NWS Grand Junction

@NWSGJT

Official Twitter account for the National Weather Service Grand Junction. Details: http://t.co/KKTK7cZlhK

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Radar update at 1:20 am: Radar indicates three areas of moderate to heavy rain showers moving northeast. The first is north of I-70 between Rifle and Meeker. The second is over Gateway and Unaweep Canyon towards the Grand Valley (including Grand Junction and Palisade), and Delta (potentially the Grand Mesa). The third area is from Bedrock towards Nucla and Norwood to Sawpit along Highway 145 including Telluride. A Flash Flood Warning remains in effect until 2:45 am for the Arches National Park area. A Flash Flood Warning also remains in effect until 7:15 am for the Norwood to Sawpit areas. The Flash Flood Watch remains in effect until midnight Tuesday night. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through Tuesday evening for all of eastern Utah and western Colorado. Heavy rain is expected to occur off and on as deep sub-tropical moisture continues streaming east northeast. Rainfall amounts by the end of the day Tuesday will vary from 1 to 2 inches across much of the region. Drier conditions move back in Wednesday and look to stick around through the weekend. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Radar update at 12:20 am: Radar indicates two areas of moderate to heavy rain showers moving northeast. The first is over the bookcliffs north of I-70 heading towards Meeker and Craig. The second is over Gateway and Unaweep Canyon moving towards the Colorado National Monument area, the Grand Valley (including Grand Junction and Palisade), and the Grand Mesa. In the third area outlined, thunderstorms are beginning to develop in southeast Utah between Bluff and Blanding and are heading towards southwest Colorado including Cortez. A Flash Flood Warning remains in effect until 2:45 am for the Arches National Park area. The Flash Flood Watch remains in effect until Tuesday evening. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through Tuesday evening for all of eastern Utah and western Colorado. Heavy rain is expected to occur off and on as deep sub-tropical moisture continues streaming east northeast. Rainfall amounts by the end of the day Tuesday will vary from 1 to 2 inches across much of the region. Drier conditions move back in Wednesday and look to stick around through the weekend. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Showers and thunderstorms will continue across the region through tonight. Expect areas of moderate to heavy rainfall with amounts up to 1 inch by 6 am MDT Tuesday morning. A Flash Flood WARNING is in effect until 245 am MDT for Arches National Park and into the northern fringes of Moab, UT. A Flash Flood WATCH is in effect for the remainder of eastern Utah and all of western Colorado through Tuesday evening. Please see our website at weather.gov/gjt for the latest information or follow us on Facebook or Twitter (). (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A cluster of moderate to heavy showers and isolated thunderstorms will continue moving east northeast at 20 mph this evening. The cluster is expected to arrive over eastern Utah by 10 pm MDT and then push into western Colorado by midnight. Moderate to heavy rain can be expected with up to 1 inch of rain possible by 6 am Tuesday morning. A Flash Flood WATCH remains in effect through late Tuesday. Remember, a watch means that conditions are favorable for flash flooding, but no flooding has been observed yet. Visit our website at weather.gov/gjt or follow us on Facebook or Twitter (). Tweet reports and include the hash tag #cowx or #utwx (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A cluster of moderate to heavy showers and isolated thunderstorms will continue moving east northeast at 20 mph this evening. The cluster is expected to arrive over eastern Utah by 10 pm MDT and then push into western Colorado by midnight. Moderate to heavy rain can be expected with up to 1 inch of rain possible by 6 am Tuesday morning. A Flash Flood WATCH remains in effect through late Tuesday. Remember, a watch means that conditions are favorable for flash flooding, but no flooding has been observed yet. Visit our website at weather.gov/gjt or follow us on Facebook or Twitter (). Tweet reports and include the hash tag #cowx or #utwx (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

**Flash Flood Watch This Morning Through Tuesday Evening** Showers and thunderstorms will increase across the region today and continue through Tuesday evening. Locally heavy rain will increase the potential for flash flooding and debris flows with a Flash Flood Watch in effect for much of the forecast area, see www.weather.gov/gjt for more details. Drier air will move in Tuesday night and Wednesday bringing an end to the heavy rain threat. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Showers and thunderstorms will continue pushing east across Utah and into western Colorado later this evening. Heavy rain will be likely as the stronger storms move through. A Flash Flood WATCH remains in effect through late Tuesday. Remember, a watch means that conditions are favorable for flash flooding, but no flooding has been observed yet. Visit our website at weather.gov/gjt or follow us on Facebook or Twitter (). Tweet reports and include the hash tag #cowx or #utwx! (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

