MAG

@MAGsaveslives

MAG is a non-profit organisation. We clear landmines, destroy weapons & work with conflict-affected communities. Tweets by Mike & Ingrid.

Photos and Videos by @MAGsaveslives

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AMPUTEE DEMINERS TAKE A BREAK FROM WORK IN CAMBODIA.

[Rum Chek village, Preah Vihear. October 2000]

Around 10% of MAG Cambodia's staff are amputees. It is MAG's policy to actively recruit staff from sections of society that have the fewest employment opportunities.

To read the story of a female deminer who lost a leg in a landmine accident when she was 19 and went on to work for MAG, please go to: http://www.maginternational.org/news/cambodia-a-mag-deminers-story/

To find out more about how MAG invests in local staff, please go to: http://www.maginternational.org/MAG/en/about/donors/investing-in-local-staff/

  • 804 days ago via site
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CHILDREN HOLD UP MINE AWARENESS POSTERS IN HAMDAEET VILLAGE, SUDAN

Apologies for the low image quality, but we hope the subject makes up for it: MAG worked with Sudanese non-governmental organisation JASMAR in this conflict-affected border village, to educate vulnerable residents about the dangers posed by landmines and other explosive remnants of war in the area.

"Now I know what to do if I see mines, and what to say to children in case they find suspicious items," said Adam Yousif, a farmer in Hamdaeet. "Thanks for what you have said to us."

Legend has it that the village was named after a man called Hamid, who, when people called his name, always replied "Daeet", which means "Yes" in the local language.

<a href=";http://www.maginternational.org/sudan" rel="nofollow">;www.maginternational.org/sudan</a>

  • 805 days ago via site
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BRAZZAVILLE, REPUBLIC OF CONGO, JUNE 2012

A MAG Emergency Response Team member in front of one of the many murals painted by MAG on schools walls and in other public places in Brazzaville.

The cartoons warn people – especially children – about the continued danger from deadly items scattered around the city by the massive arms depot explosions in March, and illustrate what to do in the event of coming across any.

"9090" is the number of the telephone hotline set up for people to report any suspected dangerous items.

March's blasts killed at least 280 people, injured 1,500 and made 14,000 homeless.

For the latest on MAG's emergency response in Brazzaville please see http://www.maginternational.org/news/republic-of-congo-helping-communities-and-aid-agencies-after-brazzaville-explosion/

  • 809 days ago via site
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Pic of the day, 12 July 2012: LIBYA, 2012

A monument made from destroyed tanks, close to Al-Rujban in the Nafusa Mountains area of north-western Libya.

The monument was constructed after MAG cleared projectiles from in and around three T72 tanks that were sitting 300 metres from the main highway to Tunisia.

For more information about MAG's work in Libya please go to www.maginternational.org/libya

  • 810 days ago via site
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Pic of the day, 11 July 2012: KOSOVO, 1999

Children play on a destroyed tank in Kosovo.

MAG entered Kosovo almost immediately after the cessation of hostilities in June 1999, with a Mine Action Team from Cambodia deployed as an emergency response to the threat that landmines, cluster bombs and booby traps posed to the Kosovan population.

http://www.maginternational.org/where-we-work/where-mag-works/past-operations/#Kosovo

  • 811 days ago via site
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Pic of the day: Mortar bombs help to hold down the thatched roof of this house in Savannakhet Province, Laos.

Laos is the most bombed country in the world per capita. More than two million tons of ordnance was dropped on the country during the Second Indochina War. Up to 30 per cent of some types of ordnance did not detonate.

More than 50,000 people have been killed or injured as a result of unexploded ordnance (UXO) accidents in Laos since 1964.

UXO contamination also remains a key cause of poverty and is one of the prime factors limiting the country's long-term development, preventing people from using land and denying access to basic services.

For more information on MAG's work in Laos, please visit www.maginternational.org/laopdr

  • 812 days ago via site
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INTERNATIONAL SMALL ARMS DESTRUCTION DAY, JULY 9th

Weapons earmarked for destruction at the Weapons Destruction Workshop in Bujumbura, Burundi.

www.maginternational.org/burundi

  • 813 days ago via site
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EMERGENCY CLEARANCE AND DESTRUCTION OF EXPLOSIVE REMNANTS OF WAR IN LIBYA

Working to reduce the threat of death and injury to local populations and humanitarian aid workers, MAG teams have destroyed more than 175,000 remnants of conflict in Libya since April 2011, including anti-personnel landmines, anti-tank mines, cluster submunitions, unexploded ordnance and Small Arms Ammunition.

In this photo, Mine Action Teams 8 & 9 [funded by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs] stack 125mm OF-19 projectiles collected this week during emergency clearance operations in and around the Al-Qaa ASA (ammunition storage area) south of Zintan.

www.maginternational.org/libya

  • 817 days ago via site
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ARMS DESTRUCTION IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

MAG's destruction team in Kinshasa destroyed 995 weapons during May 2012. To date, MAG DRC has destroyed a total of 125,995 weapons and 865.78 tons of ammunition.

In this photo, technicians from the Congolese armed forces (FARDC) check and register surplus weapons stocks at the Central Logistics Base before destroying them.

This work could not be carried out without funding from the US Department of State's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement, and Foundry 47.

