harder Sell
By LANDON THOMAS Jr.
Stepping up his philanthropy, the former mayor of New York still pushes big ideas, but on a much wider stage. Turkey's smoking rate is just one of his targets.

Raising a Glass to American Upstart Distillers
By CLAY RISEN
With a burst of new flavors and styles, boutique American whiskeys and gins are making a splash in a once-staid global market.

DATAPOINTS
Two Countries, Two Vastly Different Phone Bills
By ANNA BERNASEK
If your monthly cellphone bill seems high, it may be because American cellphone service is among the most costly in the world. A comparison of two phone plans.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

IT'S THE ECONOMY
Delivery Start-Ups Are Back Like It's 1999
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
Silicon Valley wants to save you from ever having to leave your couch. Will it work this time around?
The Upshot: Delivering Everything, Except Perhaps Profits



BITS BLOG
Secret, an Anonymous Social App, Tries to Clean Up Its Act
By MIKE ISAAC
The company announced plans to invest heavily in making the network a more pleasant place to visit.

BITS BLOG
Android Phones Hit by 'Ransomware'
By NICOLE PERLROTH
Hackers have figured out how to lock people out of their Android devices and demand money in exchange for letting them back in.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

B.C.S. Makes Way for College Football Playoff (and New Debates)
By MARC TRACY
A new playoff system this season will include four teams, an increase from the B.C.S.'s two. Most people view that as an improvement, but there is still plenty to argue about.
College Football Playoff Possibilities



A Star's Bumpy Trail to Oregon
By TIM ROHAN
Before Marcus Mariota became the Ducks' quarterback, with a chance at the Heisman Trophy and a national title, he overcame hurdles in Hawaii.

After Season of Despair, All the Pressure Is on the Coach
By MARC TRACY
Will Muschamp, in his fourth season as Florida's coach, is facing enormous pressure to succeed after a 4-8 campaign derailed by more than two dozen injuries.
What to Watch For in the 2014 College Football Season


For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

These Kids Today
By DAVE ITZKOFF
Eighteen years after it was first staged, "This Is Our Youth," Kenneth Lonergan's caustic study of dissolute young adults, reaches Broadway.

MUSIC REVIEW
Papier-Mâché Heads and a Surprise Guest
By NATE CHINEN
In the first of a three-night stand at Barclays Center on Friday, Arcade Fire hit high marks with durable standards, and an arch shrug and wolfish grin toward some critics.

Staying Safe, Exploring Sassy
By JON CARAMANICA
On Ariana Grande's new album, "My Everything," the young pop star strikes a balance between sweet and sultry.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

On Staten Island, Thousands Protest Police Tactics
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
A demonstration on Saturday was, as planned, a peaceful response to the killings of Eric Garner and Michael Brown.
Video: Marchers Demand Justice for Eric Garner



Unions Face Backlash for Joining March on Staten Island
By NIKITA STEWART
New York City labor unions face a backlash from the police union as well as some of their own members for participating in a march protesting the death of a black man in police custody.

A Tale of de Blasio's Neighborhoods: Park Slope and Yorkville
By LIZ ROBBINS
Mayor Bill de Blasio and his family moved to Gracie Mansion from their Brooklyn house, but the Manhattan neighborhood's amenities could mirror the comforts of home.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Magazine

Can U.S. Men's Tennis Rise Again?
By ERIC KONIGSBERG
A new generation of juniors might be able to get America back to the top - if they receive the right push.

Eugenie Bouchard Could Be Tennis's Next Big Shot
By SUSAN DOMINUS
After years grinding on the junior circuit, the 20-year-old is poised to be one of the sport's next big stars. Now she just needs that breakthrough win.

Serena Williams's Secret Weapon
By MICHAEL STEINBERGER
The most important hitting partner in tennis steps out of the shadows.
For more from the Sunday magazine, go to NYTimes.com/Magazine »

Obituaries

John F. Akers, 79, Dies; Led IBM as PCs Ascended
By RICK ROJAS and STEVE LOHR
Mr. Akers became chief executive in 1985, as smaller, less expensive computers started to undercut the company's lucrative mainframe computer business.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Why Interest Rates Need to Stay Low
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
The economy still doesn't have the growth and jobs to justify a rate increase.
The Debate on Salty Foods, Continued

A Better Credit Card


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Black, White and Baseball
By FRANK BRUNI
The man who coached Mo'ne Davis sees the promise of inner-city kids.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Our Thoroughly Modern Enemies
By ROSS DOUTHAT
Why radical Islam isn't just a medieval throwback.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Sunday Review

NEWS ANALYSIS
Dealing With Digital Cruelty
By STEPHANIE ROSENBLOOM
The web encourages bad behavior, and it's part of our nature to focus on the negative. But there are smart ways to respond.

NEWS ANALYSIS
Rethinking Eating
By KATE MURPHY
Start-ups are engineering "meat" and "eggs" from pulverized plant compounds.

ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew smashed into Florida, causing record damage; the storm was blamed for 55 deaths in Florida, Louisiana and the Bahamas.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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N.Y. Today: On Staten Island, Thousands Protest Police Tactics; Unions Face Backlash for Joining March on Staten Island
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Sunday, August 24, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts | Weddings

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

News

On Staten Island, Thousands Protest Police Tactics
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
A demonstration on Saturday was, as planned, a peaceful response to the killings of Eric Garner and Michael Brown.
Video: Marchers Demand Justice for Eric Garner



Unions Face Backlash for Joining March on Staten Island
By NIKITA STEWART
New York City labor unions face a backlash from the police union as well as some of their own members for participating in a march protesting the death of a black man in police custody.

A Tale of de Blasio's Neighborhoods: Park Slope and Yorkville
By LIZ ROBBINS
Mayor Bill de Blasio and his family moved to Gracie Mansion from their Brooklyn house, but the Manhattan neighborhood's amenities could mirror the comforts of home.

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Features

Life After Brooklyn
By MICHELLE HIGGINS
Brooklynites are moving out, fed up with rising rents, bidding wars and neighborhoods that no longer resemble the low-rise bohemian enclaves they found when they arrived.

UPDATE
Time Marches On, Even at Fortress Astoria
By HILARY HOWARD
Living as a family of sorts for 20 years, longtime Queens roommates enter a new era as one man moves out.

Sports

YANKEES 5, WHITE SOX 3
After Joe Torre Is Honored, the Yankees Gain a Win
By ANDREW KEH
Torre became the 18th person to have his number retired by the Yankees on Saturday, and the team followed up the ceremony by beating the Chicago White Sox.
Video: An Interview With Joe Torre



Djokovic Says Family Is Now His No. 1 Focus
By BEN ROTHENBERG
Novak Djokovic arrives at the United States Open with a new wife and a child on the way, changes in his life that he says have affected his priorities.

At the U.S. Open, Making a Statement That's Clear, and Loud
By RAVI UBHA
H&M and Uniqlo - two clothing retailers that are relatively new entrants into the tennis world - appear to be making inroads in a sector traditionally dominated by Nike and Adidas.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Streets Paved in Gold
The illusion that the streets of Manhattan are paved with gold almost came to a reality this week.

Arts

MUSIC REVIEW
Papier-Mâché Heads and a Surprise Guest
By NATE CHINEN
In the first of a three-night stand at Barclays Center on Friday, Arcade Fire hit high marks with durable standards, and an arch shrug and wolfish grin toward some critics.

These Kids Today
By DAVE ITZKOFF
Eighteen years after it was first staged, "This Is Our Youth," Kenneth Lonergan's caustic study of dissolute young adults, reaches Broadway.

A Failed Love and a Museum's Birth
By KEN JOHNSON
Lauren Gunderson's play "Bauer" delves into the mostly forgotten drama revolving around two important figures in the founding of the Guggenheim Museum.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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  • 155 days ago via site
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N.Y. Today: Tests for Jury Duty Get Personal; Hint of Scandal Embroils Queens Library's Leaders-NYT-PALMERA 777-10-04-2014-4-CERCO SANITARIO-24-08-14-8-9-10-SUSPENSO
Thursday, August 21, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

The Easiest, Hardest Month

Good morning to you on this cloudy Thursday.
Look around, everybody. Say hi.
We should feel a certain solidarity, simply because it's August and we're here - unlike the hordes who have fled the city for Provence or Provincetown.
It can be challenging to be left behind. You may ask yourself how you got stuck here.
But there are certain rewards for having stayed behind: A better night's sleep, thanks to the smokeless, quiet bar entrance below, or a seat on the subway at rush hour.
Some things become refreshingly easier when so many people leave New York at once. But of course, other things get harder.
Here are a few:
More of the day's news »



News

TV Habits? Medical History? Tests for Jury Duty Get Personal
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Questionnaires, rather than oral Q. and A.'s, have become increasingly familiar in courtrooms across America.
Interactive Feature: Will You Be Seated on a Jury?



