NWS Grand Junction

@NWSGJT

Official Twitter account for the National Weather Service Grand Junction. Details: http://t.co/KKTK7cZlhK

Photos and Videos by @NWSGJT

  • Timeline
  • Gallery

Another warm day is in store for much of eastern Utah and western Colorado as High Pressure remains in place. Some moisture sneaking northward into the southern mountains will trigger isolated thunderstorms this afternoon...generally over the mountains south of Interstate 70. Moisture from Tropical Storm Odile will remain south of us over Arizona and New Mexico. Another storm system will push into the western Great Basin late this week and over the weekend. This system will bring an increased chance of showers along with cooler conditions. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Conditions will be similar to those experienced yesterday with above normal temperatures and isolated to scattered mountain showers and thunderstorms. Little change expected through Thursday as a weak ridge of high pressure settles over the region. Recycling of moderate levels of moisture will fuel afternoon/evening showers and thunderstorms, mainly over the higher terrain through Thursday. Friday through this weekend is likely to be cooler wetter. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Afternoon and evening showers and thunderstorms area expected to form over the higher terrain this afternoon, especially in the south. These storms will produce lightning and strong outflow winds. This scenario will play out through midweek as a ridge of high pressure settles over the region. Temperatures will run near or above seasonal norms through Wednesday. Thursday and Friday are looking moist and cool with the potential for heavy rain, though models continue to struggle with the details. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Mostly sunny and mild conditions are expected for most of the forecast area today. However, a little moisture will move into the San Juan mountains this afternoon fueling a few thunderstorms. These storms will produce more wind than rain and should dissipate by sunset. Afternoon and evening thunderstorms over the higher terrain are expected during the remainder of the weekend and into early next week. There is potential for a significant monsoonal burst Thursday and Friday with heavy rain possible. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Mostly sunny and mild conditions are expected for most of the forecast area today. However, a little moisture will move into the San Juan mountains this afternoon fueling a few thunderstorms. These storms will produce more wind than rain and should dissipate by sunset. Afternoon and evening thunderstorms over the higher terrain are expected during the remainder of the weekend and into early next week. There is potential for a significant monsoonal burst Thursday and Friday with heavy rain possible. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Mostly sunny and mild conditions are expected for most of the forecast area today. However, a little moisture will move into the San Juan mountains this afternoon fueling a few thunderstorms. These storms will produce more wind than rain and should dissipate by sunset. Afternoon and evening thunderstorms over the higher terrain are expected during the remainder of the weekend and into early next week. There is potential for a significant monsoonal burst Thursday and Friday with heavy rain possible. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Cooler temperatures than yesterday will be felt across much of the region with the exception of the southern areas near and around the Four Corners. The forecast area will be under the influence of a dry and cool northwest flow left behind a departing cold front. Sunny skies will prevail. Temperatures will warm to near seasonal levels this weekend with some moisture seeping into the southern areas. This will result in a slight chance of afternoon storms over the southern mountains each day into next week, with mostly sunny skies and dry conditions elsewhere. The next chance of widespread precipitation looks to come late next week as moisture increases across the region with an increasing chance of showers and thunderstorms. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Mostly Sunny skies and warmer temperatures will prevail today with daytime highs closer to seasonal levels. A dry cold front will move across the north tonight which will lead to some breezy conditions this afternoon and much colder temperatures tonight. Below freezing temperatures are possible in the northern Colorado valleys tonight with above freezing temperatures elsewhere. Cooler weather is expected on Friday in the wake of this cold front with below normal readings. Dry weather will prevail through the weekend, with the exception of the San Juan Mountains where a slight chance of afternoon thunderstorms exists, with temperatures warming to near seasonal levels once again. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Mostly Sunny skies and warmer temperatures will prevail today with daytime highs closer to seasonal levels. A dry cold front will move across the north tonight which will lead to some breezy conditions this afternoon and much colder temperatures tonight. Below freezing temperatures are possible in the northern Colorado valleys tonight with above freezing temperatures elsewhere. Cooler weather is expected on Friday in the wake of this cold front with below normal readings. Dry weather will prevail through the weekend, with the exception of the San Juan Mountains where a slight chance of afternoon thunderstorms exists, with temperatures warming to near seasonal levels once again. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A dense fog advisory has been issued for the Grand Valley through 10 am this morning. Expect visibilities down to a quarter mile or less at times along I-70 including the town of Grand Junction and surrounding areas. Patchy fog will occur in other valleys as well through the morning. Fog should burn off by 10 am. Expect mostly sunny skies for the rest of the day with cooler temperatures and an isolated shower possible over the higher terrain. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Some showers will linger along the divide this morning with patchy morning fog in some valleys as the trough of low pressure departs the region and drier air moves in behind it. This drier air will lead to mostly sunny skies and cooler temperatures with below normal readings. Isolated showers are possible in the afternoon over the higher terrain but will be short lived. A disturbance will move across the north and down the Front Range on Thursday resulting in some breezy conditions across the north. Otherwise, dry weather will prevail through the weekend with seasonal temperatures expected by the weekend. A slight chance of afternoon storms will exists this weekend mainly over the San Juan mountains. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Drier weather will be sweeping back into the region overnight and remain in place through Friday. A sliver of moisture will try to work back north into southwest Colorado over the weekend and will bring a slight chance for late day showers and thunderstorms. Temperatures will warm a bit Wednesday and Thursday ahead of a dry cold front that should pass through the northeast Utah and northwest Colorado Thursday night. This will drop temperatures a bit by the end of the week, although the cooling will be brief as we see readings jumping back to more normal levels over the weekend. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through midnight tonight for all of eastern Utah and western Colorado. Heavy rain is expected to occur off and on as deep sub-tropical moisture continues streaming east northeast with thunderstorms embedded as well. Rainfall amounts by the end of the day will vary from 1 to 2 inches across much of the region. This will lead to the potential for flash flooding and mud and debris flows. Drier conditions move back in Wednesday and look to stick around through the weekend. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