MAG DRC is the only non-governmental organisation with authorisation from the country's Ministry of Defence to destroy surplus military stocks.

www.maginternational.org

  • 818 days ago via site
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To see how MAG saves lives and builds futures in the Democratic Republic of Congo, please go to www.maginternational.org/drc

  • 819 days ago via site
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PUPILS AT CHISANG SCHOOL IN CAMBODIA

The area surrounding the small village of Chisang in Battambang was of strategic military importance during conflicts involving the Khmer Rouge, the Cambodian Government and Vietnamese troops over three different periods of fighting between 1979 and 1996.

Landmines laid during that time and other remnants of those conflicts still affect the villagers today.

MAG’s teams have now cleared more than 1,000 dangerous explosive items and released 470,000 square metres of land, which is now safe to farm and develop.

The future’s looking brighter for the villagers of Chisang.

www.maginternational.org/cambodia

  • 823 days ago via site
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PAGERI VILLAGE IN EASTERN EQUATORIA, SOUTH SUDAN

Civil war has resulted in South Sudan becoming one of the world’s poorest regions. On top of this, there are 800 suspected and confirmed minefields.

Landmines and other explosive remnants of war maim and kill. They also restrict access to vital services such as health and education.

MAG has been operational in South Sudan since 2004, removing the threat and helping to alleviate economic devastation.

www.maginternational.org/southsudan

  • 824 days ago via site
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TRAVELLING TO A VILLAGE IN LAOS.

A MAG Community Liaison team on its way to Phanop village in Khammouane province, Laos.

Community Liaison teams are the eyes and ears of MAG. Their job is to go out and liaise with local people about the presence of landmines and unexploded ordnance, to find out more about what and where the problem is.

www.maginternational.org/cl

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INTERNALLY DISPLACED PEOPLE IN DRC

These children in Katanga province, Democratic Republic of Congo, had fled from Mai-Mai attacks on their village.

Between 1996 and 2003, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was the site of the most deadly conflict since World War Two. This left large concentrations of unexploded ordnance (UXO) scattered across the country, and huge numbers of arms and ammunition stored in unsecure conditions.

While war officially ended in 2003, ongoing conflict has brought new UXO contamination.

On top of this, management of arms and ammunition stored in various areas of the country is practically nonexistent. And in recent years three stockpiles have exploded in DRC, killing or injuring large numbers of people.

Arms and ammunition are regularly diverted from official stockpiles to non-state armed groups, continuing to fuel ongoing violence.

www.maginternational.org/drc

  • 827 days ago via site
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ONE OF THE MOST LANDMINE-AFFECTED AREAS IN THE WORLD

A woman stands in the smoke of cooking fires at the end of the day in Luxia village, Moxico province, Angola.

Following more than four decades of armed conflict, which ended in 2002, Angola is one of the most landmine-affected countries in the world, with more than 2,200 Suspected Hazardous Areas.

Sixty per cent of casualties from accidents involving mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) in 2011 were children under the age of 10.

These deadly remnants of conflict are not only a danger to people’s lives, they also hinder rehabilitation and recovery. Three-quarters of the population is reliant on agriculture for survival, but more than 60 per cent of the land is inaccessible due to mines and UXO. This is a country where more than 70 per cent of the population lives on less than US$2 a day.

Roads were also laid extensively with mines during the civil war and this now restricts safe access to basic services such as education and health care, as well as markets.

And previously unknown mined areas are still being discovered. About four million people were uprooted by the fighting, many fleeing to neighbouring Zambia and Democratic Republic of the Congo. As the population continues to return following a decade of peace, communities are expanding into formerly uninhabited areas where there had been no indication that a threat from mines existed.

www.maginternational.org/angola

  • 831 days ago via site
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CENTRAL EQUATORIA PROVINCE, SOUTH SUDAN

Mundari herdsmen at a cattle camp in Kuruki, Central Equatoria. The tribe suffered from inter-tribal conflicts and cattle rustling in the northern part of the province, so they moved further south looking for safer grazing land.

The area where they settled is contaminated with unexploded ordnance and landmines.

Continuing tribal violence is forcing more and more people to be displaced and to arrive at the camp.

www.maginternational.org/southsudan

  • 832 days ago via site
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GROUND-BREAKING MAG VIETNAM STAFF

Meet the newest staff at MAG Vietnam - members of the first ever international NGO team to operate in Quang Nam province.

Background research, previous assessments and information provided by the provincial military indicate that some areas of the province are heavily contaminated with unexploded ordnance (UXO).

The Community Liaison team pictured will soon start conducting household surveys to determine the locations of UXO affecting the community.

This information will be used to prioritise tasks for MAG Vietnam’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal team, which is due to start working in Quang Nam later this year.

MAG has been working in Quang Tri since 1999 and in Quang Binh since 2002. The move into Quang Nam is an exciting time for our Vietnam programme and we look forward to expanding our lifesaving work in this province.

www.maginternational.org

  • 833 days ago via site
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PREVENTING NEEDLESS CHILD DEATHS IN IRAQ

Working with local partners, MAG conducts Risk Education safety sessions to warn children of the dangers of playing with Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW).

The aim is to reduce the risks to children in homes with unguarded SALW.

"They know at age six or seven what a Kalashnikov is, and that it also kills," says one of MAG's risk instructors, Berivan Sadiq. "They are as familiar with the gun as they are with drinking water."

The boys and girls will then go home to their fathers and tell them to put their guns away in safe places or not to leave them lying on the kitchen table, she explains.

www.maginternational.org/iraq

See also:
Arms safety classes held for children [Irish Examiner article]
www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/arms-safety-classes-held-for-children-179664.html

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