Hint of Scandal Embroils Queens Library's Leaders
By AL BAKER
A criminal inquiry is examining spending by Thomas W. Galante, president of the Queens Public Library, including whether he steered construction contracts to an acquaintance.

De Blasio, Seeking Calm in Chokehold Case, Turns to Clergy
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM and NIKITA STEWART
Mayor Bill de Blasio and clergy members met to discuss tensions between the police and the community surrounding the death of a Staten Island man in police custody.

Former Aéropostale Executive Is Sentenced to 8 Years for Fraud
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Christopher Finazzo, the former second in command at Aéropostale, the apparel company, was convicted of fraud and conspiracy in a scheme with a vendor.

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Features

BUILDING BLOCKS
A Brooklyn Map That Shows Battle Positions Instead of Trader Joe's
By DAVID W. DUNLAP
The borough's historical society is exhibiting the map carried by Lt. Gen. Hugh Percy in the Battle of Brooklyn in 1776, marking the American positions the British intended to overrun.
More Building Blocks Columns



To Feed More People, a Meal Service Asks Rich Donors for Help
By WINNIE HU
Citymeals-on-Wheels, a nonprofit food provider, has started a program in which wealthy donors can opt to sponsor meal delivery in a specific area.

Sports

ASTROS 5, YANKEES 2
Yankees Cautious About Pineda in Loss That Damages Their Playoff Hopes
By JORGE ARANGURE Jr.
Michael Pineda helped the Yankees to a 2-1 lead, but he was pulled in the seventh inning after 89 pitches in an eventual loss to Houston.

METS 8, ATHLETICS 5
Offensive Spark Helps the Mets End a Losing Streak
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Mets are hoping to build on Wednesday's offensive performance, in which Lucas Duda hit a three-run homer and Eric Campbell also homered as the team beat the Oakland Athletics.

A Close Look at Murray and Sharapova Preparing for the U.S. Open (Psst: It's Free)
By STUART MILLER
The Open lets fans in free the week before the tournament to watch qualifying matches, but one of New York's best-kept secrets is that the top players are also in attendance and practicing.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

VIDEO: Money Talks. We Sing.
As the Metropolitan Opera's management and unions negotiated behind one set of closed doors, performers carried on with their rehearsals behind others.
Related Article



Arts
Metropolitan Opera Clears Last Major Hurdle in Labor Talks
By MICHAEL COOPER
The Met's management and the union representing its stagehands reached a contract deal, allowing the company to go ahead with its coming season of performances.

CHECKING BACK
A New Set of Believers, but the Same Peppy Faith
By BEN BRANTLEY
After more than three years on Broadway, "The Book of Mormon" retains its peppiness and devotion to the musical comedy spirit.
alt=.>Memories of 'The Book of Mormon'



OPERA REVIEW
Shakespeare's Preening Con Man, as Seen by Salieri, Then Updated
By VIVIEN SCHWEITZER
Antonio Salieri's "Falstaff" is part of the dell'Arte Opera Ensemble's A Summer of Shakespeare festival at the East 13th Street Theater.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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N.Y. Today: Housing Rules Keep Sex Offenders in Prison Beyond Release Dates; Abduction Case Shows Challenges Amish Face
Friday, August 22, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Cool, Cool Summer

Good morning on this foggy Friday.
Lightning, thunder - that was a proper summer storm last night.
But not entirely. A proper summer storm would have brought quenching relief after a sticky day. Afterward, it would have felt steamy again.
Instead it was just wet. Still cool, just wet.
Our columnist Andy Newman looked into this mild summer, and how that affected some key players - for example, ice cream truck vendors.
Should you find yourself wondering exactly how cool the summer was:
• There have been no heat waves (defined as three days in a row of temperatures above 90). The mercury has touched 90 only four times and it has never gotten above 91.
More of the day's news »



News
Housing Restrictions Keep Sex Offenders in Prison Beyond Release Dates
By JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN
A new interpretation of a New York State law on where the offenders can live means that homeless shelters within 1,000 feet of a school are off limits.

Abduction Case Tests Limits of Amish Ties to Modern World
By KIRK SEMPLE
The kidnapping of two girls in Oswegatchie, N.Y., highlighted the challenges the Amish face by adhering to a 19th-century lifestyle in a 21st-century world.

At Arab Bank's Terrorism Trial, Victim Recalls Seeing Suicide Bomber's Body
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
In federal court in Brookyn, Brian Faudem recounted a 2003 bombing at a Tel Aviv bar, one of 24 acts linked to Hamas by plaintiffs who have accused the bank of financing terrorism.
Judge Drops Charges for 8 in an Inquiry on Benefits
By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.
Six police officers and two others were among 136 workers accused of faking mental illness to obtain disability benefits.

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Features

A Basketball League Whose Success Isn't Measured in Points
By KIA GREGORY
The Positive Influence league, whose season is restricted to summer because space at nearby school gyms is booked by adult leagues, provides an outlet for teenagers on the Upper West Side.

Sports

YANKEES 3, ASTROS 0
With Extra Pep, McCarthy Prevents Sweep With a Shutout
By JORGE ARANGURE Jr.
The late-season acquisition shut out the Houston Astros in a victory that kept the Yankees from being swept at home by one of the worst teams in baseball.

N.F.L. ROUNDUP
Jets-Giants Meeting Won't Be About Their Rivalry
By TOM PEDULLA
In a preseason game Friday night, the two teams will focus on addressing their own obvious deficiencies.

URBAN ATHLETE
And All That Time You Thought You Were Just Playing
By MICHELA TINDERA
For New Yorkers who miss their childhood Slip 'N Slides, there are classes in Midtown Manhattan that recreate the experience.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

VIDEO: An Interview With Joe Torre
On Saturday, Aug. 23, the Yankees will retire Joe Torre's number in a ceremony at Yankee Stadium. The New York Times's Tyler Kepner recently interviewed Torre about his long baseball career.
Related Article



Arts

Son Discovers His Father's Life of Crime Is Now a Work of Art by Warhol
By TATIANA SCHLOSSBERG
Reading a review of an exhibition at the Queens Museum, George Lawler was shocked to see a photograph with a portrait of his father, who robbed a bank in 1955.

ART REVIEW
Midtown Manhattan Wouldn't Be the Same
By JOSEPH GIOVANNINI
"Times Square, 1984: The Postmodern Moment," at the Skyscraper Museum, displays attempts to reimagine Manhattan's central neighborhood.

CHECKING BACK
It's Still Popular Being Green
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
"Wicked," which passed the 10-year mark last fall, evinces little sign of box office fatigue, especially among tweens.
Memories of 'Wicked'


For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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Today's Headlines: U.S. Weighs Direct Military Action Against ISIS in Syria
Today's Headlines Saturday, August 23, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Travel | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

U.S. Weighs Direct Military Action Against ISIS in Syria
By PETER BAKER and MICHAEL D. SHEAR
A top national security adviser to President Obama said the United States was "not going to be restricted by borders" to protect its interests, including possibly pursuing direct military action in Syria.

U.S. Isn't Sure Just How Much to Fear ISIS
By MARK MAZZETTI and HELENE COOPER
With the rapid advance of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, the rhetoric the Obama administration is using to describe the danger the group poses to the United States has escalated.

Russians Open Fire in Ukraine, NATO Reports
By ANDREW HIGGINS and MICHAEL R. GORDON
NATO officials said that the Russian military had moved artillery units inside Ukrainian territory in recent days and was using them to fire at Ukrainian forces.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

WORLD
Executions in Gaza Are a Warning to Spies
By FARES AKRAM and JODI RUDOREN
Witnesses said more than a dozen were killed in what was seen as a message to potential informants after Israel's assassination of three militant leaders.
Gaza Talks Build at U.N.



OPINION | ROOM FOR DEBATE
Should the U.S. Work With Assad to Fight ISIS?
Is the militant group such a threat to the United States that working with the despised Syrian dictator would be in the national interest?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"Let the physical evidence tell us what happened. How badly injured was the police officer? Was he dazed? Was Michael Brown on drugs? Let's see what's really going on here."
PAT DIAZ, a former South Florida homicide detective who investigated more than 100 police shootings, on the shooting in Ferguson, Mo.


Today's Video

VIDEO: A Preview of the U.S. Open
Here's what to look for at this year's United States Open.

VIDEO: Bill Cunningham | Streets Paved in Gold
The illusion that the streets of Manhattan are paved with gold almost came to a reality this week.