**Flash Flood Watch This Morning Through Tuesday Evening** Showers and thunderstorms will increase across the region today and continue through Tuesday evening. Locally heavy rain will increase the potential for flash flooding and debris flows with a Flash Flood Watch in effect for much of the forecast area, see www.weather.gov/gjt for more details. Drier air will move in Tuesday night and Wednesday bringing an end to the heavy rain threat. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Wet weather is on the way for the first two days of the workweek. Rainfall amounts exceeding two inches are possible for some areas, increasing the potential for flash flooding and debris flows. Ahead of the deep moisture, scattered mountain/isolated valleys thunderstorms are expected today with seasonal temperatures. Drier conditions will return by Wednesday with further drying the end of the week. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Scattered mountain thunderstorms are expected this weekend (mainly during the afternoon/evening hours) with a few storms reaching the lower valleys as well. Deep moisture will move overhead Monday into Tuesday leading to widespread showers and thunderstorms across the forecast area. Heavy rainfall will be possible increasing the potential for flash flooding and debris flows. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Afternoon showers and storms will be common each day through the weekend. On Monday, much deeper moisture is expected to move up from the south increasing our chances for significant rainfall. This rainfall may persist through Wednesday. Some discrepancies continue to pop up with this forecast, however, especially concerning amounts of rainfall, where rain will fall, and also intensity. With that in mind, forecast changes are possible over the next few days. Stay tuned to your favorite weather source for the latest updates. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Moisture slowly starts increasing today, mostly down south. As this occurs, a disturbance will move over the region causing some showers and storms to form in the afternoon and evening. The San Juans and Central Mountains are favored though some convection is likely over any higher terrain. A secondary disturbance is forecast to move over the region after midnight which may keep some showers going overnight. Unsettled weather will continue through Tuesday. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Another day of sunshine with some afternoon clouds and warm temperatures. Some gusty winds will also make themselves felt this afternoon with gusts of 20 to 30 mph possible. The next chance for some rain looks to be Thursday through Monday as moisture starts streaming up from the south. Isolated showers and storms are possible with best coverage still looking like Sunday into Monday. As clouds increase, temperatures will drop to more seasonal or a bit below seasonal norms. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Mostly sunny skies expected again today with temperatures a little bit warmer than yesterday. Mostly sunny skies will continue through the end of the week with chances for rain increasing Friday onwards as moisture increases from the south. Best chances for precipitation look to be Sunday into Monday until a passing disturbance shuts off the moisture again. Near seasonal temperatures expected for the most part. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Another cool night is in store for much of eastern Utah and western Colorado before temperatures climb back to more seasonal normals by midweek. Breezy conditions will accompany the warmer weather on Wednesday with afternoon winds from 15 to 25 mph anticipated. Moisture sneaks back in Thursday and Friday, bringing an increasing chance for showers and thunderstorms as we close out the week. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

The driest conditions is quite a while will bring warmer than normal temperatures and plenty of sunshine to western Colorado and eastern Utah today through Wednesday. Beginning Thursday the next Pacific trough will move onshore and the winds aloft will shift to the southwest. This flow will draw monsoon moisture into the area with an increasing chance of rain. Southwest Colorado stands the best chance for widespread rain showers and thunderstorms Thursday through Sunday. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

An upper level trough will continue moving over northeast Utah and northwest and central Colorado today, producing scattered showers and thunderstorms. The storms will be confined mainly to areas north of Interstate 70 and should decrease late this afternoon, then end overnight tonight (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A fast-moving Pacific trough will move over the area today, causing west winds to increase and producing isolated to scattered showers and thunderstorms this afternoon and tonight. Monday through Wednesday are expected to be dry and warm, as high pressure will dominate the weather. Then Thursday and Friday another Pacific trough will approach causing southwest winds to increase, and bringing a chance of showers on Friday. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)