An area of moderate to heavy rain will continue trekking across western Colorado. Meanwhile, breaks in the clouds behind this precipitation will give way to storm development over eastern Utah and in extreme western Colorado as the afternoon progresses. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through midnight tonight for all of eastern Utah and western Colorado. Heavy rain is expected to occur off and on as deep sub-tropical moisture continues streaming east northeast with thunderstorms embedded as well. Rainfall amounts by the end of the day will vary from 1 to 2 inches across much of the region. This will lead to the potential for flash flooding and mud and debris flows. Drier conditions move back in Wednesday and look to stick around through the weekend. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Radar update at 6:00 am: Radar indicates the area of moderate to heavy rain over the Norwood, Nucla, Fall Creek, Telluride and Sawpit areas moving into the San Juans. Other showers from Steamboat Springs to Aspen and along the eastern portions of the I-70 corridor from Eagle eastward are moving east-northeast. Much of western Colorado is seeing a break in the shower activity with the dry slot working its way over, but this will be very brief as showers are redeveloping in eastern Utah as of 6 this morning and filling in the dry slot. Expect showers and storms to redevelop after daybreak this morning and fill in across much of eastern Utah and western Colorado through the afternoon and evening with the potential for moderate to heavy rain and flooding increasing as this second wave of moisture and trough axis approaches and moves through. A Flash Flood Warning also remains in effect until 7:15 am for the Norwood to Sawpit areas. Water vapor satellite imagery in the l! ower left indicates a dry slot working into eastern Utah and western Colorado through the morning. This should provide a brief break in shower activity between 5 am and 8 am before the second wave of moisture and shower/storm activity moves in from Utah into western Colorado. Storms are expected to refire in the afternoon for more widespread moderate to heavy rainfall. The Flash Flood Watch remains in effect until midnight tonight. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through midnight tonight for all of eastern Utah and western Colorado. Heavy rain is expected to occur off and on as deep sub-tropical moisture continues streaming east northeast with thunderstorms embedded as well. Rainfall amounts by the end of the day will vary from 1 to 2 inches across much of the region. This will lead to the potential for flash flooding and mud and debris flows. Drier conditions move back in Wednesday and look to stick around through the weekend. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through midnight tonight for all of eastern Utah and western Colorado. Heavy rain is expected to occur off and on as deep sub-tropical moisture continues streaming east northeast with thunderstorms embedded as well. Rainfall amounts by the end of the day will vary from 1 to 2 inches across much of the region. This will lead to the potential for flash flooding and mud and debris flows. Drier conditions move back in Wednesday and look to stick around through the weekend. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

Radar update at 3:00 am: Radar indicates the area of moderate to heavy rain stretching from the I-70 corridor from Silt to Eagle south across the Grand Mesa and Aspen areas towards Montrose, Nucla, Norwood and Telluride. These showers are moving east-northeast. A Flash Flood Warning also remains in effect until 7:15 am for the Norwood to Sawpit areas. Water vapor satellite imagery in the lower left indicates a dry slot working into eastern Utah and western Colorado through the morning. This should provide a brief break in shower activity between 5 am and 8 am before the second wave of moisture and shower/storm activity moves in from Utah into western Colorado. Storms are expected to refire in the afternoon for more widespread moderate to heavy rainfall. The Flash Flood Watch remains in effect until midnight tonight. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through Tuesday evening for all of eastern Utah and western Colorado. Heavy rain is expected to occur off and on as deep sub-tropical moisture continues streaming east northeast. Rainfall amounts by the end of the day Tuesday will vary from 1 to 2 inches across much of the region. Drier conditions move back in Wednesday and look to stick around through the weekend. (Please visit http://weather.gov/gjt for more information.)