VIDEO: The Long March to Peace
Gary Hill, an associate minister, lives in Ferguson, Mo., just a few blocks from where Michael Brown was killed on Aug. 9. He's urged for peace amid the volatile protests, with mixed results.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Pentagon Says Chinese Fighter Jet Confronted American Navy Plane
By HELENE COOPER
The Chinese plane flew within 30 feet of the Navy aircraft on Tuesday in international airspace just off the Chinese coast, the Pentagon said.

THE SATURDAY PROFILE
American's Star Power Unrivaled in Japan
By MARTIN FACKLER
David Spector, with his bleach-blond hair and ability to deliver one-liners in flawless Japanese, has been a fixture in Japan's often raucous talk-show world for 30 years.

Blackouts in Egypt Prompt Accusations
By KAREEM FAHIM and MERNA THOMAS
Officials blamed supporters of a deposed leader, while others pointed fingers back at the government.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Blood Industry Shrinks as Transfusions Decline
By MATTHEW L. WALD
Medical advances have increased efficiency, but the trend is forcing an enormous wave of mergers and job cutbacks.

Key Factor in Police Shootings: 'Reasonable Fear'
By MICHAEL WINES and FRANCES ROBLES
A host of outside factors, from an officer's perception of a threat to the suspect's behavior and even his size, can emerge as mitigating or damning.
U.S. Faces Suit Over Tactics at Immigrant Detention Center
By JULIA PRESTON
Civil rights groups claim that the government committed due process violations against women and children held for deportation at a detention center in New Mexico.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

As Arizona Primary Nears, Governor Candidates Turn Eyes to Border
By FERNANDA SANTOS
The six Republican candidates to succeed Jan Brewer as governor of Arizona are jumping over each other to sound tough on illegal immigration.

Emails Show Bigger Fund-Raising Role for Wisconsin Leader
By ADAM NAGOURNEY and MICHAEL BARBARO
Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin played a greater role than previously known in arranging for wealthy contributors to donate to a conservative organization, according to court documents.
Document: Case File on Fund-Raising for a Group Helping Gov. Scott Walker


Florida Judge Deals a Blow to Democrats on Districting
By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
After the Republican-led Legislature's map was ruled unconstitutional last month, a slightly modified version is approved, but the 2014 election will proceed under the old map.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Fed Chief Sees Not Enough Data to Raise Rates
By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM
At her first keynote speech for the Federal Reserve's annual conference, Janet Yellen says she wants to see more evidence of a labor market recovery.
The Upshot: Worrisome Long-Term Economic Trends

The Upshot: Why the Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs After All



Efforts to Revive Rich California Mine Hit Strong Resistance
By CAROL POGASH
Where forty-niners once roamed, a plan to dig up 240,000 ounces of gold is vehemently opposed by local residents who fear damage to the environment and their way of life.

BITS BLOG
U.S. Finds 'Backoff' Hacker Tool Is Widespread
By NICOLE PERLROTH
The Department of Homeland Security said on Friday that more than 1,000 businesses had been infected with the cash register malware used in the Target data breach and others, leading to the theft of data from millions of customers' payment cards.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

BITS BLOG
Android Phones Hit by 'Ransomware'
By NICOLE PERLROTH
Hackers have figured out how to lock people out of their Android devices and demand money in exchange for letting them back in.

COMMON SENSE
Big Payoffs in HP Suit, for Lawyers
By JAMES B. STEWART
When Hewlett shareholders sued over "unlawful behavior" in the takeover of Autonomy, they didn't expect to be shut out in a possible settlement.

Why We're Not Driving the Friendly Skies
By STUART F. BROWN
The dream of creating a flying car has reduced many would-be inventors to despair as they grasped the immensity of the engineering and design challenges of the divergent natures of airplanes and cars.
Terrafugia Transition

Pie-in-the-Sky Flying Cars From the Past

Slide Show: Wheels and Wings


For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

A Tennis Board Woven With Conflicts
By MARY PILON and ANDREW W. LEHREN
An examination of the United States Tennis Association's finances shows that several of the group's current and recent board members have benefited from its grants and contracts.

Japanese Swimming Has Momentum at Its Back
By KAREN CROUSE
The momentum the Japanese are building at the Pan Pacific Championships could carry over to the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

THE UPSHOT
Duke of Hawaii: A Swimmer and Surfer Who Straddled Two Cultures
By MICHAEL BESCHLOSS
Duke Kahanamoku, who helped America become a little more Hawaiian by spreading the gospel of surfing, also helped Hawaii become more American.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

An Encore 35 Years in the Making
By MELENA RYZIK
Kate Bush steps onto a London stage next week for her first live shows since 1979, and her fans are traversing continents to take part.

Turin Opera's Music Director Threatens to Leave
By MICHAEL COOPER
Gianandrea Noseda, Teatro Regio's music director, says he will not renew his contract unless the general manager, Walter Vergnano, is replaced.

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK
Champion of Jazz Talent Brings His Work Home
By NATE CHINEN
Bruce Lundvall, a former president of Blue Note Records now in an assisted-living center, has brought music to his turf with the Sunrise Senior Living Jazz Festival.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

New York's Top Jail Investigator Resigns After Inquiry on Rikers Brutality
By MICHAEL WINERIP and MICHAEL SCHWIRTZ
Florence L. Finkle's resignation is the first of many changes expected in response to a federal inquiry that found a "culture of violence" at Rikers Island.

Fatal Confrontation Heightens Tensions in Staten Island Police Precinct
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
Complaints of misconduct by officers in the 120th Precinct on the North Shore rival those in the Bronx and Brooklyn.

Assault Charge Against City Council's Ex-Finance Director Is Thrown Out
By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.
A judge tossed out domestic violence charges against Charles Preston Niblack after prosecutors said an investigation had failed to turn up evidence supporting the accusations against him.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Travel

PURSUITS
Dollywood: A Little Bit Country, a Little Bit Gay
By KIM SEVERSON
Views of Dolly Parton's wildly popular theme park in Tennessee can differ significantly depending on one's lens.

OVER THERE
100 Years of Gratitude
By RICHARD RUBIN
A century later, exploring America's contribution to World War I in a country that's still thankful for it.

FOOTSTEPS
Searching for 'Anne of Green Gables' on Prince Edward Island
By ANN MAH
More than 100 years after its publication, the book still pulls fans to its island setting.
For more travel news, go to NYTimes.com/Travel »

Obituaries

Deborah Sussman, Who Dressed Buildings in Vivid Colors and Shapes, Dies at 83
By JOSEPH GIOVANNINI
Known for a bold use of color, Ms. Sussman was an early advocate of applying print elements to campuses, buildings and cityscapes.

Simin Behbahani, Outspoken Iranian Poet, Dies at 87
By DOUGLAS MARTIN
Ms. Behbahani touched on sensitive topics in her poems, often upsetting Iranian authorities.

Robert Sherrill, Author Who Skewered Right and Left, Dies at 89
By WILLIAM YARDLEY
Mr. Sherrill rose to prominence in the 1960s and '70s for his provocative assessments of gun culture, military justice, Lyndon B. Johnson and other political topics.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
A March for a Safer City
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Will aggrieved residents achieve some level of faith in the future of policing in Mayor Bill de Blasio's New York?
Sri Lanka's Intransigence

Questions for the Patent Office



For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
The Danger of Combustible Dust
By RAFAEL MOURE-ERASO
Tiny particles can ignite. But these explosions are readily preventable.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Gift Horses Gone Wild
By GAIL COLLINS
Who's been following the trial of Bob McDonnell in Virginia and knows what FLOVA means?
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Lessons Not Learned
By JOE NOCERA
The S.&L. crisis could have helped us avoid the financial crisis.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 23, 1927, Italian-born anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were executed in Boston for the murders of two men during a 1920 robbery.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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N.Y. Today: Opera and Two Unions Reach a Tentative Deal; In Five Years, U.S. Prosecutor Touches New York's Biggest Story Lines-NYT-PALMERA 777-10-04-2014-4-CERCO SANITARIO-24-08-14-4-5-6
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Singing, Not Striking

Good morning on this fair, dry Tuesday.
On Monday, the Metropolitan Opera reached a labor agreement with its chorus and orchestra, averting a lockout just weeks before opening night.
We talked to David Frye, a tenor in the chorus for 21 years, on Monday evening, as he left rehearsal.
"You know, I think I feel good," said Mr. Frye, the chairman of the chorus's negotiating committee.
The unions agreed to their first pay cut in decades - which the opera house had said was necessary because of declining ticket sales and spiraling costs.
But management also compromised, stepping down from its steepest demands and agreeing to its own cuts.
The mood at rehearsal on Monday, Mr. Frye said, was different from usual.
More of the day's news »



News

In Surprise Finale at Metropolitan Opera's Labor Talks, Both Sides Agree to Cuts
By MICHAEL COOPER
The deal had compromises from both sides, with the unions agreeing to their first pay cut in decades and management abandoning its toughest demands and agreeing to make significant reductions of its own.

In Five Years, a Federal Prosecutor Has Taken On Terrorism, Corruption and Cuomo
By BENJAMIN WEISER and BEN PROTESS
During his tenure as the United States attorney in Manhattan, Preet Bharara has embraced the media spotlight while fighting attempts to politicize justice.

Man Who Helped Long Island Counselor to Kill Himself Makes Plea Deal, Lawyer Says
By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.
Kenneth Minor is expected to plead guilty to first-degree manslaughter for helping Jeffrey Locker, a motivational speaker, commit suicide in 2009.
Livery Drivers Are on Edge After Two Killings This Month in the Bronx
By WINNIE HU and NATE SCHWEBER
The deaths of Maodo Kane and Aboubacar Bah raise the specter of the 1990s, when dozens of drivers were killed in a single year and many others were attacked.

A Fire in Manhattan Kills One and Injures 12
By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS and KATE PASTOR
The blaze tore through the six floors of an apartment building on West 136th Street near Amsterdam Avenue; the cause was under investigation but was considered suspicious, an official said.

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Columnist

THE APPRAISAL
Easy on the Environment, but Not Necessarily the Eyes
By MATT A. V CHABAN
Thomas Paino planned an environmentally friendly interior for his Queens rowhouse, but then embraced a bold design for its exterior, which has prompted vigorous debate.
More Appraisal Columns



Sports

CUBS 4, METS 1
A Start on No Days' Rest Almost Rescues the Mets
By JORGE ARANGURE Jr.
Carlos Torres filled in admirably for Bartolo Colon in the Mets' 4-1 loss to the Cubs.

ROUNDUP
Giants Banged Up, Nothing More Serious
By BILL PENNINGTON
Starting cornerback Prince Amukamara (strained groin muscle) and middle linebacker Jon Beason (foot) each had encouraging news on their recoveries, with both expecting to be ready for the season opener on Sept. 8.

A Group Lifts Paraclimbers to Higher Goals
By JEFF DiNUNZIO
The Adaptive Climbing Group, the brainchild of Kareemah Batts, of Brooklyn, is helping paraclimbers, some of whom have been training for the world championships in Spain next month.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

REPLAY: A LOOK BACK AT HISTORY
A Time to Roll
New York City might have been the cultural epicenter for roller skating in the 1970s.

Arts

Humans of New York Goes Global
By JONAH BROMWICH
The creator of the popular photography blog Humans of New York, which focuses on street life in the city, is now documenting the everyday lives of people near trouble spots around the world.

CHECKING BACK
Frolicking to Abba on a Greek Isle Retains Sweetness, if Not Shine
By ANITA GATES
Audiences may no longer be dancing in the aisles, but "Mamma Mia!" is still a joy 13 years later.
Memories of 'Mamma Mia!'



OPERA REVIEW | 'TESEO'
All It Really Needs Is a Fairy Godmother
By CORINNA da FONSECA-WOLLHEIM
The Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra presented a performance of "Teseo" on Sunday as part of the Mostly Mozart Festival.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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Today's Headlines: Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson
Today's Headlines Wednesday, August 20, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Dining & Wine | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Shooting Accounts Differ as Holder Schedules Visit to Ferguson
By FRANCES ROBLES and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
Witnesses to the shooting death of a black teenager by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., have given investigators sharply conflicting accounts, as a county grand jury prepared to hear evidence in the case.
Timeline: Tension in Ferguson

Photographs: Week of Outcry and Confrontation in Ferguson



NEWS ANALYSIS
Shared Vision, Varying Styles
By PETER BAKER and MATT APUZZO
The differences between Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. and President Obama have drawn criticism in recent days, as some praise one's outspokenness and lament another's caution.
Calling for Calm in Ferguson, Obama Cites Need for Improved Race Relations

The Upshot: Not Just Ferguson: National Guard Has a Long History With Civil Unrest



Next Leader May Echo Maliki, but Iraqis Hope for New Results
By TIM ARANGO and MICHAEL R. GORDON
During the American occupation, Haider al-Abadi, a Shiite chosen to be Iraq's next prime minister, resisted the idea of reconciliation with Sunnis, but some hope he can break the mold of recent leaders and govern in an inclusive way.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

WORLD | LISTENING POST
Obama Holds to Afghanistan Withdrawal Deadline
By MARK LANDLER
The president was rejecting a growing chorus of arguments in Washington that the chaos in Iraq should prompt him to reconsider his timetable for withdrawing the last soldiers from Afghanistan by the end of 2016.

OPINION | OP-ED | THOMAS B. EDSALL
Ferguson, Watts and a Dream Deferred
By THOMAS B. EDSALL
Over the past 15 years, three decades of black progress have gone up in smoke.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"Reality became scarier than science fiction."
FYODOR D. BEREZIN, a once-obscure Ukrainian science-fiction writer who was surprised by his rapid promotion through the rebel ranks to deputy defense minister of the separatist Donetsk People's Republic.


Today's Video

VIDEO: The Man Primed to Lead Iraq
Iraq is looking to a new leader in Haider al-Abadi as he prepares to replace Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, who has said he will give up power.
Related Article



VIDEO: Nicholas Felton: A Quantified Life
Mr. Felton, an information designer who used to work at Facebook, has tracked almost every aspect of his life, from the miles he's walked to the average length of his personal conversations.
Related Article



VIDEO: Intersection | Casual Style in Glasgow
In the West End of Glasgow, Blossom Mccuaig cites old movies and local vintage shops as her inspirations.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Plenty of Room at the Top of Ukraine's Fading Rebellion
By ANDREW E. KRAMER
In what separatist officials call the "Ukrainianization" of the leadership, almost all the original Russian leaders of the rebellion have resigned and gone home, replaced by Ukrainians of dubious qualifications.

Ukrainian and Russian Leaders Will Meet as Rebels Continue to Falter
By ANDREW HIGGINS and ANDREW E. KRAMER
The government said it saw a chance for peace in eastern Ukraine after word that the two leaders and European Union officials would meet next week.
German Leader Emerges as Key Figure in Ukraine Talks



Militant Group Says It Killed American Journalist in Syria
By RUKMINI CALLIMACHI
The terrorist group ISIS said it executed James Foley in retaliation for American airstrikes in Iraq.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Ski Town May Face Winter Without Popular Path to Slopes
By JACK HEALY
One of Utah's most popular ski resorts is facing eviction in a legal dispute that may not be settled by the time winter kicks in.

Neither Obama Nor Congress Seems Eager for a Vote on Military Action in Iraq
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
Congress has not asked for a vote to approve military action in Iraq aimed at ISIS militants, and President Obama is not seeking one.

Advocates Seek to Delay Deportations for Millions
By JULIA PRESTON
Since legislation failed on Capitol Hill, immigrant advocacy groups have turned their focus on the president, demanding that he halt most deportations.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

On Senate Menu, Bean Soup and a Serving of 'Hyperpartisanship'
By ASHLEY PARKER
Comity has been eroding for years in Washington, but to see the fractured Senate in a more personal way, one has only to visit the exclusive dining room.

Sister and Wife of Ex-Governor Become Focus in Virginia Trial
By JONATHAN WEISMAN and KEN MAGUIRE
The testimony also tried to counter a prosecution contention that money woes made Bob McDonnell and his wife susceptible to cash offerings while he was governor.

Rick Perry, Fighting Charges, Hires High-Profile Legal Team in Texas
By DAVID MONTGOMERY
Gov. Rick Perry, who is facing a felony indictment, appeared at the Travis County Courthouse to be photographed and fingerprinted.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

Atlantic City Grapples With Empty Spaces
By JON HURDLE
Government and industry officials are trying to determine how and whether former gambling, hotel and resort spaces might be reused.

DEALBOOK
Caught Backsliding, Standard Chartered Is Fined $300 Million
By BEN PROTESS
Standard Chartered will also be prevented from processing payments in dollars for "high-risk retail business clients" in Hong Kong, with the bank's monitor determining which clients are "high risk."

In Need of Rewiring
By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS
Radio Shack's ubiquitous stores flourished when consumers fixed their own gadgets. Now, the chain is trying out brighter, more inviting stores to lure shoppers.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

Uber Picks David Plouffe to Wage Regulatory Fight
By MIKE ISAAC
Mr. Plouffe, who ran President Obama's 2008 campaign, will be in charge of policy and strategy for the car service start-up.

