The Atlantic

@TheAtlantic

Feed for The Atlantic magazine and http://t.co/K4L59b584V. Politics, business, technology, entertainment, health, global affairs. Managed by @fordm.

In the early 1900s, Seattle-based photographer Edward S. Curtis embarked on a project of epic scale, to travel the western U.S. and document the lives of Native Americans. A century later, some still celebrate the documentary value of his work, while critics object to its perpetuation of the "noble savage" myth.

This is a portrait Curtis took of a Native American man named Big Head, circa 1905. (Credit: Library of Congress/Edward S. Curtis)

PHOTOS: http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2013/04/native-americans-portraits-from-a-century-ago/100489/

Views 762

1034 days ago

In the early 1900s, Seattle-based photographer Edward S. Curtis embarked on a project of epic scale, to travel the western U.S. and document the lives of Native Americans. A century later, some still celebrate the documentary value of his work, while critics object to its perpetuation of the "noble savage" myth.

This is a portrait Curtis took of a Native American man named Big Head, circa 1905. (Credit: Library of Congress/Edward S. Curtis)

PHOTOS: http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2013/04/native-americans-portraits-from-a-century-ago/100489/

0 Comments

Realtime comments disabled