Steve Ballmer Quits Microsoft Board, Citing His Outside Duties
By NICK WINGFIELD
The tech company's former chief executive said new responsibilities, including ownership of the Los Angeles Clippers, have made him too busy to serve.

DEALBOOK
Overstock to Allow International Customers to Pay in Bitcoin
By SYDNEY EMBER
The move by popular retailers like Overstock to accept Bitcoins for international transactions could lead to more widespread adoption of the virtual currency.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
Islanders' Owner Announces He Will Sell the Team to an Investment Group
By RICHARD SANDOMIR
The Islanders said Tuesday that the team would be sold to a former Washington Capitals co-owner and a London-based investor.

Sports Illustrated and, Maybe in a Few Years, a Driver's License
By JERÉ LONGMAN
At 13, the Little League pitcher Mo'ne Davis has become one of America's most famous athletes, and she is already learning to say "no" to some of the ceaseless media requests.

ON BASEBALL
Outsize Production
By TYLER KEPNER
At 5 feet 6, the Houston Astros second baseman Jose Altuve is one of two shortest players in Major League Baseball, but he was leading all players in batting average and hits.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

More Than a Century Later, Sophia Tolstoy Has Her Say
By WILLIAM GRIMES
Tolstoy's spouse, Sophia, wrote two novellas in reply to his story "The Kreutzer Sonata," works that will be included in "The Kreutzer Sonata Variations," from Yale University Press.

In the Race for Oscars, Toronto Puts Up a Hurdle
By MICHAEL CIEPLY
The Toronto International Film Festival has closed its first four days to any movie that previously played elsewhere, a move that some think will threaten smaller films' Oscar chances.

IMAGINE THIS
Saluting the Women Behind the Screen
By CHRIS SUELLENTROP
Conceiving a museum exhibition devoted to women in the video game industry, which hasn't always welcomed them.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

CITY HALL MEMO
De Blasio Encounters Rising Friction Over Liberal Expectations
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Faced with the realities of pension costs, budget deficits and a scarcity of federal support, the mayor has struggled to please his supporters.

Grand Jury to Take Up Death Linked to Police Chokehold in Staten Island
By J. DAVID GOODMAN and JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN
District Attorney Daniel M. Donovan Jr. said he would have a panel investigate the death of Eric Garner, which the medical examiner's office ruled a homicide.

Exonerated Man Reaches $10 Million Deal With New York City
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Jabbar Collins spent 16 years in prison for the 1994 killing of an Orthodox rabbi. His case exposed several questionable tactics used by the Brooklyn district attorney's office.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Dining & Wine

RESTAURANT REVIEW: DELAWARE AND HUDSON
A Recipe Book That Does Not Stray Far
By PETE WELLS
Delaware and Hudson in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, features the chef's version of old-fashioned dishes from the mid-Atlantic region.

Brisket Is Worth the Wait
By JULIA MOSKIN
Brisket, part of the Texas Trinity of barbecue, has been enthusiastically embraced by New Yorkers.

Alan Harding, a Brooklyn Restaurant Pioneer, Reshapes His Career
By ALAN FEUER
Mr. Harding proved you could open Manhattan-worthy restaurants in Brooklyn and succeed. Too many competitors got the message.
For more dining news and recipes, go to NYTimes.com/Dining »

Obituaries

Edward G. Leffingwell, Curator, Dies at 72
By ROBERTA SMITH
Mr. Leffingwell brought avant-garde artists to the attention of the public in New York, Los Angeles and Latin America.

John Blake Jr., Versatile Jazz Violinist, Dies at 67
By NATE CHINEN
He combined strong classical technique with the expressive power of African-American spirituals, folk music and blues.

James Schiro, Goldman's Lead Director, Dies at 68
By LANDON THOMAS Jr.
Mr. Schiro was also a veteran financial insider who led PricewaterhouseCoopers and, more recently, Zurich Financial Services.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
Better Governing Through Data
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
A new initiative by Comptroller Scott Stringer aims to save New York City money and solve problems the way CompStat has helped the N.Y.P.D. reduce crime.
Prime Minister Modi Fumbles on Pakistan

The Right to Cheat and Maim?


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR
Who Will Stand Up for the Christians?
By RONALD S. LAUDER
People are getting killed because of their beliefs. Jews have a duty to speak up.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Alone Again, Naturally
By MAUREEN DOWD
The rock-star candidate who got elected on his electrifying promise has become a bored bird in a gilded cage.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Will the Ends, Will the Means
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Some important questions have gone unanswered in the Syria blame game.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 20, 1968, the Soviet Union and other Warsaw Pact nations invaded Czechoslovakia to crush the ''Prague Spring'' liberalization drive of Alexander Dubcek's regime.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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N.Y. Today: Mayor Encounters Rising Friction Over Liberal Expectations; Grand Jury to Take Up Death Linked to Chokehold
Wednesday, August 20, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

As a subscriber to New York Today, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top-Shelf Tennis, and Free

Good morning on this warmer Wednesday.
Catching a glimpse of the U.S. Open next week could be difficult.
But there is plenty of world-class tennis to be seen this week at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, Queens – all of it free.
The action comes in two flavors.
One is the qualifying tournament, the battle of the underdogs in which 128 men and 128 women compete for the last 32 spots in the main tournament.
It started on Tuesday and continues through Friday.
"The people involved are ranked too low to qualify automatically for the tournament," said Naila-Jean Meyers, an editor in Sports who oversees The Times's tennis coverage. "Those players include veterans and young up-and-comers."
More of the day's news »



News

CITY HALL MEMO
De Blasio Encounters Rising Friction Over Liberal Expectations
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Faced with the realities of pension costs, budget deficits and a scarcity of federal support, the mayor has struggled to please his supporters.

Grand Jury to Take Up Death Linked to Police Chokehold in Staten Island
By J. DAVID GOODMAN and JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN
District Attorney Daniel M. Donovan Jr. said he would have a panel investigate the death of Eric Garner, which the medical examiner's office ruled a homicide.

Exonerated Man Reaches $10 Million Deal With New York City
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Jabbar Collins spent 16 years in prison for the 1994 killing of an Orthodox rabbi. His case exposed several questionable tactics used by the Brooklyn district attorney's office.
Injury Claims Against New York's Correction Dept. Doubled in 5 Years, Report Says
By NIKITA STEWART
The city comptroller's office linked the increase to inmates with mental health issues and to the use of solitary confinement at the Rikers Island jail complex.

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Features

A Bronck in the Bronx Gives a Swedish Town a Reason to Cheer
By SAM ROBERTS
Jonas Bronck arrived 375 years ago as the first European in the Bronx, an occasion that will be commemorated by descendants and dignitaries from both countries.

Columnist

ABOUT NEW YORK
As the Sun Sets Over Coney Island, Nostalgia Glows With Renewal
By JIM DWYER
Reborn after Hurricane Sandy's destruction, the Boardwalk has been transformed into a gentler version its gritty former self.
More About New York Columns



Sports
Islanders' Owner Announces He Will Sell the Team to an Investment Group
By RICHARD SANDOMIR
The Islanders said Tuesday that the team would be sold to a former Washington Capitals co-owner and a London-based investor.

ASTROS 7, YANKEES 4
With Yankees' Opportunity Knocking, Astros Rudely Slam the Door
By TOM PEDULLA
The Yankees added to a season of missed chances when Chris Carter, who had struck out in each of his first four at-bats, crushed a tie-breaking three-run homer against closer David Robertson.

N.F.L. ROUNDUP
Beckham Jr., Giants' Top Pick, Back on Sideline
By BILL PENNINGTON
Odell Beckham Jr., a wide receiver who was the Giants' first-round draft pick, has a sore hamstring and will miss Friday's preseason game against the Jets.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

HUNGRY CITY | INDIAN ROAD CAFE
An Emerald Atop Manhattan
By JEFF GORDINIER
At Indian Road Cafe in Inwood, there is scant evidence of the grating strain of foodie consciousness that has infiltrated American culture.

Arts

Don Pardo, the Voice of 'SNL,' Is Dead at 96
By NEIL GENZLINGER
An announcer whose career began with radio and grew with popular game shows like "The Price Is Right," Mr. Pardo was best known for decades of introducing stars on the sketch comedy.
A Voice on Television That Stood Out



A Voice on Television That Stood Out
By JAMES BARRON
Before "Saturday Night Live," Don Pardo was known in New York, where he spent his early career making the mundane sound important.

CHECKING BACK
A Little Bit Naughty (and a Lot of Fun)
By ALEXIS SOLOSKI
Its stars keep aging out of the title role, but "Matilda the Musical" remains sly and graceful.
Memories of 'Matilda the Musical'


For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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  • 155 days ago via site
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Today's Headlines: Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck at Least 6 Times-NYT-PALMERA 777-10-04-2014-4-CERCO SANITARIO-24-08-14
Today's Headlines Monday, August 18, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Media & Advertising | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck at Least 6 Times
By FRANCES ROBLES and JULIE BOSMAN
A private, family-requested autopsy shows that Michael Brown was shot at least six times - twice in the head - with all of the bullets striking him in the front.

Violence Flares in Ferguson After Appeals for Harmony
By ALAN BLINDER and TANZINA VEGA
Despite efforts throughout the day in local churches to tamp down the outrage, the most chaotic violence in a week of unrest broke out in Ferguson, Mo., on Sunday night.
Timeline: Tension in Ferguson

Interactive: Week of Outcry and Confrontation in Ferguson

Video: A Protest Ignited



In Torn Gaza, if Roof Stands, It's Now Home
By JODI RUDOREN
With an estimated 11,000 homes destroyed and many more severely damaged, Gaza's housing and humanitarian troubles are just beginning.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S.
Seeking New Start, Finding Steep Cost
By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
Millions of Americans have trained for new careers through the $3.1 billion Workforce Investment Act, but many have not found the promised new career and are instead faced with thousands of dollars of debt.

OPINION | ROOM FOR DEBATE
Should Parents Share Images of Their Kids Online?
Is sharing videos and pictures a violation of a child's right to privacy, or a simple act to remain connected to friends and family?

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"People have been asking: how many times was he shot? This information could have been released on Day 1. They don't do that, even as feelings built up among the citizenry that there was a cover-up. We are hoping to alleviate that."
DR. MICHAEL M. BADEN, former chief medical examiner for the City of New York, after performing an independent autopsy on Michael Brown, the unarmed teenager shot to death in Ferguson, Mo.


Today's Video

VIDEO: Native Fantasy: Germany's Indian Heroes
Germany's biggest folk hero is an Apache who fights for justice three hours north of Berlin and has inspired spiritual seekers. But some parts of Native American culture get lost in translation.
Related Article



VIDEO: From Field to Front Office
Sergio Silva is one of a growing number of Hispanics who own or operate farms in the United States.
Related Article



VIDEO: Vows | Celebrity Stylists Wed on the Fly
Ted Gibson and Jason Backe, celebrity hairstylists who run Ted Gibson Beauty together, married "flash mob" style in a Manhattan park.
Related Article


For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Kurds Move to Retake Dam as U.S. Bombs Weaken ISIS
By AZAM AHMED and BEN HUBBARD
The Sunni militants appeared to be falling back on several fronts after two days of American airstrikes in Iraq, Kurdish officials said, as pesh merga troops pushed toward Mosul.
Ukraine Says Army Controls Center of a Rebel City
By ANDREW E. KRAMER
The military moved into the heart of the separatist hub for the first time, officials said, chipping at one of the cornerstones of the pro-Russia rebels' disintegrating virtual state.

For Chinese, Pope Seems Worlds Away in South Korea
By EDWARD WONG
The sparse news treatment of the pope's first visit to the Far East is indicative of the Chinese Communist Party's continuing attempts to maintain a tight grip on Catholicism.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

Treatment in U.S. Is Rare Chance to Study Ebola
By DENISE GRADY
The treatment in Atlanta of two American missionaries allows for extensive testing not available during outbreaks in Africa.

'Ice Bucket Challenge' Has Raised Millions for ALS Association
By EMILY STEEL
The "Ice Bucket Challenge," a campaign to raise money to fight Lou Gehrig's disease, has caught fire on social media, with celebrities drenching themselves in ice water.

New Drug Helps Some Bald Patients Regrow Hair
By PAM BELLUCK
The drug, which suppresses immune system activity, showed significant results for several sufferers of the autoimmune disease alopecia areata.
For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Oil Industry's Taxes Create Odd Wedge for Alaskan Voters
By KIRK JOHNSON
Former Gov. Sarah Palin and her successor, who served as her lieutenant, have become rivals over a ballot measure to be decided on Tuesday.

Arizona Loose With Its Rules in Executions, Records Show
By FERNANDA SANTOS and JOHN SCHWARTZ
Arizona corrections officials and medical staff members routinely deviate from written rules for conducting executions, state records and court filings show.
In Wake of Indictment, Perry Defends Veto (and Criticizes Obama)
By BRIAN KNOWLTON
Gov. Rick Perry of Texas, accused of using his veto power to pressure Austin's top prosecutor to step down, said, "I would make exactly the same decision." He also said President Obama was responsible for a national erosion of the "rule of law."
Perry Calls Indictment a 'Farce'


For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

DEALBOOK
Bank Overseer PwC Faces Penalty and Sidelining of Regulatory Consulting Unit
By BEN PROTESS and JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG
PricewaterhouseCoopers is said to have agreed to pay a $25 million fine in New York for obscuring misconduct it was supposed to unearth.
Post a Comment



Childhood Passion for Celebrity Still Drives the Editor of People Magazine, Jess Cagle
By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY
For Jess Cagle, the new editor of People magazine who grew up a Hollywood-obsessed pop culture fanatic in Abilene, Tex., the goal is to turn his passion for celebrity into profits.
Kentucky Bourbon Makers See Bright Future
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The distillers have stashed away inventories of five million barrels - at a time when they could sell even more than they are producing.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

German Authors Join Protest Over Amazon's Tactics in E-Book Dispute
By MELISSA EDDY
More than 1,000 German-language authors have written an open letter deriding Amazon's practices in Europe.

DEALBOOK
In Silicon Valley, Mergers Must Meet the Toothbrush Test
By DAVID GELLES
Companies like Google, Facebook and Cisco Systems are employing unorthodox criteria - say, whether a product is used daily, like a toothbrush - to size up their deal targets, and they are handling most acquisitions internally instead of relying on Wall Street bankers.
Post a Comment



For Big-Data Scientists, 'Janitor Work' Is Key Hurdle to Insights
By STEVE LOHR
The analysis of giant data sets promises unique business insights, but much manual effort is still required to prepare the information for parsing.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

For Jumper, Renewed Debate Over Athletic Versus Prosthetic
By SAM BORDEN
Markus Rehm, a world-class German long jumper who uses a prosthetic blade, now finds himself in the same arena of confusion as Oscar Pistorius over how the line is drawn between able-bodied and disabled athletes.

An Agent of Change
By JOE DRAPE
At the heart of LeBron James's homecoming is a promise made 12 years ago between a teenage basketball phenomenon and a self-made businessman selling throwback jerseys out of his car.

It's a New Crown for Williams, but It's Old Hat to Federer in Ohio
By BEN ROTHENBERG
Roger Federer beat David Ferrer to win his sixth title at the Western & Southern Open, while Serena Williams finally claimed a championship that had eluded her by defeating Ana Ivanovic.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

Metropolitan Opera and Two Unions Pass Deadline for Lockout
By MICHAEL COOPER
The Met continued talking early Monday morning with the unions representing its orchestra and chorus, going past the deadline it had set of midnight Sunday.
Met's Labor Drama: The Basic Libretto



MUSIC REVIEW
United by Their Rough Edges
By JON CARAMANICA
Eminem and Rihanna, the megastars and regular collaborators, performed at MetLife Stadium on Saturday night.

Barbarians at the Art Auction Gates? Not to Worry
By LORNE MANLY and ROBIN POGREBIN
Contrary to the perception that art collectors are flipping art to make a quick profit, two analyses show that the resale pace last year was only slightly faster than it was in the mid-1990s.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

2 Killed and Dozen Are Injured as Weekend Shootings Plague New York
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
The tally of shooting victims is up more than 10 percent over last year, despite efforts to tamp down potential violence before it escalates.

THE WORKING LIFE
Despite a Turbulent Work Life, a Minister Doesn't Question Her Calling
By RACHEL L. SWARNS
The Rev. Dominique C. Atchison has served as a church minister and as a chaplain, but she has struggled to remain afloat financially, as have many in her generation called to religious life.
More Working Life Columns



SUMMER IN ...
For Clubs' Swimmers, Bronx Water's Fine, and So Is the Scum
By COREY KILGANNON
A group of private beach clubs in Throgs Neck holds a swim competition every summer. Participants race against each other, and take on the murky Eastchester Bay.
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Media & Advertising

THE MEDIA EQUATION
View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention
By DAVID CARR
In a situation hostile to traditional reporting, the crowdsourced, phone-enabled network of information that Twitter provides has proved invaluable.

ADVERTISING
Edelman P.R. Firm Acts to Correct Faux Pas
By STUART ELLIOTT
"We will treat ourselves like we treat a client," said Ben Boyd, an executive at Edelman, adding, "Just because you advise clients on the complexities of today's world, that doesn't mean they're easier to manage."
News From the Advertising Industry



'The Expendables 3' Fumbles Its Mission
By BROOKS BARNES
"The Expendables 3" appeared to take in a disappointing $16.2 million at North American theaters, and prerelease piracy of the film did not fully explain its poor performance.
For more media and advertising news, go to NYTimes.com/Media »

Obituaries

Sophie Masloff, Ex-Mayor of Pittsburgh, Dies at 96
By ROBERT D. McFADDEN
She was named interim mayor in 1988, succeeding the popular Mayor Richard S. Caliguiri, who died of a rare blood disorder before the end of his third term.

Jay Adams, Who Changed Skateboarding Into Something Radical, Dies at 53
By CONOR DOUGHERTY
Adams, who started surfing at age 4, joined a group of skateboarders who transformed what had been a childish activity by infusing it with aggression and attitude.
An Appraisal: In Empty Pools, Sport's Pioneer Found a Way to Make a Splash


For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
EDITORIAL
Europe's Recurring Malaise
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Misguided European Union policies are impeding further economic recovery.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED | JENNIFER FINNEY BOYLAN
My Life in Bicycles
By JENNIFER FINNEY BOYLAN
I prefer exercising at least two miles away from any other human being, but some day I will have to give up biking alone.

OP-ED COLUMNIST
Frustration in Ferguson
By CHARLES M. BLOW
Beneath the protests over the killing of Michael Brown are deep layers of injustice.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Why We Fight Wars
By PAUL KRUGMAN
Conquest doesn't pay, but political leaders don't seem to care.
Columnist Page


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 18, 1963, James Meredith became the first black to graduate from the University of Mississippi.
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N.Y. Today: 2 Killed and Dozen Are Injured as Weekend Shootings Plague New York; Labor Talks Continue With Unions at the Metropolitan Opera as Deadline Near
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Monday, August 18, 2014

IN THIS EMAIL Today | News | Features | Sports | Arts

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A Terror Trial Comes to Brooklyn

Good morning on this reasonably cool Monday.
In a courtroom in Brooklyn today, jurors will hear witnesses describe violence that took place thousands of miles away, more than a decade ago:
Two suicide bombings in Israel, outside a Tel Aviv disco in 2001 and on a bus in Jerusalem in 2003.
It's part of a civil trial accusing one of the biggest banks in the Middle East, Arab Bank, of knowingly handling money for terrorists linked to Hamas.
Stephanie Clifford, The Times's reporter covering the trial in U.S. District Court, told us, "It's pretty unusual to have plaintiffs who are victims of terror attacks in another country trying to get sort of recompense for it here."
Arab Bank can be tried in New York because several people injured were from here and because the bank does business here.
The suit, filed in 2004 and delayed by politics and complexity, has yielded the first civil trial against a bank under the Anti-Terrorism Act.
More of the day's news »



News

2 Killed and Dozen Are Injured as Weekend Shootings Plague New York
By J. DAVID GOODMAN
The tally of shooting victims is up more than 10 percent over last year, despite efforts to tamp down potential violence before it escalates.

Metropolitan Opera and Two Unions Reach a Tentative Deal
By MICHAEL COOPER
The opera house called off its threat to lock out its workers a little more than a month before its new season is set to open.
Met's Labor Drama: The Basic Libretto



Comptroller's Report Criticizes New York's Tree-Pruning Program
By BENJAMIN MUELLER
A comptroller's audit finds the parks department's street-tree pruning effort to be plagued by haphazard planning and lax oversight, raising safety concerns.

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Features

On Williamsburg Corner, Keeper of a Toy Gorilla, and Old Brooklyn
By VIVIAN YEE
A local folk artist tends to Coco, a life-size stuffed ape, on an undeveloped property worth an estimated $8 million in the rapidly developing neighborhood.

Columnist

THE WORKING LIFE
Despite a Turbulent Work Life, a Minister Doesn't Question Her Calling
By RACHEL L. SWARNS
The Rev. Dominique C. Atchison has served as a church minister and as a chaplain, but she has struggled to remain afloat financially, as have many in her generation called to religious life.
More Working Life Columns



Sports

YANKEES 4, RAYS 2
Thanks to Pitchers, Yankees Finish Trip on an Upbeat Note
By DAVID WALDSTEIN
Hiroki Kuroda had one of his most impressive starts in weeks, allowing two runs and four hits over six and two-thirds innings and setting down 17 batters in a row in one stretch.

CUBS 2, METS 1
Encouraged by Defeat, Mets Stay Positive as Rookie Throws Aggressively
By JORGE ARANGURE Jr.
In what was probably his last start before a return to the minors, Rafael Montero allowed one run in seven and a third innings, the longest outing of his career.

Preseason Wind-Down? Not for a Giants Offense That Needs a Lot of Work
By BILL PENNINGTON
Coach Tom Coughlin threatened to play his starting offense, which is trying to learn the West Coast system, in each of the remaining preseason games out of necessity - or alarm.
For more Sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

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Multimedia

VIDEO: Vows | Celebrity Stylists Wed on the Fly
Ted Gibson and Jason Backe, celebrity hairstylists who run Ted Gibson Beauty together, married "flash mob" style in a Manhattan park.
Related Article



Arts

MUSIC REVIEW
United by Their Rough Edges
By JON CARAMANICA
Eminem and Rihanna, the megastars and regular collaborators, performed at MetLife Stadium on Saturday night.

DANCE REVIEW
Eclipsing a Fast-Food Clown With Beats and Break-Dancing
By BRIAN SEIBERT
Eight hip-hop dance crews competed in the McDonald's B-Boy Royale on Saturday, most of them comprising Asian-American performers.

Barbarians at the Art Auction Gates? Not to Worry
By LORNE MANLY and ROBIN POGREBIN
Contrary to the perception that art collectors are flipping art to make a quick profit, two analyses show that the resale pace last year was only slightly faster than it was in the mid-1990s.
For more Arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »


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Today's Headlines: Troops in Iraq Rout Sunni Militants From a Key Dam
Today's Headlines Tuesday, August 19, 2014


IN THIS EMAIL World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | N.Y./Region | Science | Today's Video | Obituaries | Editorials | Op-Ed | On This Day | CUSTOMIZE »

As a subscriber to Today's Headlines, get all digital access to The Times for just 99 cents.

Top News

Troops in Iraq Rout Sunni Militants From a Key Dam
By HELENE COOPER, MARK LANDLER and AZAM AHMED
Kurdish and Iraqi forces took control of the main dam compound, but fighting continued at the site of a separate dam, officials said.

Missouri Tries Another Idea: Call In National Guard
By MONICA DAVEY, JOHN ELIGON and ALAN BLINDER
In the days since a teenager was shot to death in Ferguson, Mo., an array of state and local law enforcement authorities have swerved from one approach to another.
Timeline: Tension in Ferguson

Photographs: Week of Outcry and Confrontation in Ferguson



DARU JOURNAL
Surviving Ebola, but Untouchable Back Home
By ADAM NOSSITER
As some survivors come back to the world of the living, they feel a chill of wariness, or worse, from neighbors.
For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »

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Editors' Picks

U.S.
Cities Rocked by Past Unrest Offer Lessons in What, and What Not, to Do
By MICHAEL WINES and ERICA GOODE
In a volatile situation in Ferguson, Mo., none of the approaches tried by officials so far have stemmed anger on the streets.

OPINION | OP-ED | ARTHUR C. BROOKS
Breaking Out of the Party Box
By ARTHUR C. BROOKS
Politicians who throw out the rigid script will be more successful.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"For him, eating his spinach is schmoozing with elected officials. This is not something that he loves."
SENATOR CLAIRE MCCASKILL, Democrat of Missouri, on President Obama, who some see as being distant from his own party on Capitol Hill.


Today's Video

VIDEO: One Family Faces the Immigration Debate
With comprehensive immigration reform on hold in Congress, Nancy Paredo's family is waiting on a promise from President Obama to take executive action. Here's a look at some steps he might take.

VIDEO: In Performance | Gunn and Magnussen
Anna Gunn and Billy Magnussen in a scene from the Laura Eason play "Sex With Strangers," about a female novelist and her relationship with a young blogger. The show is at Second Stage Theater.
For more video, go to NYTimes.com/Video »

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World

Rebels Killed Dozens in Attack on Refugees, Ukraine Says
By ANDREW E. KRAMER, ANDREW HIGGINS and DAVID M. HERSZENHORN
Ukraine on Monday accused separatists fighters of firing on a caravan of cars carrying refugees, but rebel leaders denied there had been any attack.

Saudi Is Robbed in Paris, Quickly and Efficiently
By DAN BILEFSKY
Eight armed men attacked a convoy as it was heading to Le Bourget airport north of Paris, taking about $335,000 in cash and sensitive diplomatic documents from the Saudi Embassy.

In China, Myths of Social Cohesion
By ANDREW JACOBS
China's Communist Party has devoted enormous resources to composing historical narratives, like that of the Fragrant Concubine, that seek to legitimize its rule.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »

U.S.

On Books Since 1988, Ohio River Dam Project Keeps Rolling Along
By KEITH SCHNEIDER
The $3 billion Olmsted Locks and Dam project, expected to be finished in 2020, is seen as too big to fail.

Los Angeles to Reduce Arrest Rate in Schools
By JENNIFER MEDINA
New policies with the aim of keeping students out of the court system will end citations for minor offenses like fighting or defacing school property.

Calling for Calm in Ferguson, Obama Cites Need for Improved Race Relations
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
President Obama made clear that he was not issuing a blanket indictment of either the protesting crowds or the law enforcement officers responding to the demonstrations.
Obama Administration Plans Autopsy of Michael Brown in Effort to Keep Peace


For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

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Politics

Obama Is Seen as Frustrating His Own Party
By CARL HULSE, JEREMY W. PETERS and MICHAEL D. SHEAR
President Obama appears remarkably distant from his own party on Capitol Hill, Democrats there say, leaving him with few loyalists as issues erupt abroad and at home.

Behind Closed Doors, Obama Crafts Executive Actions
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
As President Obama increasingly turns to unilateral action to achieve policy goals, activists and businesses are coming forward with their wish lists and making their case out of public view.
Video: One Family Faces the Immigration Debate



Aide Describes Staff Revolt Against Former Virginia Governor's Wife
By JONATHAN WEISMAN and KEN MAGUIRE
Virginia's former secretary of the commonwealth, Janet Vestal Kelly, detailed the strains that "ruined" her relationship with Maureen McDonnell, the wife of former Gov. Bob McDonnell.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

Business

DEALBOOK
PwC Settles With New York Regulator for $25 Million
By BEN PROTESS
The fine is tied to a review PricewaterhouseCoopers did in 2007 for the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ of its transactions with Iran and other countries under sanctions.
Overseer of Banks Facing a Penalty Over Objectivity

PricewaterhouseCoopers' Report, Before and After



E-Bike Sales Are Surging in Europe
By DANNY HAKIM
Although the United States has yet to significantly embrace e-bikes, they are catching on in countries that already have a strong bicycle culture.

DEALBOOK
Rival Bids for Family Dollar Stores as Retailers Fight to Sell to Working Poor
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED and NELSON D. SCHWARTZ
Dollar General offered to buy Family Dollar Stores for $8.9 billion, hoping to break up its fellow deep-discount retailer Family Tree's agreed-upon $8.5 billion merger with Family Dollar.
Merger Competition Among Dollar Stores Lifts Wall Street


For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology

BITS BLOG
Hack of Community Health Systems Affects 4.5 Million Patients
By NICOLE PERLROTH
On Monday, a hospital network said personal data for 4.5 million patients had been stolen in a cyberattack by a group based in China.

DEALBOOK
Bitcoin's Price Falls 12%, to Lowest Value Since May
By SYDNEY EMBER
Bitcoin's price has been noticeably falling in recent weeks after a period of relative stability, though those who trade in the virtual currency say the drop is par for the course.
BITS BLOG
Computer Eyesight Gets a Lot More Accurate
By JOHN MARKOFF
Machines still can't see and identify objects as well as humans, but researchers participating in a contest say error rates have been cut in half over the last year.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports

Tennis Weighs Whether to Bring On the Noise
By BEN ROTHENBERG
The U.S. Open stands out in tennis for the raucousness of its crowds and many top players say their experience at the event makes them willing to consider abandoning the sport's tradition of muting spectators.

With Nadal Out, Mystery Rules Men's Field at U.S. Open
By LYNN ZINSER
The absence of Rafael Nadal, combined with the rest of tennis's so-called Big Four heading in various competitive directions, adds some intrigue to the tournament, which starts next week.

A Group Lifts Paraclimbers to Higher Goals
By JEFF DiNUNZIO
The Adaptive Climbing Group, the brainchild of Kareemah Batts, of Brooklyn, is helping paraclimbers, some of whom have been training for the world championships in Spain next month.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts

In Surprise Finale at Metropolitan Opera's Labor Talks, Both Sides Agree to Cuts
By MICHAEL COOPER
The deal had compromises from both sides, with the unions agreeing to their first pay cut in decades and management abandoning its toughest demands and agreeing to make significant reductions of its own.

THEATER REVIEW | 'THE GREAT SOCIETY'
Flawed President Who Dared to Dream
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
"The Great Society," at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, is the second installment in Robert Schenkkan's Lyndon B. Johnson saga.

Judge Clears Way for Corcoran Takeover
By RANDY KENNEDY
A judge ruled that the Corcoran Gallery of Art could merge with the National Gallery of Art and George Washington University, saying the alternative would probably be its dissolution.
For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »

N.Y./Region

In Five Years, a Federal Prosecutor Has Taken On Terrorism, Corruption and Cuomo
By BENJAMIN WEISER and BEN PROTESS
During his tenure as the United States attorney in Manhattan, Preet Bharara has embraced the media spotlight while fighting attempts to politicize justice.

Man Who Helped Long Island Counselor to Kill Himself Makes Plea Deal, Lawyer Says
By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.
Kenneth Minor is expected to plead guilty to first-degree manslaughter for helping Jeffrey Locker, a motivational speaker, commit suicide in 2009.

THE APPRAISAL
Easy on the Environment, but Not Necessarily the Eyes
By MATT A. V CHABAN
Thomas Paino planned an environmentally friendly interior for his Queens rowhouse, but then embraced a bold design for its exterior, which has prompted vigorous debate.
More Appraisal Columns


For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »

Science

A World of Creatures That Hide in the Open
By KENNETH CHANG
In the ocean, fish can be defenseless without some ingenious strategies. Some can make themselves transparent; others do it with mirrors.
Slide Show: Marine Life You Can See Through



Legal Marijuana for Parents, but Not Their Kids
By TARA PARKER-POPE
Antidrug advocates say efforts to legalize marijuana have created new challenges as they work to educate teenagers and their parents about the unique risks that alcohol, marijuana and other drugs pose to the developing teenage brain.

A CONVERSATION WITH
A Lemur Rescue Mission in Madagascar
By CLAUDIA DREIFUS
Patricia C. Wright, who has long been a leader in the effort to prevent what she calls a "lemur holocaust", tells of her fascination with the animals and how they can be saved.
For more science news, go to NYTimes.com/Science »

Obituaries

Jim Jeffords, Who Altered Power in Senate, Dies at 80
By BRUCE WEBER
Once a Republican who supported abortion rights, gay rights and the National Endowment for the Arts, Senator Jeffords shook up the political landscape when he left the party in 2001.

Jerry Lumpe, Who Played in Two World Series With Yankees, Dies at 81
By RICHARD GOLDSTEIN
Lumpe, who was signed by the same scout who signed Mickey Mantle, made his Yankee debut in 1956 and went on to be an All-Star second baseman for the Tigers.
For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »

Editorials
TODAY'S EDITORIALS
It's Time to Overhaul Clemency
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Judging by the numbers so far, President Obama is the least merciful president in modern history. The federal pardon policy needs to be more transparent and applied more frequently.
New Threats to Democracy in Turkey

Is Gov. Perry's Bad Judgment Really a Crime?


For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST
The Trouble With Tenure
By FRANK BRUNI
Teacher job protections are being challenged, and a lawmaker and former school principal explains why that's good.
Columnist Page



OP-ED COLUMNIST
Ambivalence About America
By ROGER COHEN
Even as Europeans rage at the United States, they love its products.
Columnist Page



OP-DOCS
'Who Speaks Wukchumni?'
By EMMANUEL VAUGHAN-LEE
This short documentary profiles the last fluent speaker of Wukchumni, a Native American language, and her creation of a comprehensive dictionary.
For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY
On Aug. 19, 1934, a plebiscite in Germany approved the vesting of sole executive power in Adolf Hitler as Fuhrer.
See this Front Page | Buy this Front